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Build your case based on their goals (your education, prep for college if that's in the cards, SAT study) rather than yours. Don't BS, but relate it to the "good" reasons for having a computer and you may find a more receptive audience.

What is your parent's perception of your computer use? If they think you lock yourself away all day just playing computer games, they may think that's contributing to your shyness. Unless you can make a good case for the computer providing a positive influence on your life, you're in for a tough sell. You may wind up with a Chromebook simply because you already spend too much time on the computer.

It's hard to know what the details of your family dynamic are, but if it's an option, tell your mom or siblings if you interact with them more on a daily basis. They may be more sympathetic, or at least increase your odds of finding a sympathetic ear. Your dad may be more inclined to offer help if he indirectly hears of your plight rather than it coming across as your asking. Let them know you have to borrow computers or work in the school lab if that's the case. Perhaps ask for a lift to use the library computer when doing an important report. Let them notice the inconvenience and stress added due to the lack of a functional computer rather than asking out of the blue.

Just to add a personal note: Computer gaming doesn't have to be an anti-social activity. It can be "quality family time". I was a gamer before I had kids, and we still play games together regularly nearly 30 years later, even though both are located hundreds or thousands of miles away. Consider playing your games with family members. My sons and I regularly played FPS and RTS game growing up. That alone incentivized me to keep our machines reasonably up-to-date. Consider playing some games with dad.

Build your case based on their goals (your education, prep for college if that's in the cards, SAT study) rather than yours. Don't BS, but relate it to the "good" reasons for having a computer and you may find a more receptive audience.

What is your parent's perception of your computer use? If they think you lock yourself away all day just playing computer games, they may think that's contributing to your shyness. Unless you can make a good case for the computer providing a positive influence on your life, you're in for a tough sell. You may wind up with a Chromebook simply because you already spend too much time on the computer.

It's hard to know what the details of your family dynamic are, but if it's an option, tell your mom or siblings if you interact with them more on a daily basis. They may be more sympathetic, or at least increase your odds of finding a sympathetic ear. Your dad may be more inclined to offer help if he indirectly hears of your plight rather than it coming across as your asking. Let them know you have to borrow computers or work in the school lab if that's the case. Perhaps ask for a lift to use the library computer when doing an important report. Let them notice the inconvenience and stress added due to the lack of a functional computer rather than asking out of the blue.

Build your case based on their goals (your education, prep for college if that's in the cards, SAT study) rather than yours. Don't BS, but relate it to the "good" reasons for having a computer and you may find a more receptive audience.

What is your parent's perception of your computer use? If they think you lock yourself away all day just playing computer games, they may think that's contributing to your shyness. Unless you can make a good case for the computer providing a positive influence on your life, you're in for a tough sell. You may wind up with a Chromebook simply because you already spend too much time on the computer.

It's hard to know what the details of your family dynamic are, but if it's an option, tell your mom or siblings if you interact with them more on a daily basis. They may be more sympathetic, or at least increase your odds of finding a sympathetic ear. Your dad may be more inclined to offer help if he indirectly hears of your plight rather than it coming across as your asking. Let them know you have to borrow computers or work in the school lab if that's the case. Perhaps ask for a lift to use the library computer when doing an important report. Let them notice the inconvenience and stress added due to the lack of a functional computer rather than asking out of the blue.

Just to add a personal note: Computer gaming doesn't have to be an anti-social activity. It can be "quality family time". I was a gamer before I had kids, and we still play games together regularly nearly 30 years later, even though both are located hundreds or thousands of miles away. Consider playing your games with family members. My sons and I regularly played FPS and RTS game growing up. That alone incentivized me to keep our machines reasonably up-to-date. Consider playing some games with dad.

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Build your case based on their goals (your education, prep for college if that's in the cards, SAT study) rather than yours. Don't BS, but relate it to the "good" reasons for having a computer and you may find a more receptive audience.

What is your parent's perception of your computer use? If they think you lock yourself away all day just playing computer games, they may think that's contributing to your shyness. Unless you can make a good case for the computer providing a positive influence on your life, you're in for a tough sell. You may wind up with a Chromebook simply because you already spend too much time on the computer.

It's hard to know what the details of your family dynamic are, but if it's an option, tell your mom or siblings if you interact with them more on a daily basis. They may be more sympathetic, or at least increase your odds of finding a sympathetic ear. Your dad may be more inclined to offer help if he indirectly hears of your plight rather than it coming across as your asking. Let them know you have to borrow computers or work in the school lab if that's the case. Perhaps ask for a lift to use the library computer when doing an important report. Let them notice the inconvenience and stress added due to the lack of a functional computer rather than asking out of the blue.