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2 Extend the two possible results.
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Impossible to know for sure without knowing more about the person / family, but this is something I have already encountered and was greatly puzzled / annoyed until I realized what is going on, and I feel it is worth mentioning as a possibility:

In some families small favors like you describe are used to build and maintain a sense of being together / caring for each other, instead (or beside) of small talk. If this is the case, the "proper" answer is to engage in the game and ask some trivial favors from him, to keep the game going. It can look like:

  • Him: "Bring me newspaper from the table, please"
  • You: "Sure, here you are"
  • You: "Can you hand me those nuts from the cupboard, please?" ...

Now two things can happen. If this is the family culture I have describedcase, he will willinglyyour attempt to raise the issue either in open or in some passive / aggressive form could be inefficient, as it is quite likely the family members are not aware of the the habit and gladly do those trivial favors forwhen you and everyone is happyask about it, the mutual care is flowingthey are puzzled, confused and nobody needsunable to feel abusedexplain. If it

What I like about this approach is notif you try this, chance is hetwo things can take the lesson, seeing his own behavior from the receiving side.happen:

  • If this is the family culture I have described, he will willingly and gladly do those trivial favors for you and everyone is happy, the mutual care is flowing and nobody needs to feel abused, nobody was rude, no issue was even raised.
  • If it is not, chance is he can take the lesson, seeing his own behavior from the receiving side, or at least the absurdness is seen in open and can be acted on somehow. If he will not do the favor for you, just watch his response and apply the same against him once it is your turn again. This is a bit passive/aggressive I am afraid, but it should not be considered rude.

Impossible to know for sure without knowing more about the person / family, but this is something I have already encountered and was greatly puzzled / annoyed until I realized what is going on, and I feel it is worth mentioning as a possibility:

In some families small favors like you describe are used to build and maintain a sense of being together / caring for each other, instead (or beside) of small talk. If this is the case, the "proper" answer is to engage in the game and ask some trivial favors from him, to keep the game going. It can look like:

  • Him: "Bring me newspaper from the table, please"
  • You: "Sure, here you are"
  • You: "Can you hand me those nuts from the cupboard, please?" ...

Now two things can happen. If this is the family culture I have described, he will willingly and gladly do those trivial favors for you and everyone is happy, the mutual care is flowing and nobody needs to feel abused. If it is not, chance is he can take the lesson, seeing his own behavior from the receiving side.

Impossible to know for sure without knowing more about the person / family, but this is something I have already encountered and was greatly puzzled / annoyed until I realized what is going on, and I feel it is worth mentioning as a possibility:

In some families small favors like you describe are used to build and maintain a sense of being together / caring for each other, instead (or beside) of small talk. If this is the case, the "proper" answer is to engage in the game and ask some trivial favors from him, to keep the game going. It can look like:

  • Him: "Bring me newspaper from the table, please"
  • You: "Sure, here you are"
  • You: "Can you hand me those nuts from the cupboard, please?" ...

If this is the case, your attempt to raise the issue either in open or in some passive / aggressive form could be inefficient, as it is quite likely the family members are not aware of the the habit and when you ask about it, they are puzzled, confused and unable to explain.

What I like about this approach is if you try this, two things can happen:

  • If this is the family culture I have described, he will willingly and gladly do those trivial favors for you and everyone is happy, the mutual care is flowing and nobody needs to feel abused, nobody was rude, no issue was even raised.
  • If it is not, chance is he can take the lesson, seeing his own behavior from the receiving side, or at least the absurdness is seen in open and can be acted on somehow. If he will not do the favor for you, just watch his response and apply the same against him once it is your turn again. This is a bit passive/aggressive I am afraid, but it should not be considered rude.
1
source | link

Impossible to know for sure without knowing more about the person / family, but this is something I have already encountered and was greatly puzzled / annoyed until I realized what is going on, and I feel it is worth mentioning as a possibility:

In some families small favors like you describe are used to build and maintain a sense of being together / caring for each other, instead (or beside) of small talk. If this is the case, the "proper" answer is to engage in the game and ask some trivial favors from him, to keep the game going. It can look like:

  • Him: "Bring me newspaper from the table, please"
  • You: "Sure, here you are"
  • You: "Can you hand me those nuts from the cupboard, please?" ...

Now two things can happen. If this is the family culture I have described, he will willingly and gladly do those trivial favors for you and everyone is happy, the mutual care is flowing and nobody needs to feel abused. If it is not, chance is he can take the lesson, seeing his own behavior from the receiving side.