7 clarified that dialogue is example only at that my advice is underwritten by my experience as a practicing professional
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Obviously there are a million ways that a conversation can go, but I thinkand the dialogue presented is merely 'for example', people should use words and phrasing which are appropriate to them and their situation. But my own experience in 30 years as a practicing professional is that there is an onus on any professional to look for a constructive way forward in a meeting with a client. However, there isn't an onus on them to break it to the client that they have a perceptual deficiency.

Obviously there are a million ways that a conversation can go, but I think there is an onus on any professional to look for a constructive way forward in a meeting with a client. However, there isn't an onus on them to break it to the client that they have a perceptual deficiency.

Obviously there are a million ways that a conversation can go, and the dialogue presented is merely 'for example', people should use words and phrasing which are appropriate to them and their situation. But my own experience in 30 years as a practicing professional is that there is an onus on any professional to look for a constructive way forward in a meeting with a client. However, there isn't an onus on them to break it to the client that they have a perceptual deficiency.

6 added 11 characters in body
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I think you are probably correct that the client was frustrated, rather than merely angry. Frustration is the enemy of clear communication and the state of being frustrated is defined in Chambers Dictionary as

and Wikipedia notes that frustration:

  • Recognise that there is a difference in understanding

    Recognise that there is a difference in understanding

    I'm going to pause this discussion, because I can see that we are at odds on this and I think we need to step back and review

I'm going to pause this discussion, because I can see that we are at odds on this and I think we need to step back and review

  • Validate the client and reassure him that there are no shenanigans afoot

    Validate the client and reassure him that there are no shenanigans afoot

    I can see that you are speaking with conviction, and I can assure you that I'm engaging in this with all seriousness and respect and am anxious to work out the problem.

I can see that you are speaking with conviction, and I can assure you that I'm engaging in this with all seriousness and respect and am anxious to work out the problem.

  • recap on the situation, reinforcing where opinions haven't diverged, up to the matter on which you differ.

    Recap on the situation, reinforcing where opinions haven't diverged, up to the matter on which you differ.

    So, where we've got to...I've presented our proposals to you and we've agreed X.Y and Z. Now we've come to discussing the colour of items A and B...

So, where we've got to...I've presented our proposals to you and we've agreed X.Y and Z. Now we've come to discussing the colour of items A and B...

  • outline the thing on which views differ, without attribution of 'you say/I say'.

    Outline the thing on which views differ, without attribution of 'you say/I say'.

    When it comes to A and B, we seem to have a genuine difference of understanding about the colours.

When it comes to A and B, we seem to have a genuine difference of understanding about the colours.

  • Place the control of the means of resolution in the client's hands

    Place the control of the means of resolution in the client's hands

    Should I call in a colleague to try to resolve this, or would you like to take the materials away to discuss with [someone outside] and we can get together again on this tomorrow?

Should I call in a colleague to try to resolve this, or would you like to take the materials away to discuss with [someone outside] and we can get together again on this tomorrow?

Coming to terms with a deficiency of your vision is likely to be a very personal thing, even if it doesn't cause a change in the person's life. Even though they've been living with the condition all of their life, finding out may be a very emotional experience as it may strike at the heart of their perception of themselves, unleashing a cascade of realisations about previous interractionsinteractions. You might steer someone towards the issue, but you shouldn't force awareness on them in a situation when it is at odds with their role in that setting.

I think you are probably correct that the client was frustrated, rather than merely angry. Frustration is the enemy of clear communication and the state of being frustrated is defined in Chambers as

and Wikipedia notes that frustration

  • Recognise that there is a difference in understanding

I'm going to pause this discussion, because I can see that we are at odds on this and I think we need to step back and review

  • Validate the client and reassure him that there are no shenanigans afoot

I can see that you are speaking with conviction, and I can assure you that I'm engaging in this with all seriousness and respect and am anxious to work out the problem.

  • recap on the situation, reinforcing where opinions haven't diverged, up to the matter on which you differ.

So, where we've got to...I've presented our proposals to you and we've agreed X.Y and Z. Now we've come to discussing the colour of items A and B...

  • outline the thing on which views differ, without attribution of 'you say/I say'.

When it comes to A and B, we seem to have a genuine difference of understanding about the colours.

  • Place the control of the means of resolution in the client's hands

Should I call in a colleague to try to resolve this, or would you like to take the materials away to discuss with [someone outside] and we can get together again on this tomorrow?

Coming to terms with a deficiency of your vision is likely to be a very personal thing, even if it doesn't cause a change in the person's life. Even though they've been living with the condition all of their life, finding out may be a very emotional experience as it may strike at the heart of their perception of themselves, unleashing a cascade of realisations about previous interractions. You might steer someone towards the issue, but you shouldn't force awareness on them in a situation when it is at odds with their role in that setting.

I think you are probably correct that the client was frustrated, rather than merely angry. Frustration is the enemy of clear communication and the state of being frustrated is defined in Chambers Dictionary as

and Wikipedia notes that frustration:

  • Recognise that there is a difference in understanding

    I'm going to pause this discussion, because I can see that we are at odds on this and I think we need to step back and review

  • Validate the client and reassure him that there are no shenanigans afoot

    I can see that you are speaking with conviction, and I can assure you that I'm engaging in this with all seriousness and respect and am anxious to work out the problem.

  • Recap on the situation, reinforcing where opinions haven't diverged, up to the matter on which you differ.

    So, where we've got to...I've presented our proposals to you and we've agreed X.Y and Z. Now we've come to discussing the colour of items A and B...

  • Outline the thing on which views differ, without attribution of 'you say/I say'.

    When it comes to A and B, we seem to have a genuine difference of understanding about the colours.

  • Place the control of the means of resolution in the client's hands

    Should I call in a colleague to try to resolve this, or would you like to take the materials away to discuss with [someone outside] and we can get together again on this tomorrow?

Coming to terms with a deficiency of your vision is likely to be a very personal thing, even if it doesn't cause a change in the person's life. Even though they've been living with the condition all of their life, finding out may be a very emotional experience as it may strike at the heart of their perception of themselves, unleashing a cascade of realisations about previous interactions. You might steer someone towards the issue, but you shouldn't force awareness on them in a situation when it is at odds with their role in that setting.

5 Rollback to Revision 3
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I think you are probably correct that the client was frustrated, rather than merely angry. Frustration is the enemy of clear communication and the state of being frustrated is defined in ChambersChambers as

Frustration originates from feelings of uncertainty and insecurity which stems from a sense of inability to fulfill needs. If the needs of an individual are blocked, uneasiness and frustration are more likely to occur.

[...] reaction against perceived oppressors or enemies

In this instance what the client needed was to understand why your colleague was insisting something was true when the client's own eyes told him it wasn't. And your colleague... well he was experiencing the same thing. Each person was telling the other that the evidence of the other's own eyes was not to be trusted. In the absence of a disinterested party to adjudicate there was no obvious way to break the logjam and they got into an unpleasant situation.

  • Recognise that there is a difference in understanding

    I'm going to pause this discussion, because I can see that we are at odds on this and I think we need to step back and review

    Recognise that there is a difference in understanding

I'm going to pause this discussion, because I can see that we are at odds on this and I think we need to step back and review

  • Validate the client and reassure him that there are no shenanigans afoot

    I can see that you are speaking with conviction, and I can assure you that I'm engaging in this with all seriousness and respect and am anxious to work out the problem.

    Validate the client and reassure him that there are no shenanigans afoot

I can see that you are speaking with conviction, and I can assure you that I'm engaging in this with all seriousness and respect and am anxious to work out the problem.

  • Recap on the situation, reinforcing where opinions haven't diverged, up to the matter on which you differ.

    So, where we've got to...I've presented our proposals to you and we've agreed X.Y and Z. Now we've come to discussing the colour of items A and B...

    recap on the situation, reinforcing where opinions haven't diverged, up to the matter on which you differ.

So, where we've got to...I've presented our proposals to you and we've agreed X.Y and Z. Now we've come to discussing the colour of items A and B...

  • Outline the thing on which views differ, without attribution of 'you say/I say'.

    When it comes to A and B, we seem to have a genuine difference of understanding about the colours.

    outline the thing on which views differ, without attribution of 'you say/I say'.

When it comes to A and B, we seem to have a genuine difference of understanding about the colours.

  • Place the control of the means of resolution in the client's hands

    Should I call in a colleague to try to resolve this, or would you like to take the materials away to discuss with [someone outside] and we can get together again on this tomorrow?

    Place the control of the means of resolution in the client's hands

Should I call in a colleague to try to resolve this, or would you like to take the materials away to discuss with [someone outside] and we can get together again on this tomorrow?

Coming to terms with a deficiency of your vision is likely to be a very personal thing, even if it doesn't cause a change in the person's life. Even though they've been living with the condition all of their life, finding out may be a very emotional experience as it may strike at the heart of their perception of themselves, unleashing a cascade of realisations about previous interactionsinterractions. You might steer someone towards the issue, but you shouldn't force awareness on them in a situation when it is at odds with their role in that setting.

An optician or doctor can tell them in a medical setting, a friend or family member might tell them as an equal,... but a relative stranger in a non-medical setting shouldn't take it on themselves if avoidable.

I think you are probably correct that the client was frustrated, rather than merely angry. Frustration is the enemy of clear communication and the state of being frustrated is defined in Chambers as

Frustration originates from feelings of uncertainty and insecurity which stems from a sense of inability to fulfill needs. If the needs of an individual are blocked, uneasiness and frustration are more likely to occur.

[...] reaction against perceived oppressors or enemies

In this instance what the client needed was to understand why your colleague was insisting something was true when the client's own eyes told him it wasn't. And your colleague was experiencing the same thing. Each person was telling the other that the evidence of the other's own eyes was not to be trusted. In the absence of a disinterested party to adjudicate there was no obvious way to break the logjam and they got into an unpleasant situation.

  • Recognise that there is a difference in understanding

    I'm going to pause this discussion, because I can see that we are at odds on this and I think we need to step back and review

  • Validate the client and reassure him that there are no shenanigans afoot

    I can see that you are speaking with conviction, and I can assure you that I'm engaging in this with all seriousness and respect and am anxious to work out the problem.

  • Recap on the situation, reinforcing where opinions haven't diverged, up to the matter on which you differ.

    So, where we've got to...I've presented our proposals to you and we've agreed X.Y and Z. Now we've come to discussing the colour of items A and B...

  • Outline the thing on which views differ, without attribution of 'you say/I say'.

    When it comes to A and B, we seem to have a genuine difference of understanding about the colours.

  • Place the control of the means of resolution in the client's hands

    Should I call in a colleague to try to resolve this, or would you like to take the materials away to discuss with [someone outside] and we can get together again on this tomorrow?

Coming to terms with a deficiency of your vision is likely to be a very personal thing, even if it doesn't cause a change in the person's life. Even though they've been living with the condition all of their life, finding out may be a very emotional experience as it may strike at the heart of their perception of themselves, unleashing a cascade of realisations about previous interactions. You might steer someone towards the issue, but you shouldn't force awareness on them in a situation when it is at odds with their role in that setting.

An optician or doctor can tell them in a medical setting, a friend or family member might tell them as an equal, but a relative stranger in a non-medical setting shouldn't take it on themselves if avoidable.

I think you are probably correct that the client was frustrated, rather than merely angry. Frustration is the enemy of clear communication and the state of being frustrated is defined in Chambers as

originates from feelings of uncertainty and insecurity which stems from a sense of inability to fulfill needs. If the needs of an individual are blocked, uneasiness and frustration are more likely to occur.

reaction against perceived oppressors or enemies

In this instance what the client needed was to understand why your colleague was insisting something was true when the client's own eyes told him it wasn't. And your colleague... well he was experiencing the same thing. Each person was telling the other that the evidence of the other's own eyes was not to be trusted. In the absence of a disinterested party to adjudicate there was no obvious way to break the logjam and they got into an unpleasant situation.

  • Recognise that there is a difference in understanding

I'm going to pause this discussion, because I can see that we are at odds on this and I think we need to step back and review

  • Validate the client and reassure him that there are no shenanigans afoot

I can see that you are speaking with conviction, and I can assure you that I'm engaging in this with all seriousness and respect and am anxious to work out the problem.

  • recap on the situation, reinforcing where opinions haven't diverged, up to the matter on which you differ.

So, where we've got to...I've presented our proposals to you and we've agreed X.Y and Z. Now we've come to discussing the colour of items A and B...

  • outline the thing on which views differ, without attribution of 'you say/I say'.

When it comes to A and B, we seem to have a genuine difference of understanding about the colours.

  • Place the control of the means of resolution in the client's hands

Should I call in a colleague to try to resolve this, or would you like to take the materials away to discuss with [someone outside] and we can get together again on this tomorrow?

Coming to terms with a deficiency of your vision is likely to be a very personal thing, even if it doesn't cause a change in the person's life. Even though they've been living with the condition all of their life, finding out may be a very emotional experience as it may strike at the heart of their perception of themselves, unleashing a cascade of realisations about previous interractions. You might steer someone towards the issue, but you shouldn't force awareness on them in a situation when it is at odds with their role in that setting.

An optician or doctor can tell them in a medical setting, a friend or family member might tell them as an equal... but a relative stranger in a non-medical setting shouldn't take it on themselves if avoidable.

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