2 deleted 5 characters in body
source | link

I feel like I have been cheated, as I offered to pay for the hotel because I thought they wanted to be frugal on the trip.

I'd like to challenge this. Think about it from your friends point of view. In the initial discussion of the trip, they did not find staying in the nice hotel to be important enough to warrant spending $300. They offered an alternative (a cheaper hotel) but you offered to just pay for it.

This does not mean they couldn't afford the nice hotel, or that they didn't want to spend $300 on the trip, it probably just means that while vacationing they felt that their money would be better spent on activities rather than a hotel room.

Your offer to pay for the hotel was very generous, but realistically after you offer to pay it becomes a gift, their motivations for wanting or not wanting a particular hotel are immaterial.

Now on to your question:

How can I approach my friends about this?

Your best bet here is to bring up to your friends that you misunderstood their intentions.

Hey Bob and Joanne, I decided to stick with this hotel because I thought that you it was beyond the budget of everyone's vacation. If I had realized it was affordable but just unwanted, I might have picked something else with the rest of you. Lets try to communicate about this better for the next trip.

It's important to not place blame or any expectation for payment because you already offered to pay without any clarification of their intentionsreasoning. Now, your friends might very well offer to contribute more once your feelings are clear, but they would also be perfectly in the right to just apologize for the misunderstanding and carry on with their day.

In short, I think the best course of action here is to bring up the nature of the misunderstanding and hope for the best. If they decide to contribute more, great. If not, chalk it up to experience. A bit of money which you were already planning to spend anyway is probably not worth the strain to your friendship or the negative impact it would have on the rest of your trip.

I feel like I have been cheated, as I offered to pay for the hotel because I thought they wanted to be frugal on the trip.

I'd like to challenge this. Think about it from your friends point of view. In the initial discussion of the trip, they did not find staying in the nice hotel to be important enough to warrant spending $300. They offered an alternative (a cheaper hotel) but you offered to just pay for it.

This does not mean they couldn't afford the nice hotel, or that they didn't want to spend $300 on the trip, it probably just means that while vacationing they felt that their money would be better spent on activities rather than a hotel room.

Your offer to pay for the hotel was very generous, but realistically after you offer to pay it becomes a gift, their motivations for wanting or not wanting a particular hotel are immaterial.

Now on to your question:

How can I approach my friends about this?

Your best bet here is to bring up to your friends that you misunderstood their intentions.

Hey Bob and Joanne, I decided to stick with this hotel because I thought that you it was beyond the budget of everyone's vacation. If I had realized it was affordable but just unwanted, I might have picked something else with the rest of you. Lets try to communicate about this better for the next trip.

It's important to not place blame or any expectation for payment because you already offered to pay without any clarification of their intentions. Now, your friends might very well offer to contribute more once your feelings are clear, but they would also be perfectly in the right to just apologize for the misunderstanding and carry on with their day.

In short, I think the best course of action here is to bring up the nature of the misunderstanding and hope for the best. If they decide to contribute more, great. If not, chalk it up to experience. A bit of money which you were already planning to spend anyway is probably not worth the strain to your friendship or the negative impact it would have on the rest of your trip.

I feel like I have been cheated, as I offered to pay for the hotel because I thought they wanted to be frugal on the trip.

I'd like to challenge this. Think about it from your friends point of view. In the initial discussion of the trip, they did not find staying in the nice hotel to be important enough to warrant spending $300. They offered an alternative (a cheaper hotel) but you offered to just pay for it.

This does not mean they couldn't afford the nice hotel, or that they didn't want to spend $300 on the trip, it probably just means that while vacationing they felt that their money would be better spent on activities rather than a hotel room.

Your offer to pay for the hotel was very generous, but realistically after you offer to pay it becomes a gift, their motivations for wanting or not wanting a particular hotel are immaterial.

Now on to your question:

How can I approach my friends about this?

Your best bet here is to bring up to your friends that you misunderstood their intentions.

Hey Bob and Joanne, I decided to stick with this hotel because I thought that it was beyond the budget of everyone's vacation. If I had realized it was affordable but just unwanted, I might have picked something else with the rest of you. Lets try to communicate about this better for the next trip.

It's important to not place blame or any expectation for payment because you already offered to pay without any clarification of their reasoning. Now, your friends might very well offer to contribute more once your feelings are clear, but they would also be perfectly in the right to just apologize for the misunderstanding and carry on with their day.

In short, I think the best course of action here is to bring up the nature of the misunderstanding and hope for the best. If they decide to contribute more, great. If not, chalk it up to experience. A bit of money which you were already planning to spend anyway is probably not worth the strain to your friendship or the negative impact it would have on the rest of your trip.

1
source | link

I feel like I have been cheated, as I offered to pay for the hotel because I thought they wanted to be frugal on the trip.

I'd like to challenge this. Think about it from your friends point of view. In the initial discussion of the trip, they did not find staying in the nice hotel to be important enough to warrant spending $300. They offered an alternative (a cheaper hotel) but you offered to just pay for it.

This does not mean they couldn't afford the nice hotel, or that they didn't want to spend $300 on the trip, it probably just means that while vacationing they felt that their money would be better spent on activities rather than a hotel room.

Your offer to pay for the hotel was very generous, but realistically after you offer to pay it becomes a gift, their motivations for wanting or not wanting a particular hotel are immaterial.

Now on to your question:

How can I approach my friends about this?

Your best bet here is to bring up to your friends that you misunderstood their intentions.

Hey Bob and Joanne, I decided to stick with this hotel because I thought that you it was beyond the budget of everyone's vacation. If I had realized it was affordable but just unwanted, I might have picked something else with the rest of you. Lets try to communicate about this better for the next trip.

It's important to not place blame or any expectation for payment because you already offered to pay without any clarification of their intentions. Now, your friends might very well offer to contribute more once your feelings are clear, but they would also be perfectly in the right to just apologize for the misunderstanding and carry on with their day.

In short, I think the best course of action here is to bring up the nature of the misunderstanding and hope for the best. If they decide to contribute more, great. If not, chalk it up to experience. A bit of money which you were already planning to spend anyway is probably not worth the strain to your friendship or the negative impact it would have on the rest of your trip.