3 Fixed a few spelling mistakes
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I have been with the same driving instructor for 3 years

I'm stunned... I sincerely hope it's because of you missing time to go to the driving school. Because it's much more than what's usually needed. I'm talking here as a person working in the car safety business (including driving lessons to all kind of people, ranging from student/beginners to pros) for over 21 years.

First of all, there's nothing wrong asking to change school or instructor. A efficientAnefficient pedagogy needs at least 2 very important factors. One is the quality of theoretical explanations and practical exercices, the second is the relationship between the Jedi and the Padawan.

I often get people coming to my office and telling me how bad their lessons and experiences have been going somewhere else. I can really understand, as many of the persons in that business are, either incompetent, or just greedy (the more the lessons, the more the money...).

What I recommend is just telling them that you feel like you are stuck and nonot progressing any longer. And, because of that, that you want to try a different approach, and another working environementenvironment. It's like switching jobs. No need to tell too much, just be nice when you go away...

How can I approach telling them that I don't want to do my next test with them?

Don't blame them. Just tell them what you feel, and how you'd like to try something different. When driving, if you're in a dead-end, you have to do a 3-points-turn. Same here :)

We tend to talk over text.

Can't help with the wording, just with the idea (see above)


This is an update (done after answer was accepted), intended to help future readers. It gives useful tips/links to UK's DVSA - Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency, the Driver's Record and Competencies, as well as numbers, facts and tips from the BBC. Be sure to check that the instructor's teaching complies with the requieredrequired competencies. Each lesson should start with 1. a reminder of what you did last hour (good and bad) 2. what you'll be working on during that lesson (with a goal to achieve and the things you have to be very careful about) 3. exercicesexercises and explanation that help moving towards the goal. 4. at the end, a rewiew review of the lesson you've just finished (good, bad, what to do next, and how)

I have been with the same driving instructor for 3 years

I'm stunned... I sincerely hope it's because of you missing time to go to the driving school. Because it's much more than what's usually needed. I'm talking here as a person working in the car safety business (including driving lessons to all kind of people, ranging from student/beginners to pros) for over 21 years.

First of all, there's nothing wrong asking to change school or instructor. A efficient pedagogy needs at least 2 very important factors. One is the quality of theoretical explanations and practical exercices, the second is the relationship between the Jedi and the Padawan.

I often get people coming to my office and telling me how bad their lessons and experiences have been going somewhere else. I can really understand, as many of the persons in that business are, either incompetent, or just greedy (the more the lessons, the more the money...).

What I recommend is just telling them that you feel like stuck and no progressing any longer. And, because of that, that you want to try a different approach, and another working environement. It's like switching jobs. No need to tell too much, just be nice when you go away...

How can I approach telling them that I don't want to do my next test with them?

Don't blame them. Just tell them what you feel, and how you'd like to try something different. When driving, if you're in a dead-end, you have to do a 3-points-turn. Same here :)

We tend to talk over text.

Can't help with the wording, just with the idea (see above)


This is an update (done after answer was accepted), intended to help future readers. It gives useful tips/links to UK's DVSA - Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency, the Driver's Record and Competencies, as well as numbers, facts and tips from the BBC. Be sure to check that the instructor's teaching complies with the requiered competencies. Each lesson should start with 1. a reminder of what you did last hour (good and bad) 2. what you'll be working on during that lesson (with a goal to achieve and the things you have to be very careful about) 3. exercices and explanation that help moving towards the goal. 4. at the end, a rewiew of the lesson you've just finished (good, bad, what to do next, and how)

I have been with the same driving instructor for 3 years

I'm stunned... I sincerely hope it's because of you missing time to go to the driving school. Because it's much more than what's usually needed. I'm talking here as a person working in the car safety business (including driving lessons to all kind of people, ranging from student/beginners to pros) for over 21 years.

First of all, there's nothing wrong asking to change school or instructor. Anefficient pedagogy needs at least 2 very important factors. One is the quality of theoretical explanations and practical exercices, the second is the relationship between the Jedi and the Padawan.

I often get people coming to my office and telling me how bad their lessons and experiences have been going somewhere else. I can really understand, as many of the persons in that business are, either incompetent, or just greedy (the more the lessons, the more the money...).

What I recommend is just telling them that you feel like you are stuck and not progressing any longer. And, because of that, that you want to try a different approach, and another working environment. It's like switching jobs. No need to tell too much, just be nice when you go away...

How can I approach telling them that I don't want to do my next test with them?

Don't blame them. Just tell them what you feel, and how you'd like to try something different. When driving, if you're in a dead-end, you have to do a 3-points-turn. Same here :)

We tend to talk over text.

Can't help with the wording, just with the idea (see above)


This is an update (done after answer was accepted), intended to help future readers. It gives useful tips/links to UK's DVSA - Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency, the Driver's Record and Competencies, as well as numbers, facts and tips from the BBC. Be sure to check that the instructor's teaching complies with the required competencies. Each lesson should start with 1. a reminder of what you did last hour (good and bad) 2. what you'll be working on during that lesson (with a goal to achieve and the things you have to be very careful about) 3. exercises and explanation that help moving towards the goal. 4. at the end, a review of the lesson you've just finished (good, bad, what to do next, and how)

2 added links and useful tips
source | link

I have been with the same driving instructor for 3 years

I'm stunned... I sincerely hope it's because of you missing time to go to the driving school. Because it's much more than what's usually needed. I'm talking here as a person working in the car safety business (including driving lessons to all kind of people, ranging from student/beginners to pros) for over 21 years.

First of all, there's nothing wrong asking to change school or instructor. A efficient pedagogy needs at least 2 very important factors. One is the quality of theoretical explanations and practical exercices, the second is the relationship between the Jedi and the Padawan.

I often get people coming to my office and telling me how bad their lessons and experiences have been going somewhere else. I can really understand, as many of the persons in that business are, either incompetent, or just greedy (the more the lessons, the more the money...).

What I recommend is just telling them that you feel like stuck and no progressing any longer. And, because of that, that you want to try a different approach, and another working environement. It's like switching jobs. No need to tell too much, just be nice when you go away...

How can I approach telling them that I don't want to do my next test with them?

Don't blame them. Just tell them what you feel, and how you'd like to try something different. When driving, if you're in a dead-end, you have to do a 3-points-turn. Same here :)

We tend to talk over text.

Can't help with the wording, just with the idea (see above)


This is an update (done after answer was accepted), intended to help future readers. It gives useful tips/links to UK's DVSA - Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency, the Driver's Record and Competencies, as well as numbers, facts and tips from the BBC. Be sure to check that the instructor's teaching complies with the requiered competencies. Each lesson should start with 1. a reminder of what you did last hour (good and bad) 2. what you'll be working on during that lesson (with a goal to achieve and the things you have to be very careful about) 3. exercices and explanation that help moving towards the goal. 4. at the end, a rewiew of the lesson you've just finished (good, bad, what to do next, and how)

I have been with the same driving instructor for 3 years

I'm stunned... I sincerely hope it's because of you missing time to go to the driving school. Because it's much more than what's usually needed. I'm talking here as a person working in the car safety business (including driving lessons to all kind of people, ranging from student/beginners to pros) for over 21 years.

First of all, there's nothing wrong asking to change school or instructor. A efficient pedagogy needs at least 2 very important factors. One is the quality of theoretical explanations and practical exercices, the second is the relationship between the Jedi and the Padawan.

I often get people coming to my office and telling me how bad their lessons and experiences have been going somewhere else. I can really understand, as many of the persons in that business are, either incompetent, or just greedy (the more the lessons, the more the money...).

What I recommend is just telling them that you feel like stuck and no progressing any longer. And, because of that, that you want to try a different approach, and another working environement. It's like switching jobs. No need to tell too much, just be nice when you go away...

How can I approach telling them that I don't want to do my next test with them?

Don't blame them. Just tell them what you feel, and how you'd like to try something different. When driving, if you're in a dead-end, you have to do a 3-points-turn. Same here :)

We tend to talk over text.

Can't help with the wording, just with the idea (see above)

I have been with the same driving instructor for 3 years

I'm stunned... I sincerely hope it's because of you missing time to go to the driving school. Because it's much more than what's usually needed. I'm talking here as a person working in the car safety business (including driving lessons to all kind of people, ranging from student/beginners to pros) for over 21 years.

First of all, there's nothing wrong asking to change school or instructor. A efficient pedagogy needs at least 2 very important factors. One is the quality of theoretical explanations and practical exercices, the second is the relationship between the Jedi and the Padawan.

I often get people coming to my office and telling me how bad their lessons and experiences have been going somewhere else. I can really understand, as many of the persons in that business are, either incompetent, or just greedy (the more the lessons, the more the money...).

What I recommend is just telling them that you feel like stuck and no progressing any longer. And, because of that, that you want to try a different approach, and another working environement. It's like switching jobs. No need to tell too much, just be nice when you go away...

How can I approach telling them that I don't want to do my next test with them?

Don't blame them. Just tell them what you feel, and how you'd like to try something different. When driving, if you're in a dead-end, you have to do a 3-points-turn. Same here :)

We tend to talk over text.

Can't help with the wording, just with the idea (see above)


This is an update (done after answer was accepted), intended to help future readers. It gives useful tips/links to UK's DVSA - Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency, the Driver's Record and Competencies, as well as numbers, facts and tips from the BBC. Be sure to check that the instructor's teaching complies with the requiered competencies. Each lesson should start with 1. a reminder of what you did last hour (good and bad) 2. what you'll be working on during that lesson (with a goal to achieve and the things you have to be very careful about) 3. exercices and explanation that help moving towards the goal. 4. at the end, a rewiew of the lesson you've just finished (good, bad, what to do next, and how)

1
source | link

I have been with the same driving instructor for 3 years

I'm stunned... I sincerely hope it's because of you missing time to go to the driving school. Because it's much more than what's usually needed. I'm talking here as a person working in the car safety business (including driving lessons to all kind of people, ranging from student/beginners to pros) for over 21 years.

First of all, there's nothing wrong asking to change school or instructor. A efficient pedagogy needs at least 2 very important factors. One is the quality of theoretical explanations and practical exercices, the second is the relationship between the Jedi and the Padawan.

I often get people coming to my office and telling me how bad their lessons and experiences have been going somewhere else. I can really understand, as many of the persons in that business are, either incompetent, or just greedy (the more the lessons, the more the money...).

What I recommend is just telling them that you feel like stuck and no progressing any longer. And, because of that, that you want to try a different approach, and another working environement. It's like switching jobs. No need to tell too much, just be nice when you go away...

How can I approach telling them that I don't want to do my next test with them?

Don't blame them. Just tell them what you feel, and how you'd like to try something different. When driving, if you're in a dead-end, you have to do a 3-points-turn. Same here :)

We tend to talk over text.

Can't help with the wording, just with the idea (see above)