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I can relate to your girlfriend. I myself lost my father ~20 years ago. I´mI'm also rather an introvert. It took me years of distance to be able to talk about it. The first few years I would not even cry, just shut down.

I still sometimes get sad when something reminds me of him, like a movie with a strong father-son scene. What I can tell you is, that my wife always notices. She then just cuddles me and telltells me that she loves me. For me that is about the best thing you can do in such a situation. Just hold her and have a tissue ready. If she wants to tell you something, she will. Else just be there.

It also helps talking about it, but I would reserve that for another time, when she is not overwhelmed by mourning. When you have an intimate discussion anyway, you can offer her an opportunity to talk about it.

Either do it passively by disclosing something thematically related yourself. (see this post for a discussion of this approach)

Or just ask her directly, something like: I noticed you still carry a lot of sorrow about your late mother. Whenever you want to talk about it, when you´reyou're ready just tell me. I am always there for you.

Whatever feels appropriate. Just be sensitive and if she rejects your offer, don´tdon't keep pestering her about this. You have to be patient and let her take her time.

At last, I wanted to remind that, while feeling sorrow is not a particularly good experience, those feelings need to be felt from time to time. It´sIt's part of the process of mourning. You can´tcan't spare her that, so just be supportive. I know for a loving partner that you can sometimes feel left out, but this is something you just need to give her space.

I can relate to your girlfriend. I myself lost my father ~20 years ago. I´m also rather an introvert. It took me years of distance to be able to talk about it. The first few years I would not even cry, just shut down.

I still sometimes get sad when something reminds me of him, like a movie with a strong father-son scene. What I can tell you is, that my wife always notices. She then just cuddles me and tell me that she loves me. For me that is about the best thing you can do in such a situation. Just hold her and have a tissue ready. If she wants to tell you something, she will. Else just be there.

It also helps talking about it, but I would reserve that for another time, when she is not overwhelmed by mourning. When you have an intimate discussion anyway, you can offer her opportunity to talk about it.

Either do it passively by disclosing something thematically related yourself. (see this post for a discussion of this approach)

Or just ask her directly, something like: I noticed you still carry a lot of sorrow about your late mother. Whenever you want to talk about it, when you´re ready just tell me. I am always there for you

Whatever feels appropriate. Just be sensitive and if she rejects your offer, don´t keep pestering her about this. You have to be patient and let her take her time.

At last, I wanted to remind that, while feeling sorrow is not a particularly good experience, those feelings need to be felt from time to time. It´s part of the process of mourning. You can´t spare her that, so just be supportive. I know for a loving partner that you can sometimes feel left out, but this is something you just need to give her space.

I can relate to your girlfriend. I myself lost my father ~20 years ago. I'm also rather an introvert. It took me years of distance to be able to talk about it. The first few years I would not even cry, just shut down.

I still sometimes get sad when something reminds me of him, like a movie with a strong father-son scene. What I can tell you is that my wife always notices. She then just cuddles me and tells me that she loves me. For me that is about the best thing you can do in such a situation. Just hold her and have a tissue ready. If she wants to tell you something, she will. Else just be there.

It also helps talking about it, but I would reserve that for another time, when she is not overwhelmed by mourning. When you have an intimate discussion anyway, you can offer her an opportunity to talk about it.

Either do it passively by disclosing something thematically related yourself. (see this post for a discussion of this approach)

Or just ask her directly, something like: I noticed you still carry a lot of sorrow about your late mother. Whenever you want to talk about it, when you're ready just tell me. I am always there for you.

Whatever feels appropriate. Just be sensitive and if she rejects your offer, don't keep pestering her about this. You have to be patient and let her take her time.

At last, I wanted to remind that, while feeling sorrow is not a particularly good experience, those feelings need to be felt from time to time. It's part of the process of mourning. You can't spare her that, so just be supportive. I know for a loving partner that you can sometimes feel left out, but this is something you just need to give her space.

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I can relate to your girlfriend. I myself lost my father ~20 years ago. I´m also rather an introvert. It took me years of distance to be able to talk about it. The first few years I would not even cry, just shut down.

I still sometimes get sad when something reminds me of him, like a movie with a strong father-son scene. What I can tell you is, that my wife always notices. She then just cuddles me and tell me that she loves me. For me that is about the best thing you can do in such a situation. Just hold her and have a tissue ready. If she wants to tell you something, she will. Else just be there.

It also helps talking about it, but I would reserve that for another time, when she is not overwhelmed by mourning. When you have an intimate discussion anyway, you can offer her opportunity to talk about it.

Either do it passively by disclosing something thematically related yourself. (see this post for a discussion of this approach)

Or just ask her directly, something like: I noticed you still carry a lot of sorrow about your late mother. Whenever you want to talk about it, when you´re ready just tell me. I am always there for you

Whatever feels appropriate. Just be sensitive and if she rejects your offer, don´t keep pestering her about this. You have to be patient and let her take her time.

At last, I wanted to remind that, while feeling sorrow is not a particularly good experience, those feelings need to be felt from time to time. It´s part of the process of mourning. You can´t spare her that, so just be supportive. I know for a loving partner that you can sometimes feel left out, but this is something you just need to give her space.

I can relate to your girlfriend. I myself lost my father ~20 years ago. I´m also rather an introvert. It took me years of distance to be able to talk about it. The first few years I would not even cry, just shut down.

I still sometimes get sad when something reminds me of him, like a movie with a strong father-son scene. What I can tell you is, that my wife always notices. She then just cuddles me and tell me that she loves me. For me that is about the best thing you can do in such a situation. Just hold her and have a tissue ready. If she wants to tell you something, she will. Else just be there.

It also helps talking about it, but I would reserve that for another time, when she is not overwhelmed by mourning. When you have an intimate discussion anyway, you can offer her opportunity to talk about it.

Either do it passively by disclosing something thematically related yourself. (see this post for a discussion of this approach)

Or just ask her directly, something like: I noticed you still carry a lot of sorrow about your late mother. Whenever want to talk about it, when you´re ready just tell me. I am always there for you

Whatever feels appropriate. Just be sensitive and if she rejects your offer, don´t keep pestering her about this. You have to be patient and let her take her time.

At last, I wanted to remind that, while feeling sorrow is not a particularly good experience, those feelings need to be felt from time to time. It´s part of the process of mourning. You can´t spare her that, so just be supportive. I know for a loving partner that you can sometimes feel left out, but this is something you just need to give her space.

I can relate to your girlfriend. I myself lost my father ~20 years ago. I´m also rather an introvert. It took me years of distance to be able to talk about it. The first few years I would not even cry, just shut down.

I still sometimes get sad when something reminds me of him, like a movie with a strong father-son scene. What I can tell you is, that my wife always notices. She then just cuddles me and tell me that she loves me. For me that is about the best thing you can do in such a situation. Just hold her and have a tissue ready. If she wants to tell you something, she will. Else just be there.

It also helps talking about it, but I would reserve that for another time, when she is not overwhelmed by mourning. When you have an intimate discussion anyway, you can offer her opportunity to talk about it.

Either do it passively by disclosing something thematically related yourself. (see this post for a discussion of this approach)

Or just ask her directly, something like: I noticed you still carry a lot of sorrow about your late mother. Whenever you want to talk about it, when you´re ready just tell me. I am always there for you

Whatever feels appropriate. Just be sensitive and if she rejects your offer, don´t keep pestering her about this. You have to be patient and let her take her time.

At last, I wanted to remind that, while feeling sorrow is not a particularly good experience, those feelings need to be felt from time to time. It´s part of the process of mourning. You can´t spare her that, so just be supportive. I know for a loving partner that you can sometimes feel left out, but this is something you just need to give her space.

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I can relate to your girlfriend. I myself lost my father ~20 years ago. I´m also rather an introvert. It took me years of distance to be able to talk about it. The first few years I would not even cry, just shut down.

I still sometimes get sad when something reminds me of him, like a movie with a strong father-son scene. What I can tell you is, that my wife always notices. She then just cuddles me and tell me that she loves me. For me that is about the best thing you can do in such a situation. Just hold her and have a tissue ready. If she wants to tell you something, she will. Else just be there.

It also helps talking about it, but I would reserve that for another time, when she is not overwhelmed by mourning. When you have an intimate discussion anyway, you can offer her opportunity to talk about it.

Either do it passively by disclosing something thematically related yourself. (see this post for a discussion of this approach)

Or just ask her directly, something like: I noticed you still carry a lot of sorrow about your late mother. IF you everWhenever want to talk about it, when you´re ready just tell me. I am always there for you

Whatever feels appropriate. Just be sensitive and if she rejects your offer, don´t keep pestering her about this. You have to be patient and let her take her time.

At last, I wanted to remind that, while feeling sorrow is not a particularly good experience, those feelings need to be felt from time to time. It´s part of the process of mourning. You can´t spare her that, so just be supportive. I know for a loving partner that you can sometimes feel left out, but this is something you just need to give her space.

I can relate to your girlfriend. I myself lost my father ~20 years ago. I´m also rather an introvert. It took me years of distance to be able to talk about it. The first few years I would not even cry, just shut down.

I still sometimes get sad when something reminds me of him, like a movie with a strong father-son scene. What I can tell you is, that my wife always notices. She then just cuddles me and tell me that she loves me. For me that is about the best thing you can do in such a situation. Just hold her and have a tissue ready. If she wants to tell you something, she will. Else just be there.

It also helps talking about it, but I would reserve that for another time, when she is not overwhelmed by mourning. When you have an intimate discussion anyway, you can offer her opportunity to talk about it.

Either do it passively by disclosing something thematically related yourself. (see this post for a discussion of this approach)

Or just ask her directly, something like: I noticed you still carry a lot of sorrow about your late mother. IF you ever want to talk about it, when you´re ready just tell me. I am always there for you

Whatever feels appropriate. Just be sensitive and if she rejects your offer, don´t keep pestering her about this. You have to be patient and let her take her time.

At last, I wanted to remind that, while feeling sorrow is not a particularly good experience, those feelings need to be felt from time to time. It´s part of the process of mourning. You can´t spare her that, so just be supportive. I know for a loving partner that you can sometimes feel left out, but this is something you just need to give her space.

I can relate to your girlfriend. I myself lost my father ~20 years ago. I´m also rather an introvert. It took me years of distance to be able to talk about it. The first few years I would not even cry, just shut down.

I still sometimes get sad when something reminds me of him, like a movie with a strong father-son scene. What I can tell you is, that my wife always notices. She then just cuddles me and tell me that she loves me. For me that is about the best thing you can do in such a situation. Just hold her and have a tissue ready. If she wants to tell you something, she will. Else just be there.

It also helps talking about it, but I would reserve that for another time, when she is not overwhelmed by mourning. When you have an intimate discussion anyway, you can offer her opportunity to talk about it.

Either do it passively by disclosing something thematically related yourself. (see this post for a discussion of this approach)

Or just ask her directly, something like: I noticed you still carry a lot of sorrow about your late mother. Whenever want to talk about it, when you´re ready just tell me. I am always there for you

Whatever feels appropriate. Just be sensitive and if she rejects your offer, don´t keep pestering her about this. You have to be patient and let her take her time.

At last, I wanted to remind that, while feeling sorrow is not a particularly good experience, those feelings need to be felt from time to time. It´s part of the process of mourning. You can´t spare her that, so just be supportive. I know for a loving partner that you can sometimes feel left out, but this is something you just need to give her space.

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