2 Made the NVC part more clear.
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Note: There are a lot of great answers here, and while I feel Graham's is the best, his answer includes many personal antidotes that felt wrong to augment when I tried to edit it. He declined my request that he incorporate some of the information provided here to make his more comprehensive. So here is yet another answer, cobbled together the best ideas I've seen here:

Graham astutely points out, you may also have a problem with empathy. As zzzzBov mentions in his answer, what you have actually asking your husband for is 'sympathy' not 'empathy'. It sounds like you are just dumping your day on your partner, which Anne Daunted, points out, may not be something he enjoys.

Why he's interrupting you: Since 'sympathy' comes from a state of emotionally distance, your husband isn't feeling engaged with your conversation, and thus is looking to end it as quickly as possible by immediately offering solutions.

You probably have some friends that do the same thing to you. Do you really enjoy the process of listing to that to that friend that's always complaining? or do you only really talk with her because you know it's safe to complain back?

To break the pattern, you either need to get better at turning your day into a more entertaining story, or be more clear about what 'the problem to solve' really is as as Lamar Latrell suggested in his answer. For instance, if you are having a bad day, you could joke about all of the things that went wrong (which should make it obvious to your husband that you aren't looking for advice). Or, if you want emotional support instead of the ability to just recount your day to someone, don't just ask for him to listen, ask for 'emotional support'.

Being emotionally supportive can require a lot of energy on your partner's part, thus, as Christian mentions, employing some non-violent communication skills here can be very helpful. To start, try to always to ask for permission to start the conversation first, as he may not be in the mindset / mood to be able to be present for you at the moment. If he says he is busy, you need to respect that, but can ask for when a good time to talk might be. Similarly, as noted in the graphic below, try to get in the practice of making request by coupling your emotions to observations rather than assigning judgement or blame to anything thing that happened in your day. You can incorporate this practice into your ask by saying to your partner "I would like"A lot of things happened at work today that made me feel [upset/out of control/angry], I need some emotional support as I had a tough dayright now, do you do you have time right nowto talk?"

enter image description hereenter image description here

More about Non-violent communication can be found here: http://www.nonviolentcommunication.com

Note: There are a lot of great answers here, and while I feel Graham's is the best, his answer includes many personal antidotes that felt wrong to augment when I tried to edit it. He declined my request that he incorporate some of the information provided here to make his more comprehensive. So here is yet another answer, cobbled together the best ideas I've seen here:

Graham astutely points out, you may also have a problem with empathy. As zzzzBov mentions in his answer, what you have actually asking your husband for is 'sympathy' not 'empathy'. It sounds like you are just dumping your day on your partner, which Anne Daunted, points out, may not be something he enjoys.

Why he's interrupting you: Since 'sympathy' comes from a state of emotionally distance, your husband isn't feeling engaged with your conversation, and thus is looking to end it as quickly as possible by immediately offering solutions.

You probably have some friends that do the same thing to you. Do you really enjoy the process of listing to that to that friend that's always complaining? or do you only really talk with her because you know it's safe to complain back?

To break the pattern, you either need to get better at turning your day into a more entertaining story, or be more clear about what 'the problem to solve' really is as as Lamar Latrell suggested in his answer. For instance, if you are having a bad day, you could joke about all of the things that went wrong (which should make it obvious to your husband that you aren't looking for advice). Or, if you want emotional support instead of the ability to just recount your day to someone, don't just ask for him to listen, ask for 'emotional support'.

Being emotionally supportive can require a lot of energy on your partner's part, thus, as Christian mentions, employing some non-violent communication skills here can be very helpful. To start, try to always to ask for permission to start the conversation first, as he may not be in the mindset / mood to be able to be present for you at the moment. If he says he is busy, you need to respect that, but can ask for when a good time to talk might be. Similarly, as noted in the graphic below, try to get in the practice of coupling your emotions to observations rather than assigning judgement or blame to anything thing that happened in your day. You can incorporate this practice into your ask by saying to your partner "I would like emotional support as I had a tough day, do you do you have time right now?"

enter image description here

More about Non-violent communication can be found here: http://www.nonviolentcommunication.com

Note: There are a lot of great answers here, and while I feel Graham's is the best, his answer includes many personal antidotes that felt wrong to augment when I tried to edit it. He declined my request that he incorporate some of the information provided here to make his more comprehensive. So here is yet another answer, cobbled together the best ideas I've seen here:

Graham astutely points out, you may also have a problem with empathy. As zzzzBov mentions in his answer, what you have actually asking your husband for is 'sympathy' not 'empathy'. It sounds like you are just dumping your day on your partner, which Anne Daunted, points out, may not be something he enjoys.

Why he's interrupting you: Since 'sympathy' comes from a state of emotionally distance, your husband isn't feeling engaged with your conversation, and thus is looking to end it as quickly as possible by immediately offering solutions.

You probably have some friends that do the same thing to you. Do you really enjoy the process of listing to that to that friend that's always complaining? or do you only really talk with her because you know it's safe to complain back?

To break the pattern, you either need to get better at turning your day into a more entertaining story, or be more clear about what 'the problem to solve' really is as as Lamar Latrell suggested in his answer. For instance, if you are having a bad day, you could joke about all of the things that went wrong (which should make it obvious to your husband that you aren't looking for advice). Or, if you want emotional support instead of the ability to just recount your day to someone, don't just ask for him to listen, ask for 'emotional support'.

Being emotionally supportive can require a lot of energy on your partner's part, thus, as Christian mentions, employing some non-violent communication skills here can be very helpful. To start, try to always to ask for permission to start the conversation first, as he may not be in the mindset / mood to be able to be present for you at the moment. If he says he is busy, you need to respect that, but can ask for when a good time to talk might be. Similarly, as noted in the graphic below, try to get in the practice of making request by coupling your emotions to observations rather than assigning judgement or blame to anything thing that happened in your day. You can incorporate this practice into your ask by saying to your partner "A lot of things happened at work today that made me feel [upset/out of control/angry], I need some emotional support right now, do you do you have time to talk?"

enter image description here

More about Non-violent communication can be found here: http://www.nonviolentcommunication.com

1
source | link

Note: There are a lot of great answers here, and while I feel Graham's is the best, his answer includes many personal antidotes that felt wrong to augment when I tried to edit it. He declined my request that he incorporate some of the information provided here to make his more comprehensive. So here is yet another answer, cobbled together the best ideas I've seen here:

Graham astutely points out, you may also have a problem with empathy. As zzzzBov mentions in his answer, what you have actually asking your husband for is 'sympathy' not 'empathy'. It sounds like you are just dumping your day on your partner, which Anne Daunted, points out, may not be something he enjoys.

Why he's interrupting you: Since 'sympathy' comes from a state of emotionally distance, your husband isn't feeling engaged with your conversation, and thus is looking to end it as quickly as possible by immediately offering solutions.

You probably have some friends that do the same thing to you. Do you really enjoy the process of listing to that to that friend that's always complaining? or do you only really talk with her because you know it's safe to complain back?

To break the pattern, you either need to get better at turning your day into a more entertaining story, or be more clear about what 'the problem to solve' really is as as Lamar Latrell suggested in his answer. For instance, if you are having a bad day, you could joke about all of the things that went wrong (which should make it obvious to your husband that you aren't looking for advice). Or, if you want emotional support instead of the ability to just recount your day to someone, don't just ask for him to listen, ask for 'emotional support'.

Being emotionally supportive can require a lot of energy on your partner's part, thus, as Christian mentions, employing some non-violent communication skills here can be very helpful. To start, try to always to ask for permission to start the conversation first, as he may not be in the mindset / mood to be able to be present for you at the moment. If he says he is busy, you need to respect that, but can ask for when a good time to talk might be. Similarly, as noted in the graphic below, try to get in the practice of coupling your emotions to observations rather than assigning judgement or blame to anything thing that happened in your day. You can incorporate this practice into your ask by saying to your partner "I would like emotional support as I had a tough day, do you do you have time right now?"

enter image description here

More about Non-violent communication can be found here: http://www.nonviolentcommunication.com