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Hopefully this will put somethings in perspective. When I graduated from nursing school and then started working in my field becoming accomplished and respected by those I worked with, I NEVER heard anything in anyway acknowledging my accomplishment ever from anyone in my family. 

I think your parents know how important it is to you but there could be ambivalence to be excited for you because of how it changes who they are, once you go away their focus of being a parent is changed forever. I know from where you stand their enthusiastic approval is what you’d like to hear and you do deserve recognition. But, it may be more complicated for then to let you go even if it was a few miles away, for them it represents a life stage change just as you going to this university is a life stage change for you. 

Now, I’mI'm in the position of your parents and when my oldest son moved out on his own I was proud of him for taking this big step. But, honestly, with my younger son the emotions were much more sad. It’s

It's harder for a parent to see the job that they’vethey've committed over 24 years end so abruptly as you going so far away. It doesn’tdoesn't even matter how far you go, to them it’sit's far not geographically, but emotionally. No matter how much they think they’vethey've prepared themselves it’sit's still not the same as when it is an imminent reality. They are likely experiencing many mixed emotions, and aren’taren't sure what comes next. 

For some parents the reason that the relationship stays is the combined work of raising children. They could be questioning the nature of their relationship and what they feel for each other. Many issues that they’vethey've put to the back burner for years while staying busy with you and your brother are going to come to the forefront when there’sthere's so much quiet in the house. It’sIt's not just that you were there but probably your friends as well. There was activity, noise, and comings and goings then it’sit's going to be just the two of them. It’sIt's far harder for us middle-aged folk to adjust to this kind of change, if our entire focus has been raising our children then we look around and say “Now"Now What???” I"

I know from where you stand you have worked hard....a big congratulations is due. Your life is stretching out onto a vast horizon of possibility. You may have to step out of your shoes for a second and step into theirs for the next second. Their horizon may look very different and they’rethey're still trying to wrap their minds around how different life will look, it may even be a grieving process for them. I know it’sit's hard to see that, but just stay upbeat, give them some time to work out their new roles. Good Luck.

Hopefully this will put somethings in perspective. When I graduated from nursing school and then started working in my field becoming accomplished and respected by those I worked with, I NEVER heard anything in anyway acknowledging my accomplishment ever from anyone in my family. I think your parents know how important it is to you but there could be ambivalence to be excited for you because of how it changes who they are, once you go away their focus of being a parent is changed forever. I know from where you stand their enthusiastic approval is what you’d like to hear and you do deserve recognition. But, it may be more complicated for then to let you go even if it was a few miles away, for them it represents a life stage change just as you going to this university is a life stage change for you. Now, I’m in the position of your parents and when my oldest son moved out on his own I was proud of him for taking this big step. But, honestly, with my younger son the emotions were much more sad. It’s harder for a parent to see the job that they’ve committed over 24 years end so abruptly as you going so far away. It doesn’t even matter how far you go, to them it’s far not geographically, but emotionally. No matter how much they think they’ve prepared themselves it’s still not the same as when it is an imminent reality. They are likely experiencing many mixed emotions, and aren’t sure what comes next. For some parents the reason that the relationship stays is the combined work of raising children. They could be questioning the nature of their relationship and what they feel for each other. Many issues that they’ve put to the back burner for years while staying busy with you and your brother are going to come to the forefront when there’s so much quiet in the house. It’s not just that you were there but probably your friends as well. There was activity, noise, and comings and goings then it’s going to be just the two of them. It’s far harder for us middle-aged folk to adjust to this kind of change, if our entire focus has been raising our children then we look around and say “Now What???” I know from where you stand you have worked hard....a big congratulations is due. Your life is stretching out onto a vast horizon of possibility. You may have to step out of your shoes for a second and step into theirs for the next second. Their horizon may look very different and they’re still trying to wrap their minds around how different life will look, it may even be a grieving process for them. I know it’s hard to see that, but just stay upbeat, give them some time to work out their new roles. Good Luck.

Hopefully this will put somethings in perspective. When I graduated from nursing school and then started working in my field becoming accomplished and respected by those I worked with, I NEVER heard anything in anyway acknowledging my accomplishment ever from anyone in my family. 

I think your parents know how important it is to you but there could be ambivalence to be excited for you because of how it changes who they are, once you go away their focus of being a parent is changed forever. I know from where you stand their enthusiastic approval is what you’d like to hear and you do deserve recognition. But, it may be more complicated for then to let you go even if it was a few miles away, for them it represents a life stage change just as you going to this university is a life stage change for you. 

Now, I'm in the position of your parents and when my oldest son moved out on his own I was proud of him for taking this big step. But, honestly, with my younger son the emotions were much more sad.

It's harder for a parent to see the job that they've committed over 24 years end so abruptly as you going so far away. It doesn't even matter how far you go, to them it's far not geographically, but emotionally. No matter how much they think they've prepared themselves it's still not the same as when it is an imminent reality. They are likely experiencing many mixed emotions, and aren't sure what comes next. 

For some parents the reason that the relationship stays is the combined work of raising children. They could be questioning the nature of their relationship and what they feel for each other. Many issues that they've put to the back burner for years while staying busy with you and your brother are going to come to the forefront when there's so much quiet in the house. It's not just that you were there but probably your friends as well. There was activity, noise, and comings and goings then it's going to be just the two of them. It's far harder for us middle-aged folk to adjust to this kind of change, if our entire focus has been raising our children then we look around and say "Now What???"

I know from where you stand you have worked hard....a big congratulations is due. Your life is stretching out onto a vast horizon of possibility. You may have to step out of your shoes for a second and step into theirs for the next second. Their horizon may look very different and they're still trying to wrap their minds around how different life will look, it may even be a grieving process for them. I know it's hard to see that, but just stay upbeat, give them some time to work out their new roles. Good Luck.

3 added 489 characters in body
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Hopefully this will put somethings in perspective. When I graduated from nursing school and then started working in my field becoming accomplished and respected by those I worked with, I NEVER heard anything in anyway acknowledging my accomplishment ever from anyone in my family. I think theyyour parents know how important it is to you but there could be ambivalence to be excited for you because of how it changes who they are, once you go away their focus of being a parent is changed forever.

 I know from where you stand their enthusiastic approval is what you’d like to hear and you do deserve recognition. But, it may be more complicated for then to let you go even if it was a few miles away, for them it represents a life stage change just as you going to this university is a life stage change for you. Now, I'mI’m in the position of your parents and when my oldest son moved out on his own I was proud of him for taking this big step. But, honestly, with my younger son the emotions were much more sad.

It'sIt’s harder for a parent to see the job that they'vethey’ve committed over 24 years end so abruptly as you going so far away. It doesn'tdoesn’t even matter how far you go, to them it'sit’s far not geographically, but emotionally. No matter how much they think they'vethey’ve prepared themselves it'sit’s still not the same as when it is an imminent reality. They are likely experiencing many mixed emotions, and aren'taren’t sure what comes next.

  For some parents the reason that the relationship stays is the combined work of raising children. They could be questioning the nature of their relationship and what they feel for each other. Many issues that they'vethey’ve put to the back burner for years while staying busy with you and your brother are going to come to the forefront when there'sthere’s so much quiet in the house. It'sIt’s not just that you were there but probably your friends as well. There was activity, noise, and comings and goings then it'sit’s going to be just the two of them. It'sIt’s far harder for us middle-aged folk to adjust to this kind of change, if our entire focus has been raising our children then we look around and say "Now“Now What???"

I” I know from where you stand you have worked hard....a big congratulations is due. Your life is stretching out onto a vast horizon of possibility. You may have to step out of your shoes for a second and step into theirs for the next second. Their horizon may look very different and they'rethey’re still trying to wrap their minds around how different life will look, it may even be a grieving process for them. I know it'sit’s hard to see that, but just stay upbeat, give them some time to work out their new roles. Good Luck.

Hopefully this will put somethings in perspective. When I graduated from nursing school and then started working in my field becoming accomplished and respected by those I worked with, I NEVER heard anything in anyway acknowledging my accomplishment ever from anyone in my family. I think they know how important it is.

  Now, I'm in the position of your parents and when my oldest son moved out on his own I was proud of him for taking this big step. But, honestly, with my younger son the emotions were much more sad.

It's harder for a parent to see the job that they've committed over 24 years end so abruptly as you going so far away. It doesn't even matter how far you go, to them it's far not geographically, but emotionally. No matter how much they think they've prepared themselves it's still not the same as when it is an imminent reality. They are likely experiencing many mixed emotions, and aren't sure what comes next.

  For some parents the reason that the relationship stays is the combined work of raising children. They could be questioning the nature of their relationship and what they feel for each other. Many issues that they've put to the back burner for years while staying busy with you and your brother are going to come to the forefront when there's so much quiet in the house. It's not just that you were there but probably your friends as well. There was activity, noise, and comings and goings then it's going to be just the two of them. It's far harder for us middle-aged folk to adjust to this kind of change, if our entire focus has been raising our children then we look around and say "Now What???"

I know from where you stand you have worked hard....a big congratulations is due. Your life is stretching out onto a vast horizon of possibility. You may have to step out of your shoes for a second and step into theirs for the next second. Their horizon may look very different and they're still trying to wrap their minds around how different life will look, it may even be a grieving process for them. I know it's hard to see that, but just stay upbeat, give them some time to work out their new roles. Good Luck.

Hopefully this will put somethings in perspective. When I graduated from nursing school and then started working in my field becoming accomplished and respected by those I worked with, I NEVER heard anything in anyway acknowledging my accomplishment ever from anyone in my family. I think your parents know how important it is to you but there could be ambivalence to be excited for you because of how it changes who they are, once you go away their focus of being a parent is changed forever. I know from where you stand their enthusiastic approval is what you’d like to hear and you do deserve recognition. But, it may be more complicated for then to let you go even if it was a few miles away, for them it represents a life stage change just as you going to this university is a life stage change for you. Now, I’m in the position of your parents and when my oldest son moved out on his own I was proud of him for taking this big step. But, honestly, with my younger son the emotions were much more sad. It’s harder for a parent to see the job that they’ve committed over 24 years end so abruptly as you going so far away. It doesn’t even matter how far you go, to them it’s far not geographically, but emotionally. No matter how much they think they’ve prepared themselves it’s still not the same as when it is an imminent reality. They are likely experiencing many mixed emotions, and aren’t sure what comes next. For some parents the reason that the relationship stays is the combined work of raising children. They could be questioning the nature of their relationship and what they feel for each other. Many issues that they’ve put to the back burner for years while staying busy with you and your brother are going to come to the forefront when there’s so much quiet in the house. It’s not just that you were there but probably your friends as well. There was activity, noise, and comings and goings then it’s going to be just the two of them. It’s far harder for us middle-aged folk to adjust to this kind of change, if our entire focus has been raising our children then we look around and say “Now What???” I know from where you stand you have worked hard....a big congratulations is due. Your life is stretching out onto a vast horizon of possibility. You may have to step out of your shoes for a second and step into theirs for the next second. Their horizon may look very different and they’re still trying to wrap their minds around how different life will look, it may even be a grieving process for them. I know it’s hard to see that, but just stay upbeat, give them some time to work out their new roles. Good Luck.

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Hopefully this will put somethings in perspective. When I graduated from nursing school and then started working in my field becoming accomplished and respected by those I worked with, I NEVER heard anything in anyway acknowledging my accomplishment ever from anyone in my family. I think they know how important it is. 

Now, I’mI'm in the position of your parents and when my oldest son moved out on his own I was proud of him for taking this big step. But, honestly, with my younger son the emotions were much more sad. It’s

It's harder for a parent to see the job that they’vethey've committed over 24 years end so abruptly as you going so far away. It doesn’tdoesn't even matter how far you go, to them it’sit's far not geographically, but emotionally. No matter how much they think they’vethey've prepared themselves it’sit's still not the same as when it is an imminent reality. They are likely experiencing many mixed emotions, and aren’taren't sure what comes next. 

For some parents the reason that the relationship stays is the combined work of raising children. They could be questioning the nature of their relationship and what they feel for each other. Many issues that they’vethey've put to the back burner for years while staying busy with you and your brother are going to come to the forefront when there’sthere's so much quiet in the house. It’sIt's not just that you were there but probably your friends as well. There was activity, noise, and comings and goings then it’sit's going to be just the two of them. It’sIt's far harder for us middle-aged folk to adjust to this kind of change, if our entire focus has been raising our children then we look around and say “Now"Now What???” I"

I know from where you stand you have worked hard....a big congratulations is due. Your life is stretching out onto a vast horizon of possibility. You may have to step out of your shoes for a second and step into theirs for the next second. Their horizon may look very different and they’rethey're still trying to wrap their minds around how different life will look, it may even be a grieving process for them. I know it’sit's hard to see that, but just stay upbeat, give them some time to work out their new roles. Good Luck.

Hopefully this will put somethings in perspective. When I graduated from nursing school and then started working in my field becoming accomplished and respected by those I worked with, I NEVER heard anything in anyway acknowledging my accomplishment ever from anyone in my family. I think they know how important it is. Now, I’m in the position of your parents and when my oldest son moved out on his own I was proud of him for taking this big step. But, honestly, with my younger son the emotions were much more sad. It’s harder for a parent to see the job that they’ve committed over 24 years end so abruptly as you going so far away. It doesn’t even matter how far you go, to them it’s far not geographically, but emotionally. No matter how much they think they’ve prepared themselves it’s still not the same as when it is an imminent reality. They are likely experiencing many mixed emotions, and aren’t sure what comes next. For some parents the reason that the relationship stays is the combined work of raising children. They could be questioning the nature of their relationship and what they feel for each other. Many issues that they’ve put to the back burner for years while staying busy with you and your brother are going to come to the forefront when there’s so much quiet in the house. It’s not just that you were there but probably your friends as well. There was activity, noise, and comings and goings then it’s going to be just the two of them. It’s far harder for us middle-aged folk to adjust to this kind of change, if our entire focus has been raising our children then we look around and say “Now What???” I know from where you stand you have worked hard....a big congratulations is due. Your life is stretching out onto a vast horizon of possibility. You may have to step out of your shoes for a second and step into theirs for the next second. Their horizon may look very different and they’re still trying to wrap their minds around how different life will look, it may even be a grieving process for them. I know it’s hard to see that, but just stay upbeat, give them some time to work out their new roles. Good Luck.

Hopefully this will put somethings in perspective. When I graduated from nursing school and then started working in my field becoming accomplished and respected by those I worked with, I NEVER heard anything in anyway acknowledging my accomplishment ever from anyone in my family. I think they know how important it is. 

Now, I'm in the position of your parents and when my oldest son moved out on his own I was proud of him for taking this big step. But, honestly, with my younger son the emotions were much more sad.

It's harder for a parent to see the job that they've committed over 24 years end so abruptly as you going so far away. It doesn't even matter how far you go, to them it's far not geographically, but emotionally. No matter how much they think they've prepared themselves it's still not the same as when it is an imminent reality. They are likely experiencing many mixed emotions, and aren't sure what comes next. 

For some parents the reason that the relationship stays is the combined work of raising children. They could be questioning the nature of their relationship and what they feel for each other. Many issues that they've put to the back burner for years while staying busy with you and your brother are going to come to the forefront when there's so much quiet in the house. It's not just that you were there but probably your friends as well. There was activity, noise, and comings and goings then it's going to be just the two of them. It's far harder for us middle-aged folk to adjust to this kind of change, if our entire focus has been raising our children then we look around and say "Now What???"

I know from where you stand you have worked hard....a big congratulations is due. Your life is stretching out onto a vast horizon of possibility. You may have to step out of your shoes for a second and step into theirs for the next second. Their horizon may look very different and they're still trying to wrap their minds around how different life will look, it may even be a grieving process for them. I know it's hard to see that, but just stay upbeat, give them some time to work out their new roles. Good Luck.

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