5 grammar and spelling fixes
source | link

Pro-tip: NeverPro-tip: Never get matching designs, namenames, or any other tattoos that will forever be a reminder of someone.

With the exception of your own children, or perhaps mother, these kinds of tattoos are nearly always a bad idea. If/when you have a falling out, you're forever stuck with the tattoo. Good cover-up work is difficult to pull off, and laser removal is expensive and painful. Well, both options are expensive and painful.

I made this mistake with a former partner. For an anniversary present, we each got tattoos to commemorate the relationship. Different designs, but they both incorporated the same little heart. Mine used an awful lot of blackblack, so a cover-up is pretty much a non-option, unless I want to get one of those blackout tattoos.

Relationships just aren't as permanent as tattoos. Regardless of whether it's a friend, lover, or family member, these tattoos have a nasty way of outlasting the relationships they're intended to remind you of...

So...

I think this may be one of those cases where it's probably going to be better to bite the bullet, accept that she's going to be upset with you and complain about it, and tell her the truth.

This approach would also have the benefit of shedding a little light on the overly possessive tendency in this friendship that seems to be the real underlying problem. It sounds like this whole tattoo idea is a symptom, not the disease. Curing the disease will probably require some uncomfortable, honest conversation with A about how she treats you and the other people in your life. Possessiveness isn't a great quality, but loyalty is. She may not recognize the distinction, so you may need to explain it to her.

Hey, we've been best friends for forever. I really value your loyalty, you've always been there for me when I needed a friend, but this possessive stuff is wearing a little thin...

The wording is of course optional. Just honestly communicate about what you're seeing and the problems it's causing, while being clear that you still value the friendship.


Then again... I suppose it has a bit to do with your philosophy surrounding tattooing. Is it a rite of passage? is it a diary? a remembrance of things that you've lived through or conquered? a collage of things you've found meaningful over the years? purely artistic expression? a catalog of poor choices?  ... People People get tattoos for a lot of reasons... But if you're the sort of person who is going to look at a particular tattoo with regrets many years from now, probably best to be cautious.

Personally, I have some tragic tattoos. I don't regret any of them, not even the anniversary tattoo. I don't want to die without any scars... I know that's pithy and trite, but it's how I get by. Our scars remind us who we are and where we've been, and I find a lot of value in that.

And... before someone comes along and points out the contradiction in this answer... I'm clearly not a role model. I'm painfully aware that I tend to view things a bit differently than the average pedant. The average pedant probably has very few tattoos, if any, and probably no tragic tattoos... Embracing your mistakes is a skill learned by those that have the courage to make mistakes, but please make fewer mistakes than I tend to ;)

Pro-tip: Never get matching, name, or any other tattoos that will forever be a reminder of someone.

With the exception of your own children, or perhaps mother, these kinds of tattoos are nearly always a bad idea. If/when you have a falling out, you're forever stuck with the tattoo. Good cover-up work is difficult to pull off, and laser removal is expensive and painful. Well, both options are expensive and painful.

I made this mistake with a former partner. For an anniversary present, we each got tattoos to commemorate the relationship. Different designs, but they both incorporated the same little heart. Mine used an awful lot of black, so a cover-up is pretty much a non-option, unless I want to get one of those blackout tattoos.

Relationships just aren't as permanent as tattoos. Regardless of whether it's a friend, lover, or family member, these tattoos have a nasty way of outlasting the relationships they're intended to remind you of...

So...

I think this may be one of those cases where it's probably going to be better to bite the bullet, accept that she's going to be upset with you and complain about it, and tell her the truth.

This approach would also have the benefit of shedding a little light on the overly possessive tendency in this friendship that seems to be the real underlying problem. It sounds like this whole tattoo idea is a symptom, not the disease. Curing the disease will probably require some uncomfortable, honest conversation with A about how she treats you and the other people in your life. Possessiveness isn't a great quality, but loyalty is. She may not recognize the distinction, so you may need to explain it to her.

Hey, we've been best friends for forever. I really value your loyalty, you've always been there for me when I needed a friend, but this possessive stuff is wearing a little thin...

The wording is of course optional. Just honestly communicate about what you're seeing and the problems it's causing, while being clear that you still value the friendship.


Then again... I suppose it has a bit to do with your philosophy surrounding tattooing. Is it a rite of passage? is it a diary? a remembrance of things that you've lived through or conquered? a collage of things you've found meaningful over the years? purely artistic expression? a catalog of poor choices?... People get tattoos for a lot of reasons... But if you're the sort of person who is going to look at a particular tattoo with regrets many years from now, probably best to be cautious.

Personally, I have some tragic tattoos. I don't regret any of them, not even the anniversary tattoo. I don't want to die without any scars... I know that's pithy and trite, but it's how I get by. Our scars remind us who we are and where we've been, and I find a lot of value in that.

And... before someone comes along and points out the contradiction in this answer... I'm clearly not a role model. I'm painfully aware that I tend to view things a bit differently than the average pedant. The average pedant probably has very few tattoos, if any, and probably no tragic tattoos... Embracing your mistakes is a skill learned by those that have the courage to make mistakes, but please make fewer mistakes than I tend to ;)

Pro-tip: Never get matching designs, names, or any other tattoos that will forever be a reminder of someone.

With the exception of your own children, or perhaps mother, these kinds of tattoos are nearly always a bad idea. If/when you have a falling out, you're forever stuck with the tattoo. Good cover-up work is difficult to pull off, and laser removal is expensive and painful. Well, both options are expensive and painful.

I made this mistake with a former partner. For an anniversary present, we each got tattoos to commemorate the relationship. Different designs, but they both incorporated the same little heart. Mine used an awful lot of black, so a cover-up is pretty much a non-option, unless I want to get one of those blackout tattoos.

Relationships just aren't as permanent as tattoos. Regardless of whether it's a friend, lover, or family member, these tattoos have a nasty way of outlasting the relationships they're intended to remind you of.

So...

I think this may be one of those cases where it's probably going to be better to bite the bullet, accept that she's going to be upset with you and complain about it, and tell her the truth.

This approach would also have the benefit of shedding a little light on the overly possessive tendency in this friendship that seems to be the real underlying problem. It sounds like this whole tattoo idea is a symptom, not the disease. Curing the disease will probably require some uncomfortable, honest conversation with A about how she treats you and the other people in your life. Possessiveness isn't a great quality, but loyalty is. She may not recognize the distinction, so you may need to explain it to her.

Hey, we've been best friends for forever. I really value your loyalty, you've always been there for me when I needed a friend, but this possessive stuff is wearing a little thin...

The wording is of course optional. Just honestly communicate about what you're seeing and the problems it's causing, while being clear that you still value the friendship.


Then again... I suppose it has a bit to do with your philosophy surrounding tattooing. Is it a rite of passage? is it a diary? a remembrance of things that you've lived through or conquered? a collage of things you've found meaningful over the years? purely artistic expression? a catalog of poor choices?  ... People get tattoos for a lot of reasons. But if you're the sort of person who is going to look at a particular tattoo with regrets many years from now, probably best to be cautious.

Personally, I have some tragic tattoos. I don't regret any of them, not even the anniversary tattoo. I don't want to die without any scars. I know that's pithy and trite, but it's how I get by. Our scars remind us who we are and where we've been, and I find a lot of value in that.

And before someone comes along and points out the contradiction in this answer I'm clearly not a role model. I'm painfully aware that I tend to view things a bit differently than the average pedant. The average pedant probably has very few tattoos, if any, and probably no tragic tattoos. Embracing your mistakes is a skill learned by those that have the courage to make mistakes, but please make fewer mistakes than I tend to ;)

4 grammar and spelling fixes
source | link

Pro-tip: Never get matching, namesname, or any other tattoos that will forever be a forever reminder of someone.

With the exception of your own children, or perhaps mother, these kinds of tattoos are nearly always a bad idea. If/when you have a falling out, you're forever stuck with the tattoo. Good cover-up work is difficult to pull off, and lazerlaser removal is expensive and painful. Well, both options are expensive and painful.

I made this mistake with a former partner. For an anniversary present, we each got tattoos to commemorate the relationship. Different designs, but they both incorporated the same little heart. Mine used an awful lot of black, so a cover-up is pretty much a non-option, unless I want to get one of those blackout tattoos.

Relationships just aren't as permanent as tattoos. Regardless of whether it's a friend, lover, or family member, these tattoos have a nasty way of outlasting the relationships they're intended to remind you of...

So...

I think this may be one of those cases where it's probably going to be better to bite the bullet, accept that they'reshe's going to be upset with you and complain about it, and tell themher the truth. 

This approach would also have the benefit of shedding a little light on the overly possessive tendency, in this friendship, that seems to be the real underlying problem.

  It sounds like this whole tattoo idea is a symptom, not the disease. Curing the disease will probably require some uncomfortable, honest conversation with AA about how she treats you and the other people in your life. Possessiveness isn't a great quality, but loyalty is. She may not recognize the distinction, so you may need to explain it to her.

Hey, we've been best friends for forever. I really value your loyalty, you've always been there for me when I needed a friend, but this possessive stuff is wearing a little thin...

The wording is of course optional. Just honestly communicate about what you're seeing and the problems it's causing, while being clear that you still value the friendship.


Then again... I suppose it has a bit to do with your philosophy surrounding tattooing. Is it a rite of passage,? is it a diary,? a rememberenceremembrance of things that you've lived through, or conquered,? a collage of things you've found meaningful over the years,? purely artistic expression,? a catalog of poor choices?... People get tattoos for a lot of reasons... But if you're the sort of person who is going to look at a particular tattoo with regrets many years from now, probably best to be cautious.

Personally, I have some tragic tattoos. I don't regret any of them, not even the anniversary tattoo. I don't want to die without any scars... I know that's pithy and trite, but it's how I get by. Our scars remind us who we are and where we've been, and I find a lot of value in that.

And... Beforebefore someone comes along and points out the contradiction in this answer... I'm clearly not a role model. I'm painfully aware that I tend to view things a bit differently than the adverageaverage pedant. The adverageaverage pedant probably has very few tattoos, if any, and proabablyprobably no tragic tattoos... Embracing your mistakes is a skill learned by those that have the courage to make mistakes, but please make fewer mistakes than I tend to ;)

Pro-tip: Never get matching, names, or any tattoos that will be a forever reminder of someone.

With the exception of your own children, or perhaps mother, these kinds of tattoos are nearly always a bad idea. If/when you have a falling out, you're forever stuck with the tattoo. Good cover-up work is difficult to pull off, and lazer removal is expensive and painful. Well, both options are expensive and painful.

I made this mistake with a former partner. For an anniversary present we each got tattoos to commemorate the relationship. Different designs, but they both incorporated the same little heart. Mine used an awful lot of black, so a cover-up is pretty much a non-option, unless I want to get one of those blackout tattoos.

Relationships just aren't as permanent as tattoos. Regardless of whether it's a friend, lover, or family member, these tattoos have a nasty way of outlasting the relationships they're intended to remind you of...

So...

I think this may be one of those cases where it's probably going to be better to bite the bullet, accept that they're going to be upset with you and complain about it, and tell them the truth. This approach would also have the benefit of shedding a little light on the overly possessive tendency, in this friendship, that seems to be the real underlying problem.

  It sounds like this whole tattoo idea is a symptom, not the disease. Curing the disease will probably require some uncomfortable, honest conversation with A about how she treats you and the other people in your life. Possessiveness isn't a great quality, but loyalty is. She may not recognize the distinction, so you may need to explain it to her.

Hey, we've been best friends for forever. I really value your loyalty, you've always been there for me when I needed a friend, but this possessive stuff is wearing a little thin...

The wording is of course optional. Just honestly communicate about what you're seeing and the problems it's causing, while being clear that you still value the friendship.


Then again... I suppose it has a bit to do with your philosophy surrounding tattooing. Is it a rite of passage, is it a diary, a rememberence of things that you've lived through, or conquered, a collage of things you've found meaningful over the years, purely artistic expression, a catalog of poor choices... People get tattoos for a lot of reasons... But if you're the sort of person who is going to look at a particular tattoo with regrets many years from now, probably best to be cautious.

Personally, I have some tragic tattoos. I don't regret any of them, not even the anniversary tattoo. I don't want to die without any scars... I know that's pithy and trite, but it's how I get by. Our scars remind us who we are and where we've been, and I find a lot of value in that.

And... Before someone comes along and points out the contradiction in this answer... I'm clearly not a role model. I'm painfully aware that I tend to view things a bit differently than the adverage pedant. The adverage pedant probably has very few tattoos, if any, and proabably no tragic tattoos... Embracing your mistakes is a skill learned by those that have the courage to make mistakes, but please make fewer mistakes than I tend to ;)

Pro-tip: Never get matching, name, or any other tattoos that will forever be a reminder of someone.

With the exception of your own children, or perhaps mother, these kinds of tattoos are nearly always a bad idea. If/when you have a falling out, you're forever stuck with the tattoo. Good cover-up work is difficult to pull off, and laser removal is expensive and painful. Well, both options are expensive and painful.

I made this mistake with a former partner. For an anniversary present, we each got tattoos to commemorate the relationship. Different designs, but they both incorporated the same little heart. Mine used an awful lot of black, so a cover-up is pretty much a non-option, unless I want to get one of those blackout tattoos.

Relationships just aren't as permanent as tattoos. Regardless of whether it's a friend, lover, or family member, these tattoos have a nasty way of outlasting the relationships they're intended to remind you of...

So...

I think this may be one of those cases where it's probably going to be better to bite the bullet, accept that she's going to be upset with you and complain about it, and tell her the truth. 

This approach would also have the benefit of shedding a little light on the overly possessive tendency in this friendship that seems to be the real underlying problem. It sounds like this whole tattoo idea is a symptom, not the disease. Curing the disease will probably require some uncomfortable, honest conversation with A about how she treats you and the other people in your life. Possessiveness isn't a great quality, but loyalty is. She may not recognize the distinction, so you may need to explain it to her.

Hey, we've been best friends for forever. I really value your loyalty, you've always been there for me when I needed a friend, but this possessive stuff is wearing a little thin...

The wording is of course optional. Just honestly communicate about what you're seeing and the problems it's causing, while being clear that you still value the friendship.


Then again... I suppose it has a bit to do with your philosophy surrounding tattooing. Is it a rite of passage? is it a diary? a remembrance of things that you've lived through or conquered? a collage of things you've found meaningful over the years? purely artistic expression? a catalog of poor choices?... People get tattoos for a lot of reasons... But if you're the sort of person who is going to look at a particular tattoo with regrets many years from now, probably best to be cautious.

Personally, I have some tragic tattoos. I don't regret any of them, not even the anniversary tattoo. I don't want to die without any scars... I know that's pithy and trite, but it's how I get by. Our scars remind us who we are and where we've been, and I find a lot of value in that.

And... before someone comes along and points out the contradiction in this answer... I'm clearly not a role model. I'm painfully aware that I tend to view things a bit differently than the average pedant. The average pedant probably has very few tattoos, if any, and probably no tragic tattoos... Embracing your mistakes is a skill learned by those that have the courage to make mistakes, but please make fewer mistakes than I tend to ;)

3 A rite is not anything like a right
source | link

Pro-tip: Never get matching, names, or any tattoos that will be a forever reminder of someone.

With the exception of your own children, or perhaps mother, these kinds of tattoos are nearly always a bad idea. If/when you have a falling out, you're forever stuck with the tattoo. Good cover-up work is difficult to pull off, and lazer removal is expensive and painful. Well, both options are expensive and painful.

I made this mistake with a former partner. For an anniversary present we each got tattoos to commemorate the relationship. Different designs, but they both incorporated the same little heart. Mine used an awful lot of black, so a cover-up is pretty much a non-option, unless I want to get one of those blackout tattoos.

Relationships just aren't as permanent as tattoos. Regardless of whether it's a friend, lover, or family member, these tattoos have a nasty way of outlasting the relationships they're intended to remind you of...

So...

I think this may be one of those cases where it's probably going to be better to bite the bullet, accept that they're going to be upset with you and complain about it, and tell them the truth. This approach would also have the benefit of shedding a little light on the overly possessive tendency, in this friendship, that seems to be the real underlying problem.

It sounds like this whole tattoo idea is a symptom, not the disease. Curing the disease will probably require some uncomfortable, honest conversation with A about how she treats you and the other people in your life. Possessiveness isn't a great quality, but loyalty is. She may not recognize the distinction, so you may need to explain it to her.

Hey, we've been best friends for forever. I really value your loyalty, you've always been there for me when I needed a friend, but this possessive stuff is wearing a little thin...

The wording is of course optional. Just honestly communicate about what you're seeing and the problems it's causing, while being clear that you still value the friendship.


Then again... I suppose it has a bit to do with your philosophy surrounding tattooing. Is it a rightrite of passage, is it a diary, a rememberence of things that you've lived through, or conquered, a collage of things you've found meaningful over the years, purely artistic expression, a catalog of poor choices... People get tattoos for a lot of reasons... But if you're the sort of person who is going to look at a particular tattoo with regrets many years from now, probably best to be cautious.

Personally, I have some tragic tattoos. I don't regret any of them, not even the anniversary tattoo. I don't want to die without any scars... I know that's pithy and trite, but it's how I get by. Our scars remind us who we are and where we've been, and I find a lot of value in that.

And... Before someone comes along and points out the contradiction in this answer... I'm clearly not a role model. I'm painfully aware that I tend to view things a bit differently than the adverage pedant. The adverage pedant probably has very few tattoos, if any, and proabably no tragic tattoos... Embracing your mistakes is a skill learned by those that have the courage to make mistakes, but please make fewer mistakes than I tend to ;)

Pro-tip: Never get matching, names, or any tattoos that will be a forever reminder of someone.

With the exception of your own children, or perhaps mother, these kinds of tattoos are nearly always a bad idea. If/when you have a falling out, you're forever stuck with the tattoo. Good cover-up work is difficult to pull off, and lazer removal is expensive and painful. Well, both options are expensive and painful.

I made this mistake with a former partner. For an anniversary present we each got tattoos to commemorate the relationship. Different designs, but they both incorporated the same little heart. Mine used an awful lot of black, so a cover-up is pretty much a non-option, unless I want to get one of those blackout tattoos.

Relationships just aren't as permanent as tattoos. Regardless of whether it's a friend, lover, or family member, these tattoos have a nasty way of outlasting the relationships they're intended to remind you of...

So...

I think this may be one of those cases where it's probably going to be better to bite the bullet, accept that they're going to be upset with you and complain about it, and tell them the truth. This approach would also have the benefit of shedding a little light on the overly possessive tendency, in this friendship, that seems to be the real underlying problem.

It sounds like this whole tattoo idea is a symptom, not the disease. Curing the disease will probably require some uncomfortable, honest conversation with A about how she treats you and the other people in your life. Possessiveness isn't a great quality, but loyalty is. She may not recognize the distinction, so you may need to explain it to her.

Hey, we've been best friends for forever. I really value your loyalty, you've always been there for me when I needed a friend, but this possessive stuff is wearing a little thin...

The wording is of course optional. Just honestly communicate about what you're seeing and the problems it's causing, while being clear that you still value the friendship.


Then again... I suppose it has a bit to do with your philosophy surrounding tattooing. Is it a right of passage, is it a diary, a rememberence of things that you've lived through, or conquered, a collage of things you've found meaningful over the years, purely artistic expression, a catalog of poor choices... People get tattoos for a lot of reasons... But if you're the sort of person who is going to look at a particular tattoo with regrets many years from now, probably best to be cautious.

Personally, I have some tragic tattoos. I don't regret any of them, not even the anniversary tattoo. I don't want to die without any scars... I know that's pithy and trite, but it's how I get by. Our scars remind us who we are and where we've been, and I find a lot of value in that.

And... Before someone comes along and points out the contradiction in this answer... I'm clearly not a role model. I'm painfully aware that I tend to view things a bit differently than the adverage pedant. The adverage pedant probably has very few tattoos, if any, and proabably no tragic tattoos... Embracing your mistakes is a skill learned by those that have the courage to make mistakes, but please make fewer mistakes than I tend to ;)

Pro-tip: Never get matching, names, or any tattoos that will be a forever reminder of someone.

With the exception of your own children, or perhaps mother, these kinds of tattoos are nearly always a bad idea. If/when you have a falling out, you're forever stuck with the tattoo. Good cover-up work is difficult to pull off, and lazer removal is expensive and painful. Well, both options are expensive and painful.

I made this mistake with a former partner. For an anniversary present we each got tattoos to commemorate the relationship. Different designs, but they both incorporated the same little heart. Mine used an awful lot of black, so a cover-up is pretty much a non-option, unless I want to get one of those blackout tattoos.

Relationships just aren't as permanent as tattoos. Regardless of whether it's a friend, lover, or family member, these tattoos have a nasty way of outlasting the relationships they're intended to remind you of...

So...

I think this may be one of those cases where it's probably going to be better to bite the bullet, accept that they're going to be upset with you and complain about it, and tell them the truth. This approach would also have the benefit of shedding a little light on the overly possessive tendency, in this friendship, that seems to be the real underlying problem.

It sounds like this whole tattoo idea is a symptom, not the disease. Curing the disease will probably require some uncomfortable, honest conversation with A about how she treats you and the other people in your life. Possessiveness isn't a great quality, but loyalty is. She may not recognize the distinction, so you may need to explain it to her.

Hey, we've been best friends for forever. I really value your loyalty, you've always been there for me when I needed a friend, but this possessive stuff is wearing a little thin...

The wording is of course optional. Just honestly communicate about what you're seeing and the problems it's causing, while being clear that you still value the friendship.


Then again... I suppose it has a bit to do with your philosophy surrounding tattooing. Is it a rite of passage, is it a diary, a rememberence of things that you've lived through, or conquered, a collage of things you've found meaningful over the years, purely artistic expression, a catalog of poor choices... People get tattoos for a lot of reasons... But if you're the sort of person who is going to look at a particular tattoo with regrets many years from now, probably best to be cautious.

Personally, I have some tragic tattoos. I don't regret any of them, not even the anniversary tattoo. I don't want to die without any scars... I know that's pithy and trite, but it's how I get by. Our scars remind us who we are and where we've been, and I find a lot of value in that.

And... Before someone comes along and points out the contradiction in this answer... I'm clearly not a role model. I'm painfully aware that I tend to view things a bit differently than the adverage pedant. The adverage pedant probably has very few tattoos, if any, and proabably no tragic tattoos... Embracing your mistakes is a skill learned by those that have the courage to make mistakes, but please make fewer mistakes than I tend to ;)

2 added 1236 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link