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Disclaimer: though I am of Mexican heritage and visit Mexico often, my experience is not the end-all to Mexican culture. My family originates from the state of Oaxaca, which is a large exporter of coffee. Also, I have little insight into Columbia's culture. However, this is my experience:

Whenever I visit my Abuelita (grandmother) in Mexico, the coffee in her house is always Nescafe. Also, the small, authentic, "hole-in-the-wall" Mexican restaurant that serves authentic Mexican food is usually family run and operated. Therefore, the coffee is often times what the family uses in their home, which is usually Nescafe. When you ordered black coffee, they assumed just the run-of-the-mill cup of coffee they'd have in their home. Like @Daniel stated, classic cultural mix-up.

Personally, I'd refrain from providing feedback about their menu and how it's stated. Providing feedback may be construed as insulting, especially if you are of a different culture or ethnicity. It can be viewed as you saying, "What you serve in your home is not good enough for me, and therefore your food is not good enough for me." In the future, I suggest asking what kind of coffee they're serving, whether it be freshly ground of instant coffee, or ask if they have other coffee drinks like cappuccino, espresso, etc.

Here's a link to an article called "Is There Anything Besides Nescafe in Mexico?", I hope it provides clarification!

Disclaimer: though I am of Mexican heritage and visit Mexico often, my experience is not the end-all to Mexican culture. My family originates from the state of Oaxaca, which is a large exporter of coffee. Also, I have little insight into Columbia's culture. However, this is my experience:

Whenever I visit my Abuelita (grandmother) in Mexico, the coffee in her house is always Nescafe. Also, the small, authentic, "hole-in-the-wall" Mexican restaurant that serves authentic Mexican food is usually family run and operated. Therefore, the coffee is often times what the family uses in their home, which is usually Nescafe. When you ordered black coffee, they assumed just the run-of-the-mill cup of coffee they'd have in their home. Like @Daniel stated, classic cultural mix-up.

Personally, I'd refrain from providing feedback about their menu and how it's stated. Providing feedback may be construed as insulting, especially if you are of a different culture or ethnicity. In the future, I suggest asking what kind of coffee they're serving, whether it be freshly ground of instant coffee, or ask if they have other coffee drinks like cappuccino, espresso, etc.

Here's a link to an article called "Is There Anything Besides Nescafe in Mexico?", I hope it provides clarification!

Disclaimer: though I am of Mexican heritage and visit Mexico often, my experience is not the end-all to Mexican culture. My family originates from the state of Oaxaca, which is a large exporter of coffee. Also, I have little insight into Columbia's culture. However, this is my experience:

Whenever I visit my Abuelita (grandmother) in Mexico, the coffee in her house is always Nescafe. Also, the small, authentic, "hole-in-the-wall" Mexican restaurant that serves authentic Mexican food is usually family run and operated. Therefore, the coffee is often times what the family uses in their home, which is usually Nescafe. When you ordered black coffee, they assumed just the run-of-the-mill cup of coffee they'd have in their home. Like @Daniel stated, classic cultural mix-up.

Personally, I'd refrain from providing feedback about their menu and how it's stated. Providing feedback may be construed as insulting, especially if you are of a different culture or ethnicity. It can be viewed as you saying, "What you serve in your home is not good enough for me, and therefore your food is not good enough for me." In the future, I suggest asking what kind of coffee they're serving, whether it be freshly ground of instant coffee, or ask if they have other coffee drinks like cappuccino, espresso, etc.

Here's a link to an article called "Is There Anything Besides Nescafe in Mexico?", I hope it provides clarification!

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Disclaimer: though I am of Mexican heritage and visit Mexico often, my experience is not the end-all to Mexican culture. My family originates from the state of Oaxaca, which is a large exporter of coffee. Also, I have little insight into Columbia's culture. However, this is my experience:

Whenever I visit my Abuelita (grandmother) in Mexico, the coffee in her house is always Nescafe. Also, the small, authentic, "hole-in-the-wall" Mexican restaurant that serves authentic Mexican food is usually family run and operated. Therefore, the coffee is often times what the family uses in their home, which is usually Nescafe. When you ordered black coffee, they assumed just the run-of-the-mill cup of coffee they'd have in their home. Like @Daniel stated, classic cultural mix-up.

Personally, I'd refrain from providing feedback about their menu and how it's stated. Providing feedback may be construed as insulting, especially if you are of a different culture or ethnicity. In the future, I suggest asking what kind of coffee they're serving, whether it be freshly ground of instant coffee, or ask if they have other coffee drinks like cappuccino, espresso, etc.

Here's a link to an article called "Is There Anything Besides Nescafe in Mexico?", I hope it provides clarification!