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Even after reading your story and all of your comments, it's difficult to understand why someone would act in this way. It's not clear what your appearance -- dressing up or down -- has to do with your perceived knowledge of cooking or politics.

The only thing that makes sense is to assume that person is envious of your appearance and wants to belittle you, in order to make themselves feel superior. Although you might think this behavior childish, unfortunately, it's fairly common, and can be difficult to avoid.

Although it may not seem like it, it's actually a kind of compliment. The person casting aspersions wouldn't do so if they didn't think you have unusually good style. They'd just leave you alone and not consider you a threat.

So first, take it as a kind of weird compliment. That should keep it from bothering you as much. Feel free to take it by it'sassume literally meaning, and ignore any nastiness behind itnasty subtext.

Here are some examples of responses you can use in either situation:

How nice of you to think that, but actually I don't know anything about it.

Why makes you think that? Of course, I'd love to be an expert on it, but I don't think I know any more than you do.

Really? Well, I know a little bit about (subject) but I haven't really spent much time studying it.

In the specific case where you go to someone for their advice, and they respond to the effect of, "Someone like you should know that!"

I'm flattered you think that way, but I'm completely lost. That's why I came to you, because you seem to by the expert here

Side note: One reason people are nasty to those they are envious of, is because they assume that you are first going to be nasty to them, possibly because you look better. It's what I call a self-creating belief system, because naturally many people will respond to nastiness with nastiness.

Again, this is a kind of schoolyard behavior some people never outgrow -- but you can sometimes break the cycle by always being nice, and sincerely compliment the other person. It doesn't always work (or it might take a long time to work) but it can often make you feel better, to know that you are trying to create harmony among your coworkers, rather than sow additional discord.

Even after reading your story and all of your comments, it's difficult to understand why someone would act in this way. It's not clear what your appearance -- dressing up or down -- has to do with your perceived knowledge of cooking or politics.

The only thing that makes sense is to assume that person is envious of your appearance and wants to belittle you, in order to make themselves feel superior. Although you might think this behavior childish, unfortunately, it's fairly common, and can be difficult to avoid.

Although it may not seem like it, it's actually a kind of compliment. The person casting aspersions wouldn't do so if they didn't think you have unusually good style. They'd just leave you alone and not consider you a threat.

So first, take it as a kind of weird compliment. That should keep it from bothering you as much. Feel free to take it by it's literally meaning, and ignore any nastiness behind it.

Here are some examples of responses you can use in either situation:

How nice of you to think that, but actually I don't know anything about it.

Why makes you think that? Of course, I'd love to be an expert on it, but I don't think I know any more than you do.

Really? Well, I know a little bit about (subject) but I haven't really spent much time studying it.

In the specific case where you go to someone for their advice, and they respond to the effect of, "Someone like you should know that!"

I'm flattered you think that way, but I'm completely lost. That's why I came to you, because you seem to by the expert here

Side note: One reason people are nasty to those they are envious of, is because they assume that you are first going to be nasty to them, possibly because you look better. It's what I call a self-creating belief system, because naturally many people will respond to nastiness with nastiness.

Again, this is a kind of schoolyard behavior some people never outgrow -- but you can sometimes break the cycle by always being nice, and sincerely compliment the other person. It doesn't always work (or it might take a long time to work) but it can often make you feel better, to know that you are trying to create harmony among your coworkers, rather than sow additional discord.

Even after reading your story and all of your comments, it's difficult to understand why someone would act in this way. It's not clear what your appearance -- dressing up or down -- has to do with your perceived knowledge of cooking or politics.

The only thing that makes sense is to assume that person is envious of your appearance and wants to belittle you, in order to make themselves feel superior. Although you might think this behavior childish, unfortunately, it's fairly common, and can be difficult to avoid.

Although it may not seem like it, it's actually a kind of compliment. The person casting aspersions wouldn't do so if they didn't think you have unusually good style. They'd just leave you alone and not consider you a threat.

So first, take it as a kind of weird compliment. That should keep it from bothering you as much. Feel free to assume literally meaning, and ignore any nasty subtext.

Here are some examples of responses you can use in either situation:

How nice of you to think that, but actually I don't know anything about it.

Why makes you think that? Of course, I'd love to be an expert on it, but I don't think I know any more than you do.

Really? Well, I know a little bit about (subject) but I haven't really spent much time studying it.

In the specific case where you go to someone for their advice, and they respond to the effect of, "Someone like you should know that!"

I'm flattered you think that way, but I'm completely lost. That's why I came to you, because you seem to by the expert here

Side note: One reason people are nasty to those they are envious of, is because they assume that you are first going to be nasty to them, possibly because you look better. It's what I call a self-creating belief system, because naturally many people will respond to nastiness with nastiness.

Again, this is a kind of schoolyard behavior some people never outgrow -- but you can sometimes break the cycle by always being nice, and sincerely compliment the other person. It doesn't always work (or it might take a long time to work) but it can often make you feel better, to know that you are trying to create harmony among your coworkers, rather than sow additional discord.

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Even after reading your story and all of your comments, it's difficult to understand why someone would act in this way. It's not clear what your appearance -- dressing up or down -- has to do with your perceived knowledge of cooking or politics.

The only thing that makes sense is to assume that person is envious of your appearance and wants to belittle you, in order to make themselves feel superior. Although you might think this behavior childish, unfortunately, it's fairly common, and can be difficult to avoid.

Although it may not seem like it, it's actually a kind of compliment. The person casting aspersions wouldn't do so if they didn't think you have unusually good style. They'd just leave you alone and not consider you a threat.

So first, take it as a kind of weird compliment. That should keep it from bothering you as much. Feel free to take it by it's literally meaning, and ignore any nastiness behind it.

Here are some examples of responses you can use in either situation:

How nice of you to think that, but actually I don't know anything about it.

Why makes you think that? Of course, I'd love to be an expert on it, but I don't think I know any more than you do.

Really? Well, I know a little bit about (subject) but I haven't really spent much time studying it.

In the specific case where you go to someone for their advice, and they respond to the effect of, "Someone like you should know that!"

I'm flattered you think that way, but I'm completely lost. That's why I came to you, because you seem to by the expert here

Side note: One reason people are nasty to those they are envious of, is because they assume that you are first going to be nasty to them, possibly because you look better. It's what I call a self-creating belief system, because naturally many people will respond to nastiness with nastiness.

Again, this is a kind of schoolyard behavior some people never outgrow -- but you can sometimes break the cycle by always being nice, and sincerely compliment the other person. It doesn't always work (or it might take a long time to work) but it can often make you feel better, to know that you are trying to create harmony among your coworkers, rather than sow additional discord.