Post Reopened by Lord Farquaad, Andrew, TheRealLester, Upper_Case, Flo
2 Narrowed scope
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The flip-side to this question about being asked one's opinion on food they didn't like;

What things should you keep in mind if you have cooked or are cooking a meal for family or friends, and would like their honest opinion of it, for future or immediate reference?

I love cooking, and understandFor a number of reasons that people's palates can differ from minegenerally boil down to politeness, so if someone weremost adults seem reluctant to express their true feelings about food they've been served - the only metric I can often get is if they enthusiastically tell me how good it was, then they didn't like my cooking at allprobably enjoyed it, while I would feel badand if they say nothing, or only complement the smell, or the decor, or how well the napkins are folded, then they probably didn't. In that latter case though, I subjected them to somethingstill don't know what they didn't enjoylike, I wouldn't feel hurt or insultedwhat I should do better in the future.  

I'd really like to minimize the mutual-loss where I sacrificetake time to cook for someone, and they force themselves to pretend to likeenjoy it. Especially important would be gettingrequesting honest feedback if I'm not done cooking yet, and so somewhen changes could still be made.

This probably has a couple different combinationsThe main sets of cases (with some overlap)circumstances that I think would require different methods/responses:

  • People for whom you cook often/regularly
  • Friends whom you've invited over for dinner
  • People you don't know very well (perhaps a friend-of-a-friend)
  • Asking someone their opinion in the midst of the cooking process, versus at the end of the meal.
  • People who know I won't take criticism personally, versus people whoyou don't see often
  • People who can cook things they themselves like, versus people who, while they know when something doesn't taste good to them, don't really know enough about cooking to give recommendations on how to improve it could/should be improved

The flip-side to this question about being asked one's opinion on food they didn't like;

What things should you keep in mind if you have cooked or are cooking a meal for family or friends, and would like their honest opinion of it, for future or immediate reference?

I love cooking, and understand that people's palates can differ from mine, so if someone were to tell me they didn't like my cooking at all, while I would feel bad that I subjected them to something they didn't enjoy, I wouldn't feel hurt or insulted.  

I'd really like to minimize the mutual-loss where I sacrifice time to cook for someone, and they force themselves to pretend to like it. Especially important would be getting honest feedback if I'm not done cooking yet, and so some changes could still be made.

This probably has a couple different combinations of cases (with some overlap):

  • People for whom you cook often/regularly
  • Friends whom you've invited over for dinner
  • People you don't know very well (perhaps a friend-of-a-friend)
  • Asking someone their opinion in the midst of the cooking process, versus at the end of the meal.
  • People who know I won't take criticism personally, versus people who don't
  • People who can cook, versus people who, while they know when something doesn't taste good to them, don't know enough about cooking to give recommendations on how to improve it

The flip-side to this question about being asked one's opinion on food they didn't like;

What things should you keep in mind if you have cooked or are cooking a meal for family or friends, and would like their honest opinion of it, for future or immediate reference?

For a number of reasons that generally boil down to politeness, most adults seem reluctant to express their true feelings about food they've been served - the only metric I can often get is if they enthusiastically tell me how good it was, then they probably enjoyed it, and if they say nothing, or only complement the smell, or the decor, or how well the napkins are folded, then they probably didn't. In that latter case though, I still don't know what they didn't like, or what I should do better in the future.

I'd really like to minimize the mutual-loss where I take time to cook for someone, and they force themselves to pretend to enjoy it. Especially important would be requesting honest feedback if I'm not done cooking yet, when changes could still be made.

The main sets of circumstances that I think would require different methods/responses:

  • People for whom you cook often/regularly, versus people you don't see often
  • People who can cook things they themselves like, versus people who, while they know when something doesn't taste good to them, don't really know how it could/should be improved
    Post Closed as "too broad" by Kaspar Scherrer, Flo, Chilly, avazula, TheRealLester
1
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How do you get someone's honest opinion about your cooking?

The flip-side to this question about being asked one's opinion on food they didn't like;

What things should you keep in mind if you have cooked or are cooking a meal for family or friends, and would like their honest opinion of it, for future or immediate reference?

I love cooking, and understand that people's palates can differ from mine, so if someone were to tell me they didn't like my cooking at all, while I would feel bad that I subjected them to something they didn't enjoy, I wouldn't feel hurt or insulted.

I'd really like to minimize the mutual-loss where I sacrifice time to cook for someone, and they force themselves to pretend to like it. Especially important would be getting honest feedback if I'm not done cooking yet, and so some changes could still be made.

This probably has a couple different combinations of cases (with some overlap):

  • People for whom you cook often/regularly
  • Friends whom you've invited over for dinner
  • People you don't know very well (perhaps a friend-of-a-friend)
  • Asking someone their opinion in the midst of the cooking process, versus at the end of the meal.
  • People who know I won't take criticism personally, versus people who don't
  • People who can cook, versus people who, while they know when something doesn't taste good to them, don't know enough about cooking to give recommendations on how to improve it