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A lot of the other answer here doesn't seem to follow the "tactfully check' element. That means you want an objective independent source of information; asking is not checking. Asking opens the door to lying or misrepresentation. Objective checking bypass at least one layer of deception. Notambiguity and not to mention the most important aspect it can cause irreversible offense. The average person would get offended with that question (which is why the OP is asking the question here). I would imagine if your answer is "simply ask" then you haven't really read the OP's question.

Also, it's important to know that the OP is trying to find out biologically which sex the person is. The OP wants to know what to physically expect, not the self-identification aspect. So asking would likely either offend the person or get you the person's gender and not their biological sex.

What I would do is to show them your funny looking identity card of sorts and have a laugh about it... Then you claim that it's unfair that they have seen you but not the other way around, at this point, hopefully they would shyly produce their ID card and then you can freely check out how old they are and which natural sex they are.

Another super easy method that you can use is simply ask to add them on social media. There must be clues in their pictures and/or how their friends interact with them. Pronouns and clothing, for example... Or how their family/friends addresses them (brother/sister/son/daughter/my girl/my boy).

=== Proof that ID are more likely to be correct than asking ===

Premise 1 : Your ID naturally shows your birth sex.

Premise 2 : Not 100% of the country allows you to change your birth sex.

Premise 3 : If someone doesn't want to tell yourcares about concealing their naturebirth sex enough to alter their government ID, then it follows that they will lie / change their IDnot simply tell you the truth just like that.

Situation 1: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as male. Both asking and Checking ID both give correct SEX (male).

Situation 2: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as female. Asking gets you GENDER (female), checking gets you the native sex (male).

Situation 3: Person is XY, ID is changed to say XX, he identifies as female. Both Asking and Checking ID give you incorrect sex (female).

Thus, checking ID is "at least as correct" as asking and in some cases, more correct.

A lot of the other answer here doesn't seem to follow the "tactfully check' element. That means you want an objective independent source of information; asking is not checking. Asking opens the door to lying or misrepresentation. Objective checking bypass at least one layer of deception. Not to mention the most important aspect. The average person would get offended with that question (which is why the OP is asking the question here). I would imagine if your answer is "simply ask" then you haven't read the OP's question.

Also, it's important to know that the OP is trying to find out biologically which sex the person is. The OP wants to know what to physically expect, not the self-identification aspect. So asking would likely either offend the person or get you the person's gender and not their biological sex.

What I would do is to show them your funny looking identity card of sorts and have a laugh about it... Then you claim that it's unfair that they have seen you but not the other way around, at this point, hopefully they would shyly produce their ID card and then you can freely check out how old they are and which natural sex they are.

Another super easy method that you can use is simply ask to add them on social media. There must be clues in their pictures and/or how their friends interact with them. Pronouns and clothing, for example... Or how their family/friends addresses them (brother/sister/son/daughter/my girl/my boy).

=== Proof that ID are more likely to be correct than asking ===

Premise 1 : Your ID naturally shows your birth sex.

Premise 2 : Not 100% of the country allows you to change your birth sex.

Premise 3 : If someone doesn't want to tell your their nature sex, they will lie / change their ID.

Situation 1: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as male. Both asking and Checking ID both give correct SEX (male).

Situation 2: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as female. Asking gets you GENDER (female), checking gets you the native sex (male).

Situation 3: Person is XY, ID is changed to say XX, he identifies as female. Both Asking and Checking ID give you incorrect sex (female).

Thus, checking ID is "at least as correct" as asking and in some cases, more correct.

A lot of the other answer here doesn't seem to follow the "tactfully check' element. That means you want an objective independent source of information; asking is not checking. Asking opens the door to ambiguity and not to mention the most important aspect it can cause irreversible offense. The average person would get offended with that question (which is why the OP is asking the question here). I would imagine if your answer is "simply ask" then you haven't really read the OP's question.

Also, it's important to know that the OP is trying to find out biologically which sex the person is. The OP wants to know what to physically expect, not the self-identification aspect. So asking would likely either offend the person or get you the person's gender and not their biological sex.

What I would do is to show them your funny looking identity card of sorts and have a laugh about it... Then you claim that it's unfair that they have seen you but not the other way around, at this point, hopefully they would shyly produce their ID card and then you can freely check out how old they are and which natural sex they are.

Another super easy method that you can use is simply ask to add them on social media. There must be clues in their pictures and/or how their friends interact with them. Pronouns and clothing, for example... Or how their family/friends addresses them (brother/sister/son/daughter/my girl/my boy).

=== Proof that ID are more likely to be correct than asking ===

Premise 1 : Your ID naturally shows your birth sex.

Premise 2 : Not 100% of the country allows you to change your birth sex.

Premise 3 : If someone cares about concealing their birth sex enough to alter their government ID, then it follows that they will not simply tell you the truth just like that.

Situation 1: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as male. Both asking and Checking ID both give correct SEX (male).

Situation 2: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as female. Asking gets you GENDER (female), checking gets you the native sex (male).

Situation 3: Person is XY, ID is changed to say XX, he identifies as female. Both Asking and Checking ID give you incorrect sex (female).

Thus, checking ID is "at least as correct" as asking and in some cases, more correct.

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A lot of the other answer here doesn't seem to follow the "tactfully check' element. That means you want an objective independent source of information; asking is not checking. Asking opens the door to lying or misrepresentation. Objective checking bypass at least one layer of deception. Not to mention the most important aspect. The average person would get offended with that question (which is why the OP is asking the question here). I would imagine if your answer is "simply ask" then you haven't read the OP's question.

Also, it's important to know that the OP is trying to find out biologically which sex the person is. The OP wants to know what to physically expect, not the self-identification aspect. So asking would likely either offend the person or get you the person's gender and not their biological sex.

What I would do is to show them your funny looking identity card of sorts and have a laugh about it... Then you claim that it's unfair that they have seen you but not the other way around, at this point, hopefully they would shyly produce their ID card and then you can freely check out how old they are and which natural sex they are.

Honestly, there are so many ways. You can also talk about their childhood, or just engage in any normal discussion. There are always points in which you can interject a question that will help identify their sex. For example, talk about a recent sexist scandal involving some big name figure. See how the conversation unfolds, are they suggesting similar experiences? Do they say things like "Men like that is what make other men look bad. We need to stand up and call out toxic masculinity whenever we see it from other guys..." or "as the one of the few girls who work in my office, I often..."

Another super easy method that you can use is simply ask to add them on social media. There must be clues in their pictures and/or how their friends interact with them. Pronouns and clothing, for example... Or how their family/friends addresses them (brother/sister/son/daughter/my girl/my boy).

There MUST be telltale signs or at least you should be able to detect spots where you can logically deduce what they are.  

=== Proof that ID are more likely to be correct than asking ===

Premise 1 : Your ID naturally shows your birth sex.

Premise 2 : Not 100% of the country allows you to change your birth sex.

Premise 3 : If someone doesn't want to tell your their nature sex, they will lie / change their ID.

Situation 1: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as male. Both asking and Checking ID both give correct SEX (male).

Situation 2: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as female. Asking gets you GENDER (female), checking gets you the native sex (male).

Situation 3: Person is XY, ID is changed to say XX, he identifies as female. Both Asking and Checking ID give you incorrect sex (female).

Thus, checking ID is "at least as correct" as asking and in some cases, more correct.

A lot of the other answer here doesn't seem to follow the "tactfully check' element. That means you want an objective independent source of information; asking is not checking. Asking opens the door to lying or misrepresentation. Objective checking bypass at least one layer of deception. Not to mention the most important aspect. The average person would get offended with that question (which is why the OP is asking the question here). I would imagine if your answer is "simply ask" then you haven't read the OP's question.

What I would do is to show them your funny looking identity card of sorts and have a laugh about it... Then you claim that it's unfair that they have seen you but not the other way around, at this point, hopefully they would shyly produce their ID card and then you can freely check out how old they are and which natural sex they are.

Honestly, there are so many ways. You can also talk about their childhood, or just engage in any normal discussion. There are always points in which you can interject a question that will help identify their sex. For example, talk about a recent sexist scandal involving some big name figure. See how the conversation unfolds, are they suggesting similar experiences? Do they say things like "Men like that is what make other men look bad. We need to stand up and call out toxic masculinity whenever we see it from other guys..." or "as the one of the few girls who work in my office, I often..."

Another super easy method that you can use is simply ask to add them on social media. There must be clues in their pictures and/or how their friends interact with them. Pronouns and clothing, for example... Or how their family/friends addresses them (brother/sister/son/daughter/my girl/my boy).

There MUST be telltale signs or at least you should be able to detect spots where you can logically deduce what they are.  

=== Proof that ID are more likely to be correct than asking ===

Premise 1 : Your ID naturally shows your birth sex.

Premise 2 : Not 100% of the country allows you to change your birth sex.

Premise 3 : If someone doesn't want to tell your their nature sex, they will lie / change their ID.

Situation 1: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as male. Both asking and Checking ID both give correct SEX (male).

Situation 2: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as female. Asking gets you GENDER (female), checking gets you the native sex (male).

Situation 3: Person is XY, ID is changed to say XX, he identifies as female. Both Asking and Checking ID give you incorrect sex (female).

Thus, checking ID is "at least as correct" as asking and in some cases, more correct.

A lot of the other answer here doesn't seem to follow the "tactfully check' element. That means you want an objective independent source of information; asking is not checking. Asking opens the door to lying or misrepresentation. Objective checking bypass at least one layer of deception. Not to mention the most important aspect. The average person would get offended with that question (which is why the OP is asking the question here). I would imagine if your answer is "simply ask" then you haven't read the OP's question.

Also, it's important to know that the OP is trying to find out biologically which sex the person is. The OP wants to know what to physically expect, not the self-identification aspect. So asking would likely either offend the person or get you the person's gender and not their biological sex.

What I would do is to show them your funny looking identity card of sorts and have a laugh about it... Then you claim that it's unfair that they have seen you but not the other way around, at this point, hopefully they would shyly produce their ID card and then you can freely check out how old they are and which natural sex they are.

Another super easy method that you can use is simply ask to add them on social media. There must be clues in their pictures and/or how their friends interact with them. Pronouns and clothing, for example... Or how their family/friends addresses them (brother/sister/son/daughter/my girl/my boy).

=== Proof that ID are more likely to be correct than asking ===

Premise 1 : Your ID naturally shows your birth sex.

Premise 2 : Not 100% of the country allows you to change your birth sex.

Premise 3 : If someone doesn't want to tell your their nature sex, they will lie / change their ID.

Situation 1: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as male. Both asking and Checking ID both give correct SEX (male).

Situation 2: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as female. Asking gets you GENDER (female), checking gets you the native sex (male).

Situation 3: Person is XY, ID is changed to say XX, he identifies as female. Both Asking and Checking ID give you incorrect sex (female).

Thus, checking ID is "at least as correct" as asking and in some cases, more correct.

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source | link

A lot of the other answer here doesn't seem to follow the "tactfully check' element. That means you want an objective independent source of information; asking is not checking. Asking opens the door to lying or misrepresentation. Objective checking bypass at least one layer of deception. Not to mention the most important aspect. The average person would get offended with that question (which is why the OP is asking the question here). I would imagine if your answer is "simply ask" then you haven't read the OP's question.

What I would do is to show them your funny looking identity card of sorts and have a laugh about it... Then you claim that it's unfair that they have seen you but not the other way around, at this point, hopefully they would shyly produce their ID card and then you can freely check out how old they are and which natural sex they are.

Honestly, there are so many ways. You can also talk about their childhood, or just engage in any normal discussion. There are always points in which you can interject a question that will help identify their sex. For example, talk about a recent sexist scandal involving some big name figure. See how the conversation unfolds, are they suggesting similar experiences? Do they say things like "Men like that is what make other men look bad. We need to stand up and call out toxic masculinity whenever we see it from other guys..." or "as the one of the few girls who work in my office, I often..."

Another super easy method that you can use is simply ask to add them on social media. There must be clues in their pictures and/or how their friends interact with them. Pronouns and clothing, for example... Or how their family/friends addresses them (brother/sister/son/daughter/my girl/my boy).

There MUST be telltale signs or at least you should be able to detect spots where you can logically deduce what they are.

=== Proof that ID are more likely to be correct than asking ===

Premise 1 : Your ID naturally shows your birth sex.

Premise 2 : Not 100% of the country allows you to change your birth sex.

Premise 3 : If someone doesn't want to tell your their nature sex, they will lie / change their ID.

Situation 1: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as male. Both asking and Checking ID both give correct SEX (male).

Situation 2: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as female. Asking gets you GENDER (female), checking gets you the native sex (male).

Situation 3: Person is XY, ID is changed to say XX, he identifies as female. Both Asking and Checking ID give you incorrect sex (female).

Thus, checking ID is "at least as correct" as asking and in some cases, more correct.

A lot of the other answer here doesn't seem to follow the "tactfully check' element. That means you want an objective independent source of information; asking is not checking. Asking opens the door to lying or misrepresentation. Objective checking bypass at least one layer of deception. Not to mention the most important aspect. The average person would get offended with that question (which is why the OP is asking the question here). I would imagine if your answer is "simply ask" then you haven't read the OP's question.

What I would do is to show them your funny looking identity card of sorts and have a laugh about it... Then you claim that it's unfair that they have seen you but not the other way around, at this point, hopefully they would shyly produce their ID card and then you can freely check out how old they are and which natural sex they are.

Honestly, there are so many ways. You can also talk about their childhood, or just engage in any normal discussion. There are always points in which you can interject a question that will help identify their sex. For example, talk about a recent sexist scandal involving some big name figure. See how the conversation unfolds, are they suggesting similar experiences? Do they say things like "Men like that is what make other men look bad. We need to stand up and call out toxic masculinity whenever we see it from other guys..." or "as the one of the few girls who work in my office, I often..."

Another super easy method that you can use is simply ask to add them on social media. There must be clues in their pictures and/or how their friends interact with them. Pronouns and clothing, for example... Or how their family/friends addresses them (brother/sister/son/daughter/my girl/my boy).

There MUST be telltale signs or at least you should be able to detect spots where you can logically deduce what they are.

A lot of the other answer here doesn't seem to follow the "tactfully check' element. That means you want an objective independent source of information; asking is not checking. Asking opens the door to lying or misrepresentation. Objective checking bypass at least one layer of deception. Not to mention the most important aspect. The average person would get offended with that question (which is why the OP is asking the question here). I would imagine if your answer is "simply ask" then you haven't read the OP's question.

What I would do is to show them your funny looking identity card of sorts and have a laugh about it... Then you claim that it's unfair that they have seen you but not the other way around, at this point, hopefully they would shyly produce their ID card and then you can freely check out how old they are and which natural sex they are.

Honestly, there are so many ways. You can also talk about their childhood, or just engage in any normal discussion. There are always points in which you can interject a question that will help identify their sex. For example, talk about a recent sexist scandal involving some big name figure. See how the conversation unfolds, are they suggesting similar experiences? Do they say things like "Men like that is what make other men look bad. We need to stand up and call out toxic masculinity whenever we see it from other guys..." or "as the one of the few girls who work in my office, I often..."

Another super easy method that you can use is simply ask to add them on social media. There must be clues in their pictures and/or how their friends interact with them. Pronouns and clothing, for example... Or how their family/friends addresses them (brother/sister/son/daughter/my girl/my boy).

There MUST be telltale signs or at least you should be able to detect spots where you can logically deduce what they are.

=== Proof that ID are more likely to be correct than asking ===

Premise 1 : Your ID naturally shows your birth sex.

Premise 2 : Not 100% of the country allows you to change your birth sex.

Premise 3 : If someone doesn't want to tell your their nature sex, they will lie / change their ID.

Situation 1: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as male. Both asking and Checking ID both give correct SEX (male).

Situation 2: Person is XY, ID still says XY, he identifies as female. Asking gets you GENDER (female), checking gets you the native sex (male).

Situation 3: Person is XY, ID is changed to say XX, he identifies as female. Both Asking and Checking ID give you incorrect sex (female).

Thus, checking ID is "at least as correct" as asking and in some cases, more correct.

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