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This kind of dissent is futile in the workplace. When you join a software development team, you will be told what application will be used for group communication, and you are expected to take whatever steps are necessary to ensure you can participate.

The point of team-based assignments is so students can understand how teams integrate and produce software out in the real world. Which is to say, if the majority of the team have chosen to use Discord, then the dissenter should go along with the group decision.

Period. End of debate. You need to move quickly past these kind of petty details in order to get the real work done.

Just say to the lone holdout:

You understand that the rest of us have joined this server, and if you choose not to join, you won't be part of the discussion? We have to pick a tool and go with it, otherwise you're just holding the rest of us back.

As a side note, I agree that group text and Facebook are not good alternatives for software development. I don't know that Discord is either, at least compared with more common tools like Slack, but then again it's not a bad idea to use something you're familiar with so it doesn't distract from building your project.

(Edit) in response to the assertion that I'm being "impolite": Sorry, but the earlier developers learn this lesson, the better. Out in the real world individuals normally won't get their own way -- the point of team projects is to teach students about the inevitability of compromise. The team has a job to do, and the more one member wastes time with trivial objections, the more likely that person will be let go because they don't fit in.

Moreover the suggestion of group text or even Facebook for team communication suggests this person is very new to the field and needs to get up to speed. Might as well get familiar with something like Slack now, because they're going to be using something like it the rest of their career.

This kind of dissent is futile in the workplace. When you join a software development team, you will be told what application will be used for group communication, and you are expected to take whatever steps are necessary to ensure you can participate.

The point of team-based assignments is so students can understand how teams integrate and produce software out in the real world. Which is to say, if the majority of the team have chosen to use Discord, then the dissenter should go along with the group decision.

Period. End of debate. You need to move quickly past these kind of petty details in order to get the real work done.

Just say to the lone holdout:

You understand that the rest of us have joined this server, and if you choose not to join, you won't be part of the discussion? We have to pick a tool and go with it, otherwise you're just holding the rest of us back.

As a side note, I agree that group text and Facebook are not good alternatives for software development. I don't know that Discord is either, at least compared with more common tools like Slack, but then again it's not a bad idea to use something you're familiar with so it doesn't distract from building your project.

This kind of dissent is futile in the workplace. When you join a software development team, you will be told what application will be used for group communication, and you are expected to take whatever steps are necessary to ensure you can participate.

The point of team-based assignments is so students can understand how teams integrate and produce software out in the real world. Which is to say, if the majority of the team have chosen to use Discord, then the dissenter should go along with the group decision.

Period. End of debate. You need to move quickly past these kind of petty details in order to get the real work done.

Just say to the lone holdout:

You understand that the rest of us have joined this server, and if you choose not to join, you won't be part of the discussion? We have to pick a tool and go with it, otherwise you're just holding the rest of us back.

As a side note, I agree that group text and Facebook are not good alternatives for software development. I don't know that Discord is either, at least compared with more common tools like Slack, but then again it's not a bad idea to use something you're familiar with so it doesn't distract from building your project.

(Edit) in response to the assertion that I'm being "impolite": Sorry, but the earlier developers learn this lesson, the better. Out in the real world individuals normally won't get their own way -- the point of team projects is to teach students about the inevitability of compromise. The team has a job to do, and the more one member wastes time with trivial objections, the more likely that person will be let go because they don't fit in.

Moreover the suggestion of group text or even Facebook for team communication suggests this person is very new to the field and needs to get up to speed. Might as well get familiar with something like Slack now, because they're going to be using something like it the rest of their career.

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This kind of dissent is futile in the workplace. When you join a software development team, you will be told what application will be used for group communication, and you are expected to take whatever steps are necessary to ensure you can participate.

The point of team-based assignments is so students can understand how teams integrate and produce software out in the real world. Which is to say, if the majority of the team have chosen to use Discord, then the dissenter should go along with the group decision.

Period. End of debate. You need to move quickly past these kind of petty details in order to get the real work done.

Just say to the lone holdout:

You understand that the rest of us have joined this server, and if you choose not to join, you won't be part of the discussion? We have to pick a tool and go with it, otherwise you're just holding the rest of us back.

As a side note, I agree that group text and Facebook are not good alternatives for software development. I don't know that Discord is either, at least compared with more common tools like Slack, but then again it's not a bad idea to use something you're familiar with so it doesn't distract from building your project.