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Autism is understood today in a way that it never was in the past, which is why so many kids are getting a diagnosis, but also why so many adults that may be on the autism spectrum were never diagnosed.

You point out that there is a clear difference between thinking you are on the autism spectrum and actually getting a professional diagnosis, so presumably your goal is to encourage your friend to get a proper diganosis, not just think it of themselves. But you also say that this friend gave you the information and tools to discover this about yourself, so the likelihood is that your friend already suspects it of their self.

Some adults have found it beneficial to get a professional diagnosis later in life because it helps them understand themselves better, explain themselves to others, and even get some support if needed. Others, however, prefer not to seek a late diagnosis. Even if they suspect they might be on the spectrum, they may feel that they have learned how to deal with life, found their place in society, are happy with their friends, job etc, and do not require a label at this stage in their life.

If you do talk to them about it you are likely going to find yourself in a situation where you don't have to convince them that they might be, but rather talking about whether or not they should get a professional diagnosis. This may or may not be helpful for your friend and is their personal decision.

So, by all means, have the conversation, but don't tell anyone directly that they are definitely autistic unless you are qualified to do so. Neither should you force anyone to get a professional diagnosis if they don't really need or want it.

You could perhaps just say:

I really want to thank you for the information about autism that you sent to me. It helped me understand myself. I think that getting a diagnosis might be beneficial to me because I have a need to understand myself better.

This might just encourage your friend who may suspect the same about their self to do the same thing.

If you really want to force the subject, the most gentle way might be:

Have you ever thought that you might be on the autism spectrum yourself?

This is less direct than saying you think they are autistic, and less likely to cause offence if they do not believe they are.

Just one final point, and I hope you feel this is fair - you say yourself that it is usual for "people on the autism spectrum to not understand what a neurotypical person is saying because we (people on the autism spectrum) don't have the same way of thinking". So with this in mind, would it be fair to say that someone with autism could misinterpret the words or actions of a neurotypical person to be autism? You might actually be the least qualified person to say someone else is autistic or not.

Autism is understood today in a way that it never was in the past, which is why so many kids are getting a diagnosis, but also why so many adults that may be on the autism spectrum were never diagnosed.

You point out that there is a clear difference between thinking you are on the autism spectrum and actually getting a professional diagnosis, so presumably your goal is to encourage your friend to get a proper diganosis, not just think it of themselves. But you also say that this friend gave you the information and tools to discover this about yourself, so the likelihood is that your friend already suspects it of their self.

Some adults have found it beneficial to get a professional diagnosis later in life because it helps them understand themselves better, explain themselves to others, and even get some support if needed. Others, however, prefer not to seek a late diagnosis. Even if they suspect they might be on the spectrum, they may feel that they have learned how to deal with life, found their place in society, are happy with their friends, job etc, and do not require a label at this stage in their life.

If you do talk to them about it you are likely going to find yourself in a situation where you don't have to convince them that they might be, but rather talking about whether or not they should get a professional diagnosis. This may or may not be helpful for your friend and is their personal decision.

So, by all means, have the conversation, but don't tell anyone directly that they are definitely autistic unless you are qualified to do so. Neither should you force anyone to get a professional diagnosis if they don't really need or want it.

You could perhaps just say:

I really want to thank you for the information about autism that you sent to me. It helped me understand myself. I think that getting a diagnosis might be beneficial to me because I have a need to understand myself better.

This might just encourage your friend who may suspect the same about their self to do the same thing.

Autism is understood today in a way that it never was in the past, which is why so many kids are getting a diagnosis, but also why so many adults that may be on the autism spectrum were never diagnosed.

You point out that there is a clear difference between thinking you are on the autism spectrum and actually getting a professional diagnosis, so presumably your goal is to encourage your friend to get a proper diganosis, not just think it of themselves. But you also say that this friend gave you the information and tools to discover this about yourself, so the likelihood is that your friend already suspects it of their self.

Some adults have found it beneficial to get a professional diagnosis later in life because it helps them understand themselves better, explain themselves to others, and even get some support if needed. Others, however, prefer not to seek a late diagnosis. Even if they suspect they might be on the spectrum, they may feel that they have learned how to deal with life, found their place in society, are happy with their friends, job etc, and do not require a label at this stage in their life.

If you do talk to them about it you are likely going to find yourself in a situation where you don't have to convince them that they might be, but rather talking about whether or not they should get a professional diagnosis. This may or may not be helpful for your friend and is their personal decision.

So, by all means, have the conversation, but don't tell anyone directly that they are definitely autistic unless you are qualified to do so. Neither should you force anyone to get a professional diagnosis if they don't really need or want it.

You could perhaps just say:

I really want to thank you for the information about autism that you sent to me. It helped me understand myself. I think that getting a diagnosis might be beneficial to me because I have a need to understand myself better.

This might just encourage your friend who may suspect the same about their self to do the same thing.

If you really want to force the subject, the most gentle way might be:

Have you ever thought that you might be on the autism spectrum yourself?

This is less direct than saying you think they are autistic, and less likely to cause offence if they do not believe they are.

Just one final point, and I hope you feel this is fair - you say yourself that it is usual for "people on the autism spectrum to not understand what a neurotypical person is saying because we (people on the autism spectrum) don't have the same way of thinking". So with this in mind, would it be fair to say that someone with autism could misinterpret the words or actions of a neurotypical person to be autism? You might actually be the least qualified person to say someone else is autistic or not.

2 edited following comments
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Autism is understood today in a way that it never was in the past, which is why so many kids are getting a diagnosis, but also why so many adults that may be on the autism spectrum were never diagnosed.

I should say at thisYou point out that there is a clear difference between thinking you are on the autism spectrum and actually getting a professional diagnosis, so presumably your goal is to encourage your friend to get a proper diganosis, not just think it of themselves. Even ifBut you thinkalso say that autism explains thingsthis friend gave you the information and tools to discover this about yourself that you have never previously understood, if you only self-diagnose thereso the likelihood is a possibility that you are wrong and you are just now looking at yourself from a distorted viewpointyour friend already suspects it of their self.

Some adults have found it beneficial to get a professional diagnosis later in life because it helps them understand themselves better, explain themselves to others, and even get some support if needed. Others, however, prefer not to seek a late diagnosis. Even if they suspect they might be on the spectrum, they may feel that they have learned how to deal with life, found their place in society, are happy with their friends, job etc, and do not require a label at this stage in their life.

You say that this friend has given you the information and tools to get a (self?) diagnosis, so the likely answer to your question of "how do you tell a Facebook friend that they might be on the autism spectrum" is that they probably already suspect it themselves.

If you do talk to them about it you are likely going to find yourself in a situation where you don't have to convince them that they might be, but rather talking about whether or not they (and you?) should get a professional diagnosis. This may or may not be helpful for your friend and is their personal decision.

So, by all means, have the conversation, but don't tell anyone directly that they are definitely autistic, and neither unless you are qualified to do so. Neither should you force anyone to get a professional diagnosis if they don't really need or want it.

You could perhaps just say:

I really want to thank you for the information about autism that you sent to me. It helped me understand myself. I think that getting a diagnosis might be beneficial to me because I have a need to understand myself better.

This might just encourage your friend who may suspect the same about their self to do the same thing.

Autism is understood today in a way that it never was in the past, which is why so many kids are getting a diagnosis, but also why so many adults that may be on the autism spectrum were never diagnosed.

I should say at this point that there is a difference between thinking you are on the autism spectrum and actually getting a professional diagnosis. Even if you think that autism explains things about yourself that you have never previously understood, if you only self-diagnose there is a possibility that you are wrong and you are just now looking at yourself from a distorted viewpoint.

Some adults have found it beneficial to get a professional diagnosis later in life because it helps them understand themselves better, explain themselves to others, and even get some support if needed. Others, however, prefer not to seek a late diagnosis. Even if they suspect they might be on the spectrum, they may feel that they have learned how to deal with life, found their place in society, are happy with their friends, job etc, and do not require a label at this stage in their life.

You say that this friend has given you the information and tools to get a (self?) diagnosis, so the likely answer to your question of "how do you tell a Facebook friend that they might be on the autism spectrum" is that they probably already suspect it themselves.

If you do talk to them about it you are likely going to find yourself in a situation where you don't have to convince them that they might be, but rather talking about whether or not they (and you?) should get a professional diagnosis. This may or may not be helpful for your friend.

So, by all means, have the conversation, but don't tell anyone that they are definitely autistic, and neither should you force anyone to get a professional diagnosis if they don't really need or want it.

You could perhaps just say:

I really want to thank you for the information about autism that you sent to me. It helped me understand myself. I think that getting a diagnosis might be beneficial to me because I have a need to understand myself better.

This might just encourage your friend who may suspect the same about their self to do the same thing.

Autism is understood today in a way that it never was in the past, which is why so many kids are getting a diagnosis, but also why so many adults that may be on the autism spectrum were never diagnosed.

You point out that there is a clear difference between thinking you are on the autism spectrum and actually getting a professional diagnosis, so presumably your goal is to encourage your friend to get a proper diganosis, not just think it of themselves. But you also say that this friend gave you the information and tools to discover this about yourself, so the likelihood is that your friend already suspects it of their self.

Some adults have found it beneficial to get a professional diagnosis later in life because it helps them understand themselves better, explain themselves to others, and even get some support if needed. Others, however, prefer not to seek a late diagnosis. Even if they suspect they might be on the spectrum, they may feel that they have learned how to deal with life, found their place in society, are happy with their friends, job etc, and do not require a label at this stage in their life.

If you do talk to them about it you are likely going to find yourself in a situation where you don't have to convince them that they might be, but rather talking about whether or not they should get a professional diagnosis. This may or may not be helpful for your friend and is their personal decision.

So, by all means, have the conversation, but don't tell anyone directly that they are definitely autistic unless you are qualified to do so. Neither should you force anyone to get a professional diagnosis if they don't really need or want it.

You could perhaps just say:

I really want to thank you for the information about autism that you sent to me. It helped me understand myself. I think that getting a diagnosis might be beneficial to me because I have a need to understand myself better.

This might just encourage your friend who may suspect the same about their self to do the same thing.

1
source | link

Autism is understood today in a way that it never was in the past, which is why so many kids are getting a diagnosis, but also why so many adults that may be on the autism spectrum were never diagnosed.

I should say at this point that there is a difference between thinking you are on the autism spectrum and actually getting a professional diagnosis. Even if you think that autism explains things about yourself that you have never previously understood, if you only self-diagnose there is a possibility that you are wrong and you are just now looking at yourself from a distorted viewpoint.

Some adults have found it beneficial to get a professional diagnosis later in life because it helps them understand themselves better, explain themselves to others, and even get some support if needed. Others, however, prefer not to seek a late diagnosis. Even if they suspect they might be on the spectrum, they may feel that they have learned how to deal with life, found their place in society, are happy with their friends, job etc, and do not require a label at this stage in their life.

You say that this friend has given you the information and tools to get a (self?) diagnosis, so the likely answer to your question of "how do you tell a Facebook friend that they might be on the autism spectrum" is that they probably already suspect it themselves.

If you do talk to them about it you are likely going to find yourself in a situation where you don't have to convince them that they might be, but rather talking about whether or not they (and you?) should get a professional diagnosis. This may or may not be helpful for your friend.

So, by all means, have the conversation, but don't tell anyone that they are definitely autistic, and neither should you force anyone to get a professional diagnosis if they don't really need or want it.

You could perhaps just say:

I really want to thank you for the information about autism that you sent to me. It helped me understand myself. I think that getting a diagnosis might be beneficial to me because I have a need to understand myself better.

This might just encourage your friend who may suspect the same about their self to do the same thing.