3 deleted 2 characters in body
source | link

Honestly it sounds like your current approach is pretty spot on. I'm not much of a dancer, so I ran your question by my partner who is:

Consider going "squaded up" with a few friends, if your partner can't come. They can potentially interdict that type of behavior, and you can tell others you're just there to have fun with your friends.

Your current approach is good for going solo, it's unfortunate many people don't understand consent. If solo is you'reyour only option and it continues to be an issue try to find other venues. I find smaller events tend to have more respect on the dancefloor compared to packed nightclubs.

To expand on that a bit, you can ask a friend to "interdict" if they spot someone getting too intimate. I've had a few friends that would ask me to step-in in these cases, and I gladly provided that service. Basically they'd ask, I'd spot someone getting too close and I'd gently move between them on the dance floor. In other cases my friend would step close throw an arm around me and hang until the offending party got the impression that we were there together.

Basically, there's safety in numbers. If you can go "squaded up", as the kids say, that's a great way to dance safe.

Honestly it sounds like your current approach is pretty spot on. I'm not much of a dancer, so I ran your question by my partner who is:

Consider going "squaded up" with a few friends, if your partner can't come. They can potentially interdict that type of behavior, and you can tell others you're just there to have fun with your friends.

Your current approach is good for going solo, it's unfortunate many people don't understand consent. If solo is you're only option and it continues to be an issue try to find other venues. I find smaller events tend to have more respect on the dancefloor compared to packed nightclubs.

To expand on that a bit, you can ask a friend to "interdict" if they spot someone getting too intimate. I've had a few friends that would ask me to step-in in these cases, and I gladly provided that service. Basically they'd ask, I'd spot someone getting too close and I'd gently move between them on the dance floor. In other cases my friend would step close throw an arm around me and hang until the offending party got the impression that we were there together.

Basically, there's safety in numbers. If you can go "squaded up", as the kids say, that's a great way to dance safe.

Honestly it sounds like your current approach is pretty spot on. I'm not much of a dancer, so I ran your question by my partner who is:

Consider going "squaded up" with a few friends, if your partner can't come. They can potentially interdict that type of behavior, and you can tell others you're just there to have fun with your friends.

Your current approach is good for going solo, it's unfortunate many people don't understand consent. If solo is your only option and it continues to be an issue try to find other venues. I find smaller events tend to have more respect on the dancefloor compared to packed nightclubs.

To expand on that a bit, you can ask a friend to "interdict" if they spot someone getting too intimate. I've had a few friends that would ask me to step-in in these cases, and I gladly provided that service. Basically they'd ask, I'd spot someone getting too close and I'd gently move between them on the dance floor. In other cases my friend would step close throw an arm around me and hang until the offending party got the impression that we were there together.

Basically, there's safety in numbers. If you can go "squaded up", as the kids say, that's a great way to dance safe.

2 Stupid autocorrect...
source | link

Honestly it sounds like your current approach is pretty spot on. I'm not much of a dancer, so I ran your question by my partner who is:

Consider going "squaded up" with a few friends, if your partner can't come. They can potentially interdict that type of behavior, and you can tell others you're just there to have fun with your friends.

Your current approach is good for going solo, it's unfortunate many people don't understand consent. If solo is you're only option and it continues to be an issue try to find other venues. I find smaller events tend to have more respect on the dancefloor compared to packed nightclubs.

To expand on that a bit, you can ask a friend to "interdict" if they spot someone getting too intimate. I've had a few friends that would ask me to step-in in these cases, and I gladly provided that service. Basically they'd ask, I'd spot someone getting too close and I'd gently move between them on the dance floor. In other cases my friend would step close throw an arm around me and hang until the offending party got the impression that we were there together.

Basically, there's safety in numbers. If you can go "squared"squaded up", as the kids say, that's a great way to dance safe.

Honestly it sounds like your current approach is pretty spot on. I'm not much of a dancer, so I ran your question by my partner is:

Consider going "squaded up" with a few friends, if your partner can't come. They can potentially interdict that type of behavior, and you can tell others you're just there to have fun with your friends.

Your current approach is good for going solo, it's unfortunate many people don't understand consent. If solo is you're only option and it continues to be an issue try to find other venues. I find smaller events tend to have more respect on the dancefloor compared to packed nightclubs.

To expand on that a bit, you can ask a friend to "interdict" if they spot someone getting too intimate. I've had a few friends that would ask me to step-in in these cases, and I gladly provided that service. Basically they'd ask, I'd spot someone getting too close and I'd gently move between them on the dance floor. In other cases my friend would step close throw an arm around me and hang until the offending party got the impression that we were there together.

Basically, there's safety in numbers. If you can go "squared up", as the kids say, that's a great way to dance safe.

Honestly it sounds like your current approach is pretty spot on. I'm not much of a dancer, so I ran your question by my partner who is:

Consider going "squaded up" with a few friends, if your partner can't come. They can potentially interdict that type of behavior, and you can tell others you're just there to have fun with your friends.

Your current approach is good for going solo, it's unfortunate many people don't understand consent. If solo is you're only option and it continues to be an issue try to find other venues. I find smaller events tend to have more respect on the dancefloor compared to packed nightclubs.

To expand on that a bit, you can ask a friend to "interdict" if they spot someone getting too intimate. I've had a few friends that would ask me to step-in in these cases, and I gladly provided that service. Basically they'd ask, I'd spot someone getting too close and I'd gently move between them on the dance floor. In other cases my friend would step close throw an arm around me and hang until the offending party got the impression that we were there together.

Basically, there's safety in numbers. If you can go "squaded up", as the kids say, that's a great way to dance safe.

1
source | link

Honestly it sounds like your current approach is pretty spot on. I'm not much of a dancer, so I ran your question by my partner is:

Consider going "squaded up" with a few friends, if your partner can't come. They can potentially interdict that type of behavior, and you can tell others you're just there to have fun with your friends.

Your current approach is good for going solo, it's unfortunate many people don't understand consent. If solo is you're only option and it continues to be an issue try to find other venues. I find smaller events tend to have more respect on the dancefloor compared to packed nightclubs.

To expand on that a bit, you can ask a friend to "interdict" if they spot someone getting too intimate. I've had a few friends that would ask me to step-in in these cases, and I gladly provided that service. Basically they'd ask, I'd spot someone getting too close and I'd gently move between them on the dance floor. In other cases my friend would step close throw an arm around me and hang until the offending party got the impression that we were there together.

Basically, there's safety in numbers. If you can go "squared up", as the kids say, that's a great way to dance safe.