4 Added more explainations
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OP here. I was hoping that someone with anorexia would write an answer, since this hasn't been the case so far, I decided to write an answer based on the external source of someone who had anorexia.

I'm writing this answer based on this external source. It's a blog post written by someone who had an eating disorder.


Here is a summary of what is said in this external source:

Don't comment on the person's body shape.

There really is no right or safe way to do it. Anything you say can and will be misinterpreted.

Especially, don't say:

But you’re already so skinny!

orIf the person wants to be skinny, then they will be happy about this and it will encourage them to become even more skinny.

On the other hand, if the person is trying to recover from anorexia, they might associate "skinny" with "ill" and this might discourage them.

Also, don't say:

You don’t look like you have an eating disorder.

orPeople who are overweight (according to society standards) can still have an eating disorder. And if people around them don't believe that, then it could be very dangerous for their health, leading them to not be treated for a disorder they do have.

Don't say either:

I wish I looked like you

orPeople with an eating disorder suffer and are constantly fighting against their brain. Telling them "I wish I looked like you" without thinking about all the pain they go through is very insensitive.

You also shouldn't say:

You look so healthy!

More explanations here will come later, but you could still read the blog to know about it.


However, here are some of the things you can do:

Take the focus off of their body. Some of the most thoughtful, kindest, unforgettable compliments I have ever received had nothing to do with my body image.

Here are some compliments examples that the person writing the blog suggest you to use:

  • Compliment on "their refreshing personality"

  • "their witty sense of humor"

  • "their exceptional intelligence"

  • "the sparkle in their eyes"


Some other relevant links:

OP here. I was hoping that someone with anorexia would write an answer, since this hasn't been the case so far, I decided to write an answer based on the external source of someone who had anorexia.

I'm writing this answer based on this external source. It's a blog post written by someone who had an eating disorder.


Here is a summary of what is said in this external source:

Don't comment on the person's body shape.

There really is no right or safe way to do it. Anything you say can and will be misinterpreted.

Especially, don't say:

But you’re already so skinny!

or

You don’t look like you have an eating disorder.

or

I wish I looked like you

or

You look so healthy!


However, here are some of the things you can do:

Take the focus off of their body. Some of the most thoughtful, kindest, unforgettable compliments I have ever received had nothing to do with my body image.

Here are some compliments examples that the person writing the blog suggest you to use:

  • Compliment on "their refreshing personality"

  • "their witty sense of humor"

  • "their exceptional intelligence"

  • "the sparkle in their eyes"


Some other relevant links:

OP here. I was hoping that someone with anorexia would write an answer, since this hasn't been the case so far, I decided to write an answer based on the external source of someone who had anorexia.

I'm writing this answer based on this external source. It's a blog post written by someone who had an eating disorder.


Here is a summary of what is said in this external source:

Don't comment on the person's body shape.

There really is no right or safe way to do it. Anything you say can and will be misinterpreted.

Especially, don't say:

But you’re already so skinny!

If the person wants to be skinny, then they will be happy about this and it will encourage them to become even more skinny.

On the other hand, if the person is trying to recover from anorexia, they might associate "skinny" with "ill" and this might discourage them.

Also, don't say:

You don’t look like you have an eating disorder.

People who are overweight (according to society standards) can still have an eating disorder. And if people around them don't believe that, then it could be very dangerous for their health, leading them to not be treated for a disorder they do have.

Don't say either:

I wish I looked like you

People with an eating disorder suffer and are constantly fighting against their brain. Telling them "I wish I looked like you" without thinking about all the pain they go through is very insensitive.

You also shouldn't say:

You look so healthy!

More explanations here will come later, but you could still read the blog to know about it.


However, here are some of the things you can do:

Take the focus off of their body. Some of the most thoughtful, kindest, unforgettable compliments I have ever received had nothing to do with my body image.

Here are some compliments examples that the person writing the blog suggest you to use:

  • Compliment on "their refreshing personality"

  • "their witty sense of humor"

  • "their exceptional intelligence"

  • "the sparkle in their eyes"


Some other relevant links:

3 Adding a sum up of what is said in the links
source | link

OP here. I was hoping that someone with anorexia would write an answer, since this hasn't been the case so far, I decided to write an answer based on the external source of someone who had anorexia.

I'm writing this answer based on this external source. It's a blog post written by someone who had an eating disorder.


Here is a summary of what is said in this external source:

Don't comment on the person's body shape. Don't comment on the person's body shape.

There really is no right or safe way to do it. Anything you say can and will be misinterpreted.will be misinterpreted.

Especially, don't say:

But you’re already so skinny!

or

You don’t look like you have an eating disorder.

or

I wish I looked like you

or

You look so healthy!


However, here are some of the things you can do:

Take the focus off of their body. Some of the most thoughtful, kindest, unforgettable compliments I have ever received had nothing to do with my body image.

Here are some compliments examples that the person writing the blog suggest you to use:

  • Compliment on "their refreshing personality"

  • "their witty sense of humor"

  • "their exceptional intelligence"

  • "the sparkle in their eyes"


Some other relevant links:

OP here. I was hoping that someone with anorexia would write an answer, since this hasn't been the case so far, I decided to write an answer based on the external source of someone who had anorexia.

I'm writing this answer based on this external source. It's a blog post written by someone who had an eating disorder.


Here is a summary of what is said in this external source

Don't comment on the person's body shape.

There really is no right or safe way to do it. Anything you say can and will be misinterpreted.

Especially, don't say:

But you’re already so skinny!

or

You don’t look like you have an eating disorder.

or

I wish I looked like you

or

You look so healthy!


However, here are some of the things you can do:

Take the focus off of their body. Some of the most thoughtful, kindest, unforgettable compliments I have ever received had nothing to do with my body image.

Here are some compliments examples that the person writing the blog suggest you to use:

  • Compliment on "their refreshing personality"

  • "their witty sense of humor"

  • "their exceptional intelligence"

  • "the sparkle in their eyes"


Some other relevant links:

OP here. I was hoping that someone with anorexia would write an answer, since this hasn't been the case so far, I decided to write an answer based on the external source of someone who had anorexia.

I'm writing this answer based on this external source. It's a blog post written by someone who had an eating disorder.


Here is a summary of what is said in this external source:

Don't comment on the person's body shape.

There really is no right or safe way to do it. Anything you say can and will be misinterpreted.

Especially, don't say:

But you’re already so skinny!

or

You don’t look like you have an eating disorder.

or

I wish I looked like you

or

You look so healthy!


However, here are some of the things you can do:

Take the focus off of their body. Some of the most thoughtful, kindest, unforgettable compliments I have ever received had nothing to do with my body image.

Here are some compliments examples that the person writing the blog suggest you to use:

  • Compliment on "their refreshing personality"

  • "their witty sense of humor"

  • "their exceptional intelligence"

  • "the sparkle in their eyes"


Some other relevant links:

2 added 217 characters in body
source | link

OP here. I was hoping that someone with anorexia would write an answer, since this hasn't been the case so far, I decided to write an answer based on the external source of someone who had anorexia.

I'm writing this answer based on this external source. It's a blog post written by someone who had an eating disorder.


Here is a summary of what is said in this external source

Don't comment on the person's body shape.

There really is no right or safe way to do it. Anything you say can and will be misinterpreted.

Especially, don't say:

But you’re already so skinny!

or

You don’t look like you have an eating disorder.

or

I wish I looked like you

or

You look so healthy!


However, here are some of the things you can do:

Take the focus off of their body. Some of the most thoughtful, kindest, unforgettable compliments I have ever received had nothing to do with my body image.

Here are some compliments examples that the person writing the blog suggest you to use:

  • Compliment on "their refreshing personality"

  • "their witty sense of humor"

  • "their exceptional intelligence"

  • "the sparkle in their eyes"


Some other relevant links:

I'm writing this answer based on this external source. It's a blog post written by someone who had an eating disorder.


Here is a summary of what is said in this external source

Don't comment on the person's body shape.

There really is no right or safe way to do it. Anything you say can and will be misinterpreted.

Especially, don't say:

But you’re already so skinny!

or

You don’t look like you have an eating disorder.

or

I wish I looked like you

or

You look so healthy!


However, here are some of the things you can do:

Take the focus off of their body. Some of the most thoughtful, kindest, unforgettable compliments I have ever received had nothing to do with my body image.

Here are some compliments examples that the person writing the blog suggest you to use:

  • Compliment on "their refreshing personality"

  • "their witty sense of humor"

  • "their exceptional intelligence"

  • "the sparkle in their eyes"


Some other relevant links:

OP here. I was hoping that someone with anorexia would write an answer, since this hasn't been the case so far, I decided to write an answer based on the external source of someone who had anorexia.

I'm writing this answer based on this external source. It's a blog post written by someone who had an eating disorder.


Here is a summary of what is said in this external source

Don't comment on the person's body shape.

There really is no right or safe way to do it. Anything you say can and will be misinterpreted.

Especially, don't say:

But you’re already so skinny!

or

You don’t look like you have an eating disorder.

or

I wish I looked like you

or

You look so healthy!


However, here are some of the things you can do:

Take the focus off of their body. Some of the most thoughtful, kindest, unforgettable compliments I have ever received had nothing to do with my body image.

Here are some compliments examples that the person writing the blog suggest you to use:

  • Compliment on "their refreshing personality"

  • "their witty sense of humor"

  • "their exceptional intelligence"

  • "the sparkle in their eyes"


Some other relevant links:

1
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