2 Fix pluralization.
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"Guy""Guys" is often used as gender-neutral.

I decided to look at some data, and came to conclusions opposite that of my original answer. Here's some of what I found (in varying levels of rigor):

  • A survey by Mic:

    1,528 18- to 44-year-olds revealed that while 71.8% of people "often" used "guys" to refer to mixed-gender groups, 88.1% "rarely" or "never" referred to mixed groups by female generics such as "gals," "girls" or "ladies."

    The blog post recommends not using "guys", by the way; it seems that "guys" is still used more often than female generic words.

  • A solely online survey:

    The main thing I find interesting here is how women and men perceive these words differently: about 50% of men (+ other) think that “Java guys” is gender neutral, while only 25% of women do. There’s a similar split for “Python guy” and “Erlang guy”.

    The big outlier here? The case where "guys" is being used to address a group of people (of the same or mixed gender). In this case, both women and men perceive it as being gender-neutral.

  • A senior thesis by Kerry Bodine, supervised by Douglas Hofstadter:

    Overall, Experiment One suggests that "guys" does not evoke more imagery of one gender or the other. Furthermore, the finding from the only story that produced significant results indicates that the expectations to find more masculine imagery associated with "guys" are unfounded.

These are just a few results. The point is that many people of all genders perceive "guys" in this sort of usage as gender-neutral, both in real life and online settings.

"Guy" is often used as gender-neutral.

I decided to look at some data, and came to conclusions opposite that of my original answer. Here's some of what I found (in varying levels of rigor):

  • A survey by Mic:

    1,528 18- to 44-year-olds revealed that while 71.8% of people "often" used "guys" to refer to mixed-gender groups, 88.1% "rarely" or "never" referred to mixed groups by female generics such as "gals," "girls" or "ladies."

    The blog post recommends not using "guys", by the way; it seems that "guys" is still used more often than female generic words.

  • A solely online survey:

    The main thing I find interesting here is how women and men perceive these words differently: about 50% of men (+ other) think that “Java guys” is gender neutral, while only 25% of women do. There’s a similar split for “Python guy” and “Erlang guy”.

    The big outlier here? The case where "guys" is being used to address a group of people (of the same or mixed gender). In this case, both women and men perceive it as being gender-neutral.

  • A senior thesis by Kerry Bodine, supervised by Douglas Hofstadter:

    Overall, Experiment One suggests that "guys" does not evoke more imagery of one gender or the other. Furthermore, the finding from the only story that produced significant results indicates that the expectations to find more masculine imagery associated with "guys" are unfounded.

These are just a few results. The point is that many people of all genders perceive "guys" in this sort of usage as gender-neutral, both in real life and online settings.

"Guys" is often used as gender-neutral.

I decided to look at some data, and came to conclusions opposite that of my original answer. Here's some of what I found (in varying levels of rigor):

  • A survey by Mic:

    1,528 18- to 44-year-olds revealed that while 71.8% of people "often" used "guys" to refer to mixed-gender groups, 88.1% "rarely" or "never" referred to mixed groups by female generics such as "gals," "girls" or "ladies."

    The blog post recommends not using "guys", by the way; it seems that "guys" is still used more often than female generic words.

  • A solely online survey:

    The main thing I find interesting here is how women and men perceive these words differently: about 50% of men (+ other) think that “Java guys” is gender neutral, while only 25% of women do. There’s a similar split for “Python guy” and “Erlang guy”.

    The big outlier here? The case where "guys" is being used to address a group of people (of the same or mixed gender). In this case, both women and men perceive it as being gender-neutral.

  • A senior thesis by Kerry Bodine, supervised by Douglas Hofstadter:

    Overall, Experiment One suggests that "guys" does not evoke more imagery of one gender or the other. Furthermore, the finding from the only story that produced significant results indicates that the expectations to find more masculine imagery associated with "guys" are unfounded.

These are just a few results. The point is that many people of all genders perceive "guys" in this sort of usage as gender-neutral, both in real life and online settings.

1
source | link

"Guy" is often used as gender-neutral.

I decided to look at some data, and came to conclusions opposite that of my original answer. Here's some of what I found (in varying levels of rigor):

  • A survey by Mic:

    1,528 18- to 44-year-olds revealed that while 71.8% of people "often" used "guys" to refer to mixed-gender groups, 88.1% "rarely" or "never" referred to mixed groups by female generics such as "gals," "girls" or "ladies."

    The blog post recommends not using "guys", by the way; it seems that "guys" is still used more often than female generic words.

  • A solely online survey:

    The main thing I find interesting here is how women and men perceive these words differently: about 50% of men (+ other) think that “Java guys” is gender neutral, while only 25% of women do. There’s a similar split for “Python guy” and “Erlang guy”.

    The big outlier here? The case where "guys" is being used to address a group of people (of the same or mixed gender). In this case, both women and men perceive it as being gender-neutral.

  • A senior thesis by Kerry Bodine, supervised by Douglas Hofstadter:

    Overall, Experiment One suggests that "guys" does not evoke more imagery of one gender or the other. Furthermore, the finding from the only story that produced significant results indicates that the expectations to find more masculine imagery associated with "guys" are unfounded.

These are just a few results. The point is that many people of all genders perceive "guys" in this sort of usage as gender-neutral, both in real life and online settings.