3 grammar
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You need to be able to talk about this sort of thing with the neighbours. To that end, you need to meet the neighbours. That means the neighbours on both sides (if you have them).

A good way to introduce yourself is to invite them over for tea and cake. (Or coffee and cake, seeing as you're in the US not the UK). I'd suggest ring their doorbell and say:

"Hi, I'm Seth and I've recently moved in next door. I'd like to meet the neighbours, so I'm doing tea and cake tomorrow about 4pm if you're free?".

You will need to judge whether to bring up the fence issue when they're over having tea and cake, or whether to do it another time (which could be over tea and cake again, or when you bump into them on the driveway). I'd suggest wording along the lines of

"Oh, {neighbour's name}, I was hoping to talk about the fence. I'm not sure who'swhose responsibility its upkeep is, but I was thinking about replacing it, if that's ok with you?"

There are a few key points in this:

  • Denying knowledge of who's responsible for the fence. This means you're not immediately putting them on the backfoot by saying "the fence is your responsibility" and implying that they've not done what they should have
  • Saying you were thinking of replacing it, and therefore not suggesting you're expecting any financial contribution from them. This works seeing as you said you were happy to pay for all of it. And again it attempts not to put them on the backfoot, by making it clear you're not asking them for money.

You need to be able to talk about this sort of thing with the neighbours. To that end, you need to meet the neighbours. That means the neighbours on both sides (if you have them).

A good way to introduce yourself is to invite them over for tea and cake. (Or coffee and cake, seeing as you're in the US not the UK). I'd suggest ring their doorbell and say:

"Hi, I'm Seth and I've recently moved in next door. I'd like to meet the neighbours, so I'm doing tea and cake tomorrow about 4pm if you're free?".

You will need to judge whether to bring up the fence issue when they're over having tea and cake, or whether to do it another time (which could be over tea and cake again, or when you bump into them on the driveway). I'd suggest wording along the lines of

"Oh, {neighbour's name}, I was hoping to talk about the fence. I'm not sure who's responsibility its upkeep is, but I was thinking about replacing it, if that's ok with you?"

There are a few key points in this:

  • Denying knowledge of who's responsible for the fence. This means you're not immediately putting them on the backfoot by saying "the fence is your responsibility" and implying that they've not done what they should have
  • Saying you were thinking of replacing it, and therefore not suggesting you're expecting any financial contribution from them. This works seeing as you said you were happy to pay for all of it. And again it attempts not to put them on the backfoot, by making it clear you're not asking them for money.

You need to be able to talk about this sort of thing with the neighbours. To that end, you need to meet the neighbours. That means the neighbours on both sides (if you have them).

A good way to introduce yourself is to invite them over for tea and cake. (Or coffee and cake, seeing as you're in the US not the UK). I'd suggest ring their doorbell and say:

"Hi, I'm Seth and I've recently moved in next door. I'd like to meet the neighbours, so I'm doing tea and cake tomorrow about 4pm if you're free?".

You will need to judge whether to bring up the fence issue when they're over having tea and cake, or whether to do it another time (which could be over tea and cake again, or when you bump into them on the driveway). I'd suggest wording along the lines of

"Oh, {neighbour's name}, I was hoping to talk about the fence. I'm not sure whose responsibility its upkeep is, but I was thinking about replacing it, if that's ok with you?"

There are a few key points in this:

  • Denying knowledge of who's responsible for the fence. This means you're not immediately putting them on the backfoot by saying "the fence is your responsibility" and implying that they've not done what they should have
  • Saying you were thinking of replacing it, and therefore not suggesting you're expecting any financial contribution from them. This works seeing as you said you were happy to pay for all of it. And again it attempts not to put them on the backfoot, by making it clear you're not asking them for money.
2 removed possibly annoying timing of bringing up the issue
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You need to be able to talk about this sort of thing with the neighbours. To that end, you need to meet the neighbours. That means the neighbours on both sides (if you have them).

A good way to introduce yourself is to invite them over for tea and cake. (Or coffee and cake, seeing as you're in the US not the UK). I'd suggest ring their doorbell and say:

"Hi, I'm Seth and I've recently moved in next door. I'd like to meet the neighbours, so I'm doing tea and cake tomorrow about 4pm if you're free?".

WhenYou will need to judge whether to bring up the fence issue when they're over having tea and cake, or whether to do it another time (which could be over tea and cake again, or when you can then insert:bump into them on the driveway). I'd suggest wording along the lines of

"Oh, while I've got you here{neighbour's name}, I was hoping to talk about the fence. I'm not sure who's responsibility its upkeep is, but I was thinking about replacing it, if that's ok with you?"

There are a few key points in this:

  • Denying knowledge of who's responsible for the fence. This means you're not immediately putting them on the backfoot by saying "the fence is your responsibility" and implying that they've not done what they should have
  • Saying you were thinking of replacing it, and therefore not suggesting you're expecting any financial contribution from them. This works seeing as you said you were happy to pay for all of it. And again it attempts not to put them on the backfoot, by making it clear you're not asking them for money.

You need to be able to talk about this sort of thing with the neighbours. To that end, you need to meet the neighbours. That means the neighbours on both sides (if you have them).

A good way to introduce yourself is to invite them over for tea and cake. (Or coffee and cake, seeing as you're in the US not the UK). I'd suggest ring their doorbell and say:

"Hi, I'm Seth and I've recently moved in next door. I'd like to meet the neighbours, so I'm doing tea and cake tomorrow about 4pm if you're free?".

When they're over having tea and cake, you can then insert:

"Oh, while I've got you here, I was hoping to talk about the fence. I'm not sure who's responsibility its upkeep is, but I was thinking about replacing it, if that's ok with you?"

There are a few key points in this:

  • Denying knowledge of who's responsible for the fence. This means you're not immediately putting them on the backfoot by saying "the fence is your responsibility" and implying that they've not done what they should have
  • Saying you were thinking of replacing it, and therefore not suggesting you're expecting any financial contribution from them. This works seeing as you said you were happy to pay for all of it. And again it attempts not to put them on the backfoot, by making it clear you're not asking them for money.

You need to be able to talk about this sort of thing with the neighbours. To that end, you need to meet the neighbours. That means the neighbours on both sides (if you have them).

A good way to introduce yourself is to invite them over for tea and cake. (Or coffee and cake, seeing as you're in the US not the UK). I'd suggest ring their doorbell and say:

"Hi, I'm Seth and I've recently moved in next door. I'd like to meet the neighbours, so I'm doing tea and cake tomorrow about 4pm if you're free?".

You will need to judge whether to bring up the fence issue when they're over having tea and cake, or whether to do it another time (which could be over tea and cake again, or when you bump into them on the driveway). I'd suggest wording along the lines of

"Oh, {neighbour's name}, I was hoping to talk about the fence. I'm not sure who's responsibility its upkeep is, but I was thinking about replacing it, if that's ok with you?"

There are a few key points in this:

  • Denying knowledge of who's responsible for the fence. This means you're not immediately putting them on the backfoot by saying "the fence is your responsibility" and implying that they've not done what they should have
  • Saying you were thinking of replacing it, and therefore not suggesting you're expecting any financial contribution from them. This works seeing as you said you were happy to pay for all of it. And again it attempts not to put them on the backfoot, by making it clear you're not asking them for money.
1
source | link

You need to be able to talk about this sort of thing with the neighbours. To that end, you need to meet the neighbours. That means the neighbours on both sides (if you have them).

A good way to introduce yourself is to invite them over for tea and cake. (Or coffee and cake, seeing as you're in the US not the UK). I'd suggest ring their doorbell and say:

"Hi, I'm Seth and I've recently moved in next door. I'd like to meet the neighbours, so I'm doing tea and cake tomorrow about 4pm if you're free?".

When they're over having tea and cake, you can then insert:

"Oh, while I've got you here, I was hoping to talk about the fence. I'm not sure who's responsibility its upkeep is, but I was thinking about replacing it, if that's ok with you?"

There are a few key points in this:

  • Denying knowledge of who's responsible for the fence. This means you're not immediately putting them on the backfoot by saying "the fence is your responsibility" and implying that they've not done what they should have
  • Saying you were thinking of replacing it, and therefore not suggesting you're expecting any financial contribution from them. This works seeing as you said you were happy to pay for all of it. And again it attempts not to put them on the backfoot, by making it clear you're not asking them for money.