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A lot would depend on whether the CEO is a friendly type and open to informal conversation with a junior staff member during lunch.

In my personal experience in Indian culture, this is an uncomfortable situation: very senior officers are often remote and preoccupied and they might well ask us a question but they may not appreciate being asked a question in return.

The risk with being bold and asking this senior officer something, whether professional or personal, in the Indian context (though I am not specifically familiar with the IT sector) is that they might later remember us as being 'forward' or 'lacking sufficient respect' -- but this is probably not a problem in the USA!

You can also possibly commit a blunder by asking something that irritates the person, unless you are very familiar with their likes and dislikes. This actually happened:

Hospital Director to his PA: Do you know, that English Student person is impertinent. We met in the lunch room and he actually asked me whether I like music! I hate music, it's such a waste of time. You keep an eye on him. I didn't like his forward attitude and familiar way of asking me these questions...

Of course I have also been lucky to have extremely kind and friendly superior officers.

So I should advise you to keep it polite and formal unless the CEO is exceptionally friendly and he explicitly encourages you to have an informal conversation.

A lot would depend on whether the CEO is a friendly type and open to informal conversation with a junior staff member during lunch.

In my personal experience in Indian culture, this is an uncomfortable situation: very senior officers are often remote and preoccupied and they might well ask us a question but they may not appreciate being asked a question in return.

The risk with being bold and asking this senior officer something, whether professional or personal, in the Indian context (though I am not specifically familiar with the IT sector) is that they might later remember us as being 'forward' or 'lacking sufficient respect' -- but this is probably not a problem in the USA!

So I should advise you to keep it polite and formal unless the CEO is exceptionally friendly and he explicitly encourages you to have an informal conversation.

A lot would depend on whether the CEO is a friendly type and open to informal conversation with a junior staff member during lunch.

In my personal experience in Indian culture, this is an uncomfortable situation: very senior officers are often remote and preoccupied and they might well ask us a question but they may not appreciate being asked a question in return.

The risk with being bold and asking this senior officer something, whether professional or personal, in the Indian context (though I am not specifically familiar with the IT sector) is that they might later remember us as being 'forward' or 'lacking sufficient respect' -- but this is probably not a problem in the USA!

You can also possibly commit a blunder by asking something that irritates the person, unless you are very familiar with their likes and dislikes. This actually happened:

Hospital Director to his PA: Do you know, that English Student person is impertinent. We met in the lunch room and he actually asked me whether I like music! I hate music, it's such a waste of time. You keep an eye on him. I didn't like his forward attitude and familiar way of asking me these questions...

Of course I have also been lucky to have extremely kind and friendly superior officers.

So I should advise you to keep it polite and formal unless the CEO is exceptionally friendly and he explicitly encourages you to have an informal conversation.

2 added 311 characters in body
source | link

A lot would depend on whether the CEO is a friendly type and open to informal conversation with a junior staff member during lunch.

In my personal experience in Indian culture, this is an uncomfortable situation: very senior officers are often remote and preoccupied and they might well ask us a question but they may not appreciate being asked a question in return.

The risk with being bold and asking this senior officer something, whether professional or personal, in the Indian context (though I am not specifically familiar with the IT sector) is that they might later remember us as being 'forward' or 'lacking sufficient respect' -- but this is probably not a problem in the USA!

So I should advise you to keep it polite and formal unless the CEO is exceptionally friendly and he explicitly encourages you to have an informal conversation.

A lot would depend on whether the CEO is a friendly type and open to informal conversation with a junior staff member during lunch.

In my personal experience in Indian culture, very senior officers are often remote and preoccupied and they might well ask us a question but they may not appreciate being asked a question in return.

So I should advise you to keep it polite and formal unless the CEO is exceptionally friendly and he explicitly encourages you to have an informal conversation.

A lot would depend on whether the CEO is a friendly type and open to informal conversation with a junior staff member during lunch.

In my personal experience in Indian culture, this is an uncomfortable situation: very senior officers are often remote and preoccupied and they might well ask us a question but they may not appreciate being asked a question in return.

The risk with being bold and asking this senior officer something, whether professional or personal, in the Indian context (though I am not specifically familiar with the IT sector) is that they might later remember us as being 'forward' or 'lacking sufficient respect' -- but this is probably not a problem in the USA!

So I should advise you to keep it polite and formal unless the CEO is exceptionally friendly and he explicitly encourages you to have an informal conversation.

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source | link

A lot would depend on whether the CEO is a friendly type and open to informal conversation with a junior staff member during lunch.

In my personal experience in Indian culture, very senior officers are often remote and preoccupied and they might well ask us a question but they may not appreciate being asked a question in return.

So I should advise you to keep it polite and formal unless the CEO is exceptionally friendly and he explicitly encourages you to have an informal conversation.