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Etiquette demands the kindest and least disruptive action be undertaken.

You see a bunch of people sorting themselves out for a group photo. Before they have settled into position, and before the designated photographer is aiming their digicam or mobile at them, sprint lightly across the void space that has been created. You'll probably find other pedestrians, who are in a rush, doing likewise.

Once the photographer is standing still and is going to take their photo, wait, patiently, until the snaps have been taken. If a person disregards this moment and strolls between the photographer and the group (I have seen this happen) then they are the rude and obnoxious third party in this scenario. The photographer will have to wait until the trepasser has crossed the "passageway", the group will probably have to recompose itself, and the crowd will have to wait longer before they too can go about their business.

enter image description herepicture of a large group of people posing in the street

Besides, as can be seen in the photo above, there should always be enough space to walk behind the photographer, but the OP might even find it quicker to just wait and cross than to walk around a very busy square.

Etiquette demands the kindest and least disruptive action be undertaken.

You see a bunch of people sorting themselves out for a group photo. Before they have settled into position, and before the designated photographer is aiming their digicam or mobile at them, sprint lightly across the void space that has been created. You'll probably find other pedestrians, who are in a rush, doing likewise.

Once the photographer is standing still and is going to take their photo, wait, patiently, until the snaps have been taken. If a person disregards this moment and strolls between the photographer and the group (I have seen this happen) then they are the rude and obnoxious third party in this scenario. The photographer will have to wait until the trepasser has crossed the "passageway", the group will probably have to recompose itself, and the crowd will have to wait longer before they too can go about their business.

enter image description here

Besides, as can be seen in the photo above, there should always be enough space to walk behind the photographer, but the OP might even find it quicker to just wait and cross than to walk around a very busy square.

Etiquette demands the kindest and least disruptive action be undertaken.

You see a bunch of people sorting themselves out for a group photo. Before they have settled into position, and before the designated photographer is aiming their digicam or mobile at them, sprint lightly across the void space that has been created. You'll probably find other pedestrians, who are in a rush, doing likewise.

Once the photographer is standing still and is going to take their photo, wait, patiently, until the snaps have been taken. If a person disregards this moment and strolls between the photographer and the group (I have seen this happen) then they are the rude and obnoxious third party in this scenario. The photographer will have to wait until the trepasser has crossed the "passageway", the group will probably have to recompose itself, and the crowd will have to wait longer before they too can go about their business.

picture of a large group of people posing in the street

Besides, as can be seen in the photo above, there should always be enough space to walk behind the photographer, but the OP might even find it quicker to just wait and cross than to walk around a very busy square.

2 added 212 characters in body
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Etiquette demands the least invasive and the kindest and least disruptive action be undertaken.

You see a bunch of people sorting themselves out for a group photo. Before they have settled into position, and before the designated photographer is aiming their digicam or mobile at them, sprint lightly across the void space that has been created. You'll probably find other pedestrians, who are in a rush, doing likewise.

Once the photographer is standing still and is going to take their photo, wait, patiently, until the snaps have been taken. If a person disregards this moment and strolls between the photographer and the group (I have seen this happen) then they are the rude and obnoxious third party in this scenario. The photographer will have to wait until the trepasser has crossed the "passageway", the group will probably have to recompose itself, and the crowd will have to wait longer before they too can go about their business.

enter image description here

Besides, as can be seen in the photo above, there should always be enough space to walk behind the photographer, but the OP might even find it quicker to just wait and cross than to walk around a very busy square.

Etiquette demands the least invasive and the kindest action be undertaken.

You see a bunch of people sorting themselves out for a group photo. Before they have settled into position, and before the designated photographer is aiming their digicam or mobile at them, sprint lightly across the void space that has been created. You'll probably find other pedestrians, who are in a rush, doing likewise.

Once the photographer is standing still and is going to take their photo, wait, patiently, until the snaps have been taken. If a person disregards this moment and strolls between the photographer and the group (I have seen this happen) then they are the rude and obnoxious third party in this scenario. The photographer will have to wait until the trepasser has crossed the "passageway", the group will probably have to recompose itself, and the crowd will have to wait longer before they too can go about their business.

enter image description here

Etiquette demands the kindest and least disruptive action be undertaken.

You see a bunch of people sorting themselves out for a group photo. Before they have settled into position, and before the designated photographer is aiming their digicam or mobile at them, sprint lightly across the void space that has been created. You'll probably find other pedestrians, who are in a rush, doing likewise.

Once the photographer is standing still and is going to take their photo, wait, patiently, until the snaps have been taken. If a person disregards this moment and strolls between the photographer and the group (I have seen this happen) then they are the rude and obnoxious third party in this scenario. The photographer will have to wait until the trepasser has crossed the "passageway", the group will probably have to recompose itself, and the crowd will have to wait longer before they too can go about their business.

enter image description here

Besides, as can be seen in the photo above, there should always be enough space to walk behind the photographer, but the OP might even find it quicker to just wait and cross than to walk around a very busy square.

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Etiquette demands the least invasive and the kindest action be undertaken.

You see a bunch of people sorting themselves out for a group photo. Before they have settled into position, and before the designated photographer is aiming their digicam or mobile at them, sprint lightly across the void space that has been created. You'll probably find other pedestrians, who are in a rush, doing likewise.

Once the photographer is standing still and is going to take their photo, wait, patiently, until the snaps have been taken. If a person disregards this moment and strolls between the photographer and the group (I have seen this happen) then they are the rude and obnoxious third party in this scenario. The photographer will have to wait until the trepasser has crossed the "passageway", the group will probably have to recompose itself, and the crowd will have to wait longer before they too can go about their business.

enter image description here