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How can I tactfully approach this person and ask them to step down?

Simple: don't. Why?

In order to address the issue, said department has chosen a representative.

So, don't try anything to jump over her head, and stand in the front line.

Offer your help and show your skills and capabilities to ensure the group (department) an efficient clearing over the obstacle and reduce the risks of being overwhelmed by their strategy.

If the persons within this department think you can be of any help, they'll go back to you.

I would recommend that you list all the things that may be argued, bullet-list each point, and how you can help with each and every one of them. Then, give the list to the group, and ask them if they think it's a good idea, if it can be helpful, if they want you to step in. But taking over her responsibilities is not only rude, but will mostly be seen as arrogance.

Not to say going, alone, to the management and offer to take over...

It's a department (read: all people together) battle, not an individual fight.


At many workplaces, as I've seen many individuals who tried to take over others' responsibilities in their back, I can tell you it never went the right way...

Last but not least: how would you feel if someone was doing this to you?

How can I tactfully approach this person and ask them to step down?

Simple: don't. Why?

In order to address the issue, said department has chosen a representative.

So, don't try anything to jump over her head, and stand in the front line.

Offer your help and show your skills and capabilities to ensure the group (department) an efficient clearing over the obstacle and reduce the risks of being overwhelmed by their strategy.

If the persons within this department think you can be of any help, they'll go back to you.

I would recommend that you list all the things that may be argued, bullet-list each point, and how you can help with each and every one of them. Then, give the list to the group, and ask them if they think it's a good idea, if it can be helpful, if they want you to step in. But taking over her responsibilities is not only rude, but will mostly be seen as arrogance.

Not to say going, alone, to the management and offer to take over...

It's a department (read: all people together) battle, not an individual fight.


At many workplaces, as I've seen many individuals who tried to take over others' responsibilities in their back, I can tell you it never went the right way...

How can I tactfully approach this person and ask them to step down?

Simple: don't. Why?

In order to address the issue, said department has chosen a representative.

So, don't try anything to jump over her head, and stand in the front line.

Offer your help and show your skills and capabilities to ensure the group (department) an efficient clearing over the obstacle and reduce the risks of being overwhelmed by their strategy.

If the persons within this department think you can be of any help, they'll go back to you.

I would recommend that you list all the things that may be argued, bullet-list each point, and how you can help with each and every one of them. Then, give the list to the group, and ask them if they think it's a good idea, if it can be helpful, if they want you to step in. But taking over her responsibilities is not only rude, but will mostly be seen as arrogance.

Not to say going, alone, to the management and offer to take over...

It's a department (read: all people together) battle, not an individual fight.


At many workplaces, as I've seen many individuals who tried to take over others' responsibilities in their back, I can tell you it never went the right way...

Last but not least: how would you feel if someone was doing this to you?

2 added 1 character in body
source | link

How can I tactfully approach this person and ask them to step down?

Simple: don't. Why?

In order to address the issue, said department has chosen a representative.

So, don't try anything to jump over her head, and stand in the front line.

Offer your help and show your skills and capabilities to ensure the group (department) an efficient clearing over the obstacle and reduce the risks of being overwhelmed by their strategy.

If the persons within this department think you can be of any help, they'll go back to you.

I would recommend that you list all the things that may be argued, bullet-list each point, and how you can help with each and every one of them. Then, give the list to the group, and ask them if they think it's a good idea, if it can be helpful, if they want you to step in. But taking over her responsibilities is not only rude, but will mostly be seen as arrogance.

Not to say going, alone, to the management and offer to take over...

It's a department (read: all people together) battle, not an individual fight.


At many workplaces, as I've seen many individuals who tried to take over others responsabilitiesothers' responsibilities in their back, I can tell you it never went the right way...

How can I tactfully approach this person and ask them to step down?

Simple: don't. Why?

In order to address the issue, said department has chosen a representative.

So, don't try anything to jump over her head, and stand in the front line.

Offer your help and show your skills and capabilities to ensure the group (department) an efficient clearing over the obstacle and reduce the risks of being overwhelmed by their strategy.

If the persons within this department think you can be of any help, they'll go back to you.

I would recommend that you list all the things that may be argued, bullet-list each point, and how you can help with each and every one of them. Then, give the list to the group, and ask them if they think it's a good idea, if it can be helpful, if they want you to step in. But taking over her responsibilities is not only rude, but will mostly be seen as arrogance.

Not to say going, alone, to the management and offer to take over...

It's a department (read: all people together) battle, not an individual fight.


At many workplaces, as I've seen many individuals who tried to take over others responsabilities in their back, I can tell you it never went the right way...

How can I tactfully approach this person and ask them to step down?

Simple: don't. Why?

In order to address the issue, said department has chosen a representative.

So, don't try anything to jump over her head, and stand in the front line.

Offer your help and show your skills and capabilities to ensure the group (department) an efficient clearing over the obstacle and reduce the risks of being overwhelmed by their strategy.

If the persons within this department think you can be of any help, they'll go back to you.

I would recommend that you list all the things that may be argued, bullet-list each point, and how you can help with each and every one of them. Then, give the list to the group, and ask them if they think it's a good idea, if it can be helpful, if they want you to step in. But taking over her responsibilities is not only rude, but will mostly be seen as arrogance.

Not to say going, alone, to the management and offer to take over...

It's a department (read: all people together) battle, not an individual fight.


At many workplaces, as I've seen many individuals who tried to take over others' responsibilities in their back, I can tell you it never went the right way...

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source | link

How can I tactfully approach this person and ask them to step down?

Simple: don't. Why?

In order to address the issue, said department has chosen a representative.

So, don't try anything to jump over her head, and stand in the front line.

Offer your help and show your skills and capabilities to ensure the group (department) an efficient clearing over the obstacle and reduce the risks of being overwhelmed by their strategy.

If the persons within this department think you can be of any help, they'll go back to you.

I would recommend that you list all the things that may be argued, bullet-list each point, and how you can help with each and every one of them. Then, give the list to the group, and ask them if they think it's a good idea, if it can be helpful, if they want you to step in. But taking over her responsibilities is not only rude, but will mostly be seen as arrogance.

Not to say going, alone, to the management and offer to take over...

It's a department (read: all people together) battle, not an individual fight.


At many workplaces, as I've seen many individuals who tried to take over others responsabilities in their back, I can tell you it never went the right way...