2 Incorporated NotThatGuy's suggestion
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You could try to postpone it for the future and remain vague at that moment. One advantage is that you can later postpone it again, if they (I'll call them "Bob") comes up with it again.

Something like:

Bob: Michael Bay is truly the only real artist among the contemporary directors. Am I right?

 

Two possible answers (thanks to NotTatGuy for the suggestion), statement at the beginning may be omitted:

Stronger:

You: That's(That's certainly possible.) I have to think about it some more.

Weaker:

You: (I suppose that's a possibility.) I have to think about it some more.

Which one to use may depend on whom you are talking to and how you read the situation. The stronger statement may make it appear as if you weren't neutral (or might lean towards their view), but may be more effective in satisfying someone more argumentative.

The drawback is that he may still press on (but you can deflect Bob) or that he doesn't forget about it. You may not be able to evade his questions forever.

Instead of keeping silent, or mumbling, you could also try to

smile friendly

and appear interested. This may not always work, but oftentimes, especially very opinionated people, assume that others think like them. And then they may interpret your (non-) reaction as agreement, when you actually didn't (and so could later deny that).

You could try to postpone it for the future and remain vague at that moment. One advantage is that you can later postpone it again, if they (I'll call them "Bob") comes up with it again.

Something like:

Bob: Michael Bay is truly the only real artist among the contemporary directors. Am I right?

 

You: That's certainly possible. I have to think about it some more.

The drawback is that he may still press on (but you can deflect Bob) or that he doesn't forget about it. You may not be able to evade his questions forever.

Instead of keeping silent, or mumbling, you could also try to

smile friendly

and appear interested. This may not always work, but oftentimes, especially very opinionated people, assume that others think like them. And then they may interpret your (non-) reaction as agreement, when you actually didn't (and so could later deny that).

You could try to postpone it for the future and remain vague at that moment. One advantage is that you can later postpone it again, if they (I'll call them "Bob") comes up with it again.

Something like:

Bob: Michael Bay is truly the only real artist among the contemporary directors. Am I right?

Two possible answers (thanks to NotTatGuy for the suggestion), statement at the beginning may be omitted:

Stronger:

You: (That's certainly possible.) I have to think about it some more.

Weaker:

You: (I suppose that's a possibility.) I have to think about it some more.

Which one to use may depend on whom you are talking to and how you read the situation. The stronger statement may make it appear as if you weren't neutral (or might lean towards their view), but may be more effective in satisfying someone more argumentative.

The drawback is that he may still press on (but you can deflect Bob) or that he doesn't forget about it. You may not be able to evade his questions forever.

Instead of keeping silent, or mumbling, you could also try to

smile friendly

and appear interested. This may not always work, but oftentimes, especially very opinionated people, assume that others think like them. And then they may interpret your (non-) reaction as agreement, when you actually didn't (and so could later deny that).

1
source | link

You could try to postpone it for the future and remain vague at that moment. One advantage is that you can later postpone it again, if they (I'll call them "Bob") comes up with it again.

Something like:

Bob: Michael Bay is truly the only real artist among the contemporary directors. Am I right?

You: That's certainly possible. I have to think about it some more.

The drawback is that he may still press on (but you can deflect Bob) or that he doesn't forget about it. You may not be able to evade his questions forever.

Instead of keeping silent, or mumbling, you could also try to

smile friendly

and appear interested. This may not always work, but oftentimes, especially very opinionated people, assume that others think like them. And then they may interpret your (non-) reaction as agreement, when you actually didn't (and so could later deny that).