Question Protected by Community
2 added 172 characters in body
source | link

I recently got married a few months ago and received a nice gift from an aunt and uncle. We sent them a thank you card. Unfortunately, we had the address wrong, and the card was returned to us in a mailbox my wife and I seldom check.

We would like to send them a new thank you card and apologize for the delay, however we're afraid of coming it comingthat sticking the apology in the card may come across rudely, or leave them feeling unappreciated. In addition, we're seeing them in person this Thanksgiving, so we aren't sure if that's a better time to address this. Here's the idea of a card we might write:

Dear (aunt and uncle).

Thank you for the beautiful widget. blah blah blah (stuff about widget). Also, we are so sorry you're just now getting this card! We wrote the address wrong the first time, and it was returned to a mailbox we don't check. Thank you again so much, and we can't wait to see you for Thanksgiving!

(standard closing)

Lord and Lady Farquaad

Is this a reasonable way to broach this? The other options we'vewording isn't the significant part here. Mainly, I'm wondering if addressing the apology in the card like this is the correct approach. My wife and I have also considered arethe following options:

  1. Omitting an apology in the card, and offering one when we see them in person.
  2. To omit the apology in the card and not send it. When we see them this week, explain what happened and give them the card in person to "make sure they got it this time," but this sort of defeats the purpose of a card...

What's our best course of action here to make sure my aunt and uncle don't feel spurned? The gift is pretty nice, so they certainly deserve to feel recognized.

I recently got married a few months ago and received a nice gift from an aunt and uncle. We sent them a thank you card. Unfortunately, we had the address wrong, and the card was returned to us in a mailbox my wife and I seldom check.

We would like to send them a new thank you card and apologize for the delay, however we're afraid of coming it coming across rudely. In addition, we're seeing them in person this Thanksgiving, so we aren't sure if that's a better time to address this. Here's the idea of a card we might write:

Dear (aunt and uncle).

Thank you for the beautiful widget. blah blah blah (stuff about widget). Also, we are so sorry you're just now getting this card! We wrote the address wrong the first time, and it was returned to a mailbox we don't check. Thank you again so much, and we can't wait to see you for Thanksgiving!

(standard closing)

Lord and Lady Farquaad

Is this a reasonable way to broach this? The other options we've considered are:

  1. Omitting an apology in the card, and offering one when we see them in person.
  2. To omit the apology in the card and not send it. When we see them this week, explain what happened and give them the card in person to "make sure they got it this time," but this sort of defeats the purpose of a card...

What's our best course of action here to make sure my aunt and uncle don't feel spurned? The gift is pretty nice, so they certainly deserve to feel recognized.

I recently got married a few months ago and received a nice gift from an aunt and uncle. We sent them a thank you card. Unfortunately, we had the address wrong, and the card was returned to us in a mailbox my wife and I seldom check.

We would like to send them a new thank you card and apologize for the delay, however we're afraid that sticking the apology in the card may come across rudely, or leave them feeling unappreciated. In addition, we're seeing them in person this Thanksgiving, so we aren't sure if that's a better time to address this. Here's the idea of a card we might write:

Dear (aunt and uncle).

Thank you for the beautiful widget. blah blah blah (stuff about widget). Also, we are so sorry you're just now getting this card! We wrote the address wrong the first time, and it was returned to a mailbox we don't check. Thank you again so much, and we can't wait to see you for Thanksgiving!

(standard closing)

Lord and Lady Farquaad

The wording isn't the significant part here. Mainly, I'm wondering if addressing the apology in the card like this is the correct approach. My wife and I have also considered the following options:

  1. Omitting an apology in the card, and offering one when we see them in person.
  2. To omit the apology in the card and not send it. When we see them this week, explain what happened and give them the card in person to "make sure they got it this time," but this sort of defeats the purpose of a card...

What's our best course of action here to make sure my aunt and uncle don't feel spurned? The gift is pretty nice, so they certainly deserve to feel recognized.

1
source | link

How to address I'm sending a thank you card late

I recently got married a few months ago and received a nice gift from an aunt and uncle. We sent them a thank you card. Unfortunately, we had the address wrong, and the card was returned to us in a mailbox my wife and I seldom check.

We would like to send them a new thank you card and apologize for the delay, however we're afraid of coming it coming across rudely. In addition, we're seeing them in person this Thanksgiving, so we aren't sure if that's a better time to address this. Here's the idea of a card we might write:

Dear (aunt and uncle).

Thank you for the beautiful widget. blah blah blah (stuff about widget). Also, we are so sorry you're just now getting this card! We wrote the address wrong the first time, and it was returned to a mailbox we don't check. Thank you again so much, and we can't wait to see you for Thanksgiving!

(standard closing)

Lord and Lady Farquaad

Is this a reasonable way to broach this? The other options we've considered are:

  1. Omitting an apology in the card, and offering one when we see them in person.
  2. To omit the apology in the card and not send it. When we see them this week, explain what happened and give them the card in person to "make sure they got it this time," but this sort of defeats the purpose of a card...

What's our best course of action here to make sure my aunt and uncle don't feel spurned? The gift is pretty nice, so they certainly deserve to feel recognized.