2 cleanup, style, partial rewrite
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This is not the kind of approach you wantedasked for, but it's one that hasn't been mentioned yet:

Send a claim, then a notice of default, then a debt collectorGo the legal route

Send a claim, then a notice of default, then a debt collector.

In the Netherlands, if someone owes you a debt you can send them a registered letter with a claim. If they don't pay within some reasonable (or legally defined, usually 2-4 week) period you specify in the letter, you can send them a second letter with a notice of default and a shorter deadline (e.g. 3 to 7 days). 

If they don't pay then, you can contact a debt collection agency. They will collect the money for you and if the sum is large enough they will arrange for some party to handlelegally take the restmoney and/or physical possessions (e.g. your furniture, this usually costsand perhaps random things to sell off) by means of a percentage orpermit, they then take a fixed sum or a percentage off the debt for themselves, but also charge the debtor for the services IIRC.

You should research your local laws, perhaps with the help of a local attorney, or call a debt collector and ask for help.

I would assume even the first letter would jolt your ex-roommate into action, even if just to protest your claim; at least you'll be in touch then.

If nothe doesn't repay you then, you have a way to proceed. I would add a line item for the cost of the furniture and add in the letter that that part of the debt can be paid in nature (= with the furniture).

I'm sorry I don't have a less confrontational approach at hand. I hopewish you get your situation fixedgood luck.

This is not the approach you wanted, but it's one that hasn't been mentioned yet:

Send a claim, then a notice of default, then a debt collector

In the Netherlands, if someone owes you a debt you can send them a registered letter with a claim. If they don't pay within some reasonable (or legally defined, usually 2-4 week) period you specify in the letter, you can send them a second letter with a notice of default and a shorter deadline (e.g. 3 to 7 days). If they don't pay then, you can contact a debt collection agency to handle the rest, this usually costs a percentage or a fixed sum off the debt.

I would assume even the first letter would jolt your ex-roommate into action, even if just to protest your claim; at least you'll be in touch then.

If not you have a way to proceed. I would add a line item for the cost of the furniture and add in the letter that that part of the debt can be paid in nature (= with the furniture).

I'm sorry I don't have a less confrontational approach at hand. I hope you get your situation fixed.

This is not the kind of approach you asked for, but it's one that hasn't been mentioned yet:

Go the legal route

Send a claim, then a notice of default, then a debt collector.

In the Netherlands, if someone owes you a debt you can send them a registered letter with a claim. If they don't pay within some reasonable (or legally defined, usually 2-4 week) period you specify in the letter, you can send them a second letter with a notice of default and a shorter deadline (e.g. 3 to 7 days). 

If they don't pay then, you can contact a debt collection agency. They will collect the money for you and if the sum is large enough they will arrange for some party to legally take the money and/or physical possessions (e.g. your furniture, and perhaps random things to sell off) by means of a permit, they then take a fixed sum or a percentage off the debt for themselves, but also charge the debtor for the services IIRC.

You should research your local laws, perhaps with the help of a local attorney, or call a debt collector and ask for help.

I would assume even the first letter would jolt your ex-roommate into action, even if just to protest your claim; at least you'll be in touch then.

If he doesn't repay you then, you have a way to proceed.

I wish you good luck.

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This is not the approach you wanted, but it's one that hasn't been mentioned yet:

Send a claim, then a notice of default, then a debt collector

In the Netherlands, if someone owes you a debt you can send them a registered letter with a claim. If they don't pay within some reasonable (or legally defined, usually 2-4 week) period you specify in the letter, you can send them a second letter with a notice of default and a shorter deadline (e.g. 3 to 7 days). If they don't pay then, you can contact a debt collection agency to handle the rest, this usually costs a percentage or a fixed sum off the debt.

I would assume even the first letter would jolt your ex-roommate into action, even if just to protest your claim; at least you'll be in touch then.

If not you have a way to proceed. I would add a line item for the cost of the furniture and add in the letter that that part of the debt can be paid in nature (= with the furniture).

I'm sorry I don't have a less confrontational approach at hand. I hope you get your situation fixed.