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18 Fixed some grammar. Minor edit.
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My sister is in the hospital. She’s a smoker and has run out of cigarettes and is asking me to bring her more. She is not hospitalized because of her smoking.

I strongly disagree with smoking and feel like I would be encouraging/condoning it by bringing her cigarettes and I have therefore said I won’t bring her any cigarettes.

I have already made some concessions, as much as it pained me, and took her outside in a wheelchair to smoke her last cigarette.

She’s constantly asking me to bring her some. I know if she asked the nurses, they would give her a nicotine patch/gum/nicotine product if the cravings are the issue and she knows that too, so I don't think nicotine withdrawal is the issue here. I think she just wants to smoke.

She’s mainly targeting me as she knows I’m most likely to cave in and bring her cigarettes but has asked others, who have also said no. Her friends that smoke won’t be visiting until later today.

I’m not trying to force her to stop or even asking her to stop. I’m asking her to stop asking me to condone it and assist her with it. I'm not worried about her resenting me for that, as I know such resentment would not be long-lived once she's found someone else to go get the cigarettes for her. Minimising this would simply be an added bonus, a secondary objective if you will.

How can I get her to respect my beliefs and stop asking me to help her smoke?


This question is not about whether it’s right or wrong to give her cigarettes.
Suggestions on compromises maybe helpful but (in general) telling me why I should or shouldn’t assist her to smoke doesn’t answer the question and I think is off topic-topic and possibly a topic for Biology.SE. I know and understand the arguments for and against. I agree with the hospital, who’swhose policy is to provide treatment for nicotine withdrawal but not to encourage or condone smoking.


I have been one of the main people helping her and providing support in general, when. When she was admitted I went 3 days with little sleep and spent every available hour helping her so I would ask you to please hold the “bad brother” comments.

The total time between her running out and a friend bringing her cigarettes was comparable to a long haul flight, she was otherwise fine and ready for discharge (basically final day of monitoring before going home).

My sister is in the hospital. She’s a smoker and has run out of cigarettes and is asking me to bring her more. She is not hospitalized because of her smoking.

I strongly disagree with smoking and feel like I would be encouraging/condoning it by bringing her cigarettes and I have therefore said I won’t bring her any cigarettes.

I have already made some concessions, as much as it pained me, and took her outside in a wheelchair to smoke her last cigarette.

She’s constantly asking me to bring her some. I know if she asked the nurses, they would give her a nicotine patch/gum/nicotine product if the cravings are the issue and she knows that too, so I don't think nicotine withdrawal is the issue here. I think she just wants to smoke.

She’s mainly targeting me as she knows I’m most likely to cave in and bring her cigarettes but has asked others, who have also said no. Her friends that smoke won’t be visiting until later today.

I’m not trying to force her to stop or even asking her to stop. I’m asking her to stop asking me to condone it and assist her with it. I'm not worried about her resenting me for that, as I know such resentment would not be long-lived once she's found someone else to go get the cigarettes for her. Minimising this would simply be an added bonus, a secondary objective if you will.

How can I get her to respect my beliefs and stop asking me to help her smoke?


This question is not about whether it’s right or wrong to give her cigarettes.
Suggestions on compromises maybe helpful but (in general) telling me why I should or shouldn’t assist her to smoke doesn’t answer the question and I think is off topic and possibly a topic for Biology.SE. I know and understand the arguments for and against. I agree with the hospital, who’s policy is to provide treatment for nicotine withdrawal but not to encourage or condone smoking.


I have been one of the main people helping her and providing support in general, when she was admitted I went 3 days with little sleep and spent every available hour helping her so I would ask you to please hold the “bad brother” comments.

The total time between her running out and a friend bringing her cigarettes was comparable to a long haul flight, she was otherwise fine and ready for discharge (basically final day of monitoring before going home).

My sister is in the hospital. She’s a smoker and has run out of cigarettes and is asking me to bring her more. She is not hospitalized because of her smoking.

I strongly disagree with smoking and feel like I would be encouraging/condoning it by bringing her cigarettes and I have therefore said I won’t bring her any cigarettes.

I have already made some concessions, as much as it pained me, and took her outside in a wheelchair to smoke her last cigarette.

She’s constantly asking me to bring her some. I know if she asked the nurses, they would give her a nicotine patch/gum/nicotine product if the cravings are the issue and she knows that too, so I don't think nicotine withdrawal is the issue here. I think she just wants to smoke.

She’s mainly targeting me as she knows I’m most likely to cave in and bring her cigarettes but has asked others, who have also said no. Her friends that smoke won’t be visiting until later today.

I’m not trying to force her to stop or even asking her to stop. I’m asking her to stop asking me to condone it and assist her with it. I'm not worried about her resenting me for that, as I know such resentment would not be long-lived once she's found someone else to go get the cigarettes for her. Minimising this would simply be an added bonus, a secondary objective if you will.

How can I get her to respect my beliefs and stop asking me to help her smoke?


This question is not about whether it’s right or wrong to give her cigarettes.
Suggestions on compromises maybe helpful but (in general) telling me why I should or shouldn’t assist her to smoke doesn’t answer the question and I think is off-topic and possibly a topic for Biology.SE. I know and understand the arguments for and against. I agree with the hospital, whose policy is to provide treatment for nicotine withdrawal but not to encourage or condone smoking.


I have been one of the main people helping her and providing support in general. When she was admitted I went 3 days with little sleep and spent every available hour helping her so I would ask you to please hold the “bad brother” comments.

The total time between her running out and a friend bringing her cigarettes was comparable to a long haul flight, she was otherwise fine and ready for discharge (basically final day of monitoring before going home).

17 Fixed spellings of Cigarettes and removed the redundant "agree"
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My sister is in the hospital. She’s a smoker and has run out of cigarettes and is asking me to bring her more. She is not hospitalized because of her smoking.

I strongly disagree agree with smoking and feel like I would be encouraging/condoning it by bringing her cigarettes and I have therefore said I won’t bring her any cigerettescigarettes.

I have already made some concessions, as much as it pained me, and took her outside in a wheelchair to smoke her last cigarette.

She’s constantly asking me to bring her some. I know if she asked the nurses, they would give her a nicotine patch/gum/nicotine product if the cravings are the issue and she knows that too, so I don't think nicotine withdrawal is the issue here. I think she just wants to smoke.

She’s mainly targeting me as she knows I’m most likely to cave in and bring her cigarettes but has asked others, who have also said no. Her friends that smoke won’t be visiting until later today.

I’m not trying to force her to stop or even asking her to stop. I’m asking her to stop asking me to condone it and assist her with it. I'm not worried about her resenting me for that, as I know such resentment would not be long-lived once she's found someone else to go get the cigarettes for her. Minimising this would simply be an added bonus, a secondary objective if you will.

How can I get her to respect my beliefs and stop asking me to help her smoke?


This question is not about whether it’s right or wrong to give her cigarettes.
Suggestions on compromises maybe helpful but (in general) telling me why I should or shouldn’t assist her to smoke doesn’t answer the question and I think is off topic and possibly a topic for Biology.SE. I know and understand the arguments for and against. I agree with the hospital, who’s policy is to provide treatment for nicotine withdrawal but not to encourage or condone smoking.


I have been one of the main people helping her and providing support in general, when she was admitted I went 3 days with little sleep and spent every available hour helping her so I would ask you to please hold the “bad brother” comments.

The total time between her running out and a friend bringing her cigarettes was comparable to a long haul flight, she was otherwise fine and ready for discharge (basically final day of monitoring before going home).

My sister is in the hospital. She’s a smoker and has run out of cigarettes and is asking me to bring her more. She is not hospitalized because of her smoking.

I strongly disagree agree with smoking and feel like I would be encouraging/condoning it by bringing her cigarettes and I have therefore said I won’t bring her any cigerettes.

I have already made some concessions, as much as it pained me, and took her outside in a wheelchair to smoke her last cigarette.

She’s constantly asking me to bring her some. I know if she asked the nurses, they would give her a nicotine patch/gum/nicotine product if the cravings are the issue and she knows that too, so I don't think nicotine withdrawal is the issue here. I think she just wants to smoke.

She’s mainly targeting me as she knows I’m most likely to cave in and bring her cigarettes but has asked others, who have also said no. Her friends that smoke won’t be visiting until later today.

I’m not trying to force her to stop or even asking her to stop. I’m asking her to stop asking me to condone it and assist her with it. I'm not worried about her resenting me for that, as I know such resentment would not be long-lived once she's found someone else to go get the cigarettes for her. Minimising this would simply be an added bonus, a secondary objective if you will.

How can I get her to respect my beliefs and stop asking me to help her smoke?


This question is not about whether it’s right or wrong to give her cigarettes.
Suggestions on compromises maybe helpful but (in general) telling me why I should or shouldn’t assist her to smoke doesn’t answer the question and I think is off topic and possibly a topic for Biology.SE. I know and understand the arguments for and against. I agree with the hospital, who’s policy is to provide treatment for nicotine withdrawal but not to encourage or condone smoking.


I have been one of the main people helping her and providing support in general, when she was admitted I went 3 days with little sleep and spent every available hour helping her so I would ask you to please hold the “bad brother” comments.

The total time between her running out and a friend bringing her cigarettes was comparable to a long haul flight, she was otherwise fine and ready for discharge (basically final day of monitoring before going home).

My sister is in the hospital. She’s a smoker and has run out of cigarettes and is asking me to bring her more. She is not hospitalized because of her smoking.

I strongly disagree with smoking and feel like I would be encouraging/condoning it by bringing her cigarettes and I have therefore said I won’t bring her any cigarettes.

I have already made some concessions, as much as it pained me, and took her outside in a wheelchair to smoke her last cigarette.

She’s constantly asking me to bring her some. I know if she asked the nurses, they would give her a nicotine patch/gum/nicotine product if the cravings are the issue and she knows that too, so I don't think nicotine withdrawal is the issue here. I think she just wants to smoke.

She’s mainly targeting me as she knows I’m most likely to cave in and bring her cigarettes but has asked others, who have also said no. Her friends that smoke won’t be visiting until later today.

I’m not trying to force her to stop or even asking her to stop. I’m asking her to stop asking me to condone it and assist her with it. I'm not worried about her resenting me for that, as I know such resentment would not be long-lived once she's found someone else to go get the cigarettes for her. Minimising this would simply be an added bonus, a secondary objective if you will.

How can I get her to respect my beliefs and stop asking me to help her smoke?


This question is not about whether it’s right or wrong to give her cigarettes.
Suggestions on compromises maybe helpful but (in general) telling me why I should or shouldn’t assist her to smoke doesn’t answer the question and I think is off topic and possibly a topic for Biology.SE. I know and understand the arguments for and against. I agree with the hospital, who’s policy is to provide treatment for nicotine withdrawal but not to encourage or condone smoking.


I have been one of the main people helping her and providing support in general, when she was admitted I went 3 days with little sleep and spent every available hour helping her so I would ask you to please hold the “bad brother” comments.

The total time between her running out and a friend bringing her cigarettes was comparable to a long haul flight, she was otherwise fine and ready for discharge (basically final day of monitoring before going home).

16 added 92 characters in body
source | link

My sister is in the hospital. She’s a smoker and has run out of cigarettes and is asking me to bring her more. She is not hospitalized because of her smoking.

I strongly disagree agree with smoking and feel like I would be encouraging/condoning it by bringing her cigarettes and I have therefore said I won’t bring her any cigerettes.

I have already made some concessions, as much as it pained me, and took her outside in a wheelchair to smoke her last cigarette.

She’s constantly asking me to bring her some. I know if she asked the nurses, they would give her a nicotine patch/gum/nicotine product if the cravings are the issue and she knows that too, so I don't think nicotine withdrawal is the issue here. I think she just wants to smoke.

She’s mainly targeting me as she knows I’m most likely to cave in and bring her cigarettes but has asked others, who have also said no. Her friends that smoke won’t be visiting until later today.

I’m not trying to force her to stop or even asking her to stop. I’m asking her to stop asking me to condone it and assist her with it. I'm not worried about her resenting me for that, as I know such resentment would not be long-lived once she's found someone else to go get the cigarettes for her. Minimising this would simply be an added bonus, a secondary objective if you will.

How can I get her to respect my beliefs and stop asking me to help her smoke?


This question is not about whether it’s right or wrong to give her cigarettes.
Suggestions on compromises maybe helpful but (in general) telling me why I should or shouldn’t assist her to smoke doesn’t answer the question and I think is off topic and possibly a topic for Biology.SE. I know and understand the arguments for and against. I agree with the hospital, who’s policy is to provide treatment for nicotine withdrawal but not to encourage or condone smoking.


I have been one of the main people helping her and providing support in general, when she was admitted I went 3 days with little sleep and spent every available hour helping her so I would ask you to please hold the “bad brother” comments.

The total time between her running out and a friend bringing her cigarettes was comparable to a long haul flight, she was otherwise fine and ready for discharge (basically final day of monitoring before going home).

My sister is in the hospital. She’s a smoker and has run out of cigarettes and is asking me to bring her more. She is not hospitalized because of her smoking.

I strongly disagree agree with smoking and feel like I would be encouraging/condoning it by bringing her cigarettes and I have therefore said I won’t bring her any cigerettes.

I have already made some concessions, as much as it pained me, and took her outside in a wheelchair to smoke her last cigarette.

She’s constantly asking me to bring her some. I know if she asked the nurses, they would give her a nicotine patch/gum/nicotine product if the cravings are the issue and she knows that too, so I don't think nicotine withdrawal is the issue here. I think she just wants to smoke.

She’s mainly targeting me as she knows I’m most likely to cave in and bring her cigarettes but has asked others, who have also said no. Her friends that smoke won’t be visiting until later today.

I’m not trying to force her to stop or even asking her to stop. I’m asking her to stop asking me to condone it and assist her with it. I'm not worried about her resenting me for that, such resentment would not be long-lived once she's found someone else to go get the cigarettes for her.

How can I get her to respect my beliefs and stop asking me to help her smoke?


This question is not about whether it’s right or wrong to give her cigarettes.
Suggestions on compromises maybe helpful but (in general) telling me why I should or shouldn’t assist her to smoke doesn’t answer the question and I think is off topic and possibly a topic for Biology.SE. I know and understand the arguments for and against. I agree with the hospital, who’s policy is to provide treatment for nicotine withdrawal but not to encourage or condone smoking.


I have been one of the main people helping her and providing support in general, when she was admitted I went 3 days with little sleep and spent every available hour helping her so I would ask you to please hold the “bad brother” comments.

The total time between her running out and a friend bringing her cigarettes was comparable to a long haul flight, she was otherwise fine and ready for discharge (basically final day of monitoring before going home).

My sister is in the hospital. She’s a smoker and has run out of cigarettes and is asking me to bring her more. She is not hospitalized because of her smoking.

I strongly disagree agree with smoking and feel like I would be encouraging/condoning it by bringing her cigarettes and I have therefore said I won’t bring her any cigerettes.

I have already made some concessions, as much as it pained me, and took her outside in a wheelchair to smoke her last cigarette.

She’s constantly asking me to bring her some. I know if she asked the nurses, they would give her a nicotine patch/gum/nicotine product if the cravings are the issue and she knows that too, so I don't think nicotine withdrawal is the issue here. I think she just wants to smoke.

She’s mainly targeting me as she knows I’m most likely to cave in and bring her cigarettes but has asked others, who have also said no. Her friends that smoke won’t be visiting until later today.

I’m not trying to force her to stop or even asking her to stop. I’m asking her to stop asking me to condone it and assist her with it. I'm not worried about her resenting me for that, as I know such resentment would not be long-lived once she's found someone else to go get the cigarettes for her. Minimising this would simply be an added bonus, a secondary objective if you will.

How can I get her to respect my beliefs and stop asking me to help her smoke?


This question is not about whether it’s right or wrong to give her cigarettes.
Suggestions on compromises maybe helpful but (in general) telling me why I should or shouldn’t assist her to smoke doesn’t answer the question and I think is off topic and possibly a topic for Biology.SE. I know and understand the arguments for and against. I agree with the hospital, who’s policy is to provide treatment for nicotine withdrawal but not to encourage or condone smoking.


I have been one of the main people helping her and providing support in general, when she was admitted I went 3 days with little sleep and spent every available hour helping her so I would ask you to please hold the “bad brother” comments.

The total time between her running out and a friend bringing her cigarettes was comparable to a long haul flight, she was otherwise fine and ready for discharge (basically final day of monitoring before going home).

15 Added the resentment bit
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14 added 66 characters in body; deleted 39 characters in body
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13 added 347 characters in body
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12 Edited in something you commented, it might people help give better focused answers. I'll leave the 'disclaimer' for now. I asked a moderator if they could provide a 'post notice' https://interpersonal.meta.stackexchange.com/q/2047/1599 to stop the arguing. Hope it helps!
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11 added 121 characters in body; added 183 characters in body
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10 added 316 characters in body
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9 added 26 characters in body
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8 Brought additional information from OP's comment into the fold of the question
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7 Brought additional information from OP's comment into the fold of the question
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6 spelling fixes, formulation changes, some spelling out. Clarification of word use
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5 Titles should be as specific as possible. If it's no longer about buying cigarettes alone, but helping her smoke in general, the title should reflect that. There should be no need to read the entire body of the question to understand what the title is supposed to mean.
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4 Clarified it’s not just about buying cigarettes but about helping smoke in general.
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3 Rollback to Revision 1
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2 added 10 characters in body; edited title
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1
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