Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
3 added 35 characters in body
source | link

If there is a rule against playing loud music or not doesn't really matter. You don't have the "Hausrecht" as a passenger.

That out of the way, you can of course in a first step try to appeal to his "common sense" or make the person aware.

But if that doesn't work - don't engage yourself any further. Please always turn to a person with authority. That is in case of a train: A conductor, private security, Bahn-Security, Landespolizei (formerly known as Bundesgrenzschutz).

Escalating it does not have any benefit for you. It only raises the chance of being harmed.

If no conductor (or similar) is available value your health higher than an inconvenience. We don't need another headline like "Woman beaten to hospital over dispute about loud music" ...


I also like to pick up on a line of one of your comments:

"But I am physically stronger than he was, although it was probably not obvious, as I'm female."

I wouldn't take any chances there. Personally, I have a background of 30+ years of martial arts and still (or better because of that) I would never engage an obviously hostile individual. That's what authorities are there (and trained) for - "to serve and to protect" ( German: "Ihr Freund und Helfer").

Once injured, what does it help you if you have been in the right?

If there is a rule against playing loud music or not doesn't really matter. You don't have the "Hausrecht" as a passenger.

That out of the way, you can of course in a first step try to appeal to his "common sense" or make the person aware.

But if that doesn't work - don't engage yourself any further. Please always turn to a person with authority. That is in case of a train: A conductor, private security, Bahn-Security, Landespolizei (formerly known as Bundesgrenzschutz).

Escalating it does not have any benefit for you. It only raises the chance of being harmed.

If no conductor (or similar) is available value your health higher than an inconvenience. We don't need another headline like "Woman beaten to hospital over dispute about loud music" ...


I also like to pick up on a line of one of your comments:

"But I am physically stronger than he was, although it was probably not obvious, as I'm female."

I wouldn't take any chances there. Personally, I have a background of 30+ years of martial arts and still (or better because of that) I would never engage an obviously hostile individual. That's what authorities are there (and trained) for - "to serve and to protect".

Once injured, what does it help you if you have been in the right?

If there is a rule against playing loud music or not doesn't really matter. You don't have the "Hausrecht" as a passenger.

That out of the way, you can of course in a first step try to appeal to his "common sense" or make the person aware.

But if that doesn't work - don't engage yourself any further. Please always turn to a person with authority. That is in case of a train: A conductor, private security, Bahn-Security, Landespolizei (formerly known as Bundesgrenzschutz).

Escalating it does not have any benefit for you. It only raises the chance of being harmed.

If no conductor (or similar) is available value your health higher than an inconvenience. We don't need another headline like "Woman beaten to hospital over dispute about loud music" ...


I also like to pick up on a line of one of your comments:

"But I am physically stronger than he was, although it was probably not obvious, as I'm female."

I wouldn't take any chances there. Personally, I have a background of 30+ years of martial arts and still (or better because of that) I would never engage an obviously hostile individual. That's what authorities are there (and trained) for - "to serve and to protect" ( German: "Ihr Freund und Helfer").

Once injured, what does it help you if you have been in the right?

2 added 514 characters in body
source | link

If there is a rule against playing loud music or not doesn't really matter. You don't have the "Hausrecht" as a passenger.

That out of the way, you can of course in a first step try to appeal to his "common sense" or make the person aware.

But if that doesn't work - don't engage yourself any further. Please always turn to a person with authority. That is in case of a train: A conductor, private security, Bahn-Security, Landespolizei (formerly known as Bundesgrenzschutz).

Escalating it does not have any benefit for you. It only raises the chance of being harmed.

If no conductor (or similar) is available value your health higher than an inconvenience. We don't need another headline like "Woman beaten to hospital over dispute about loud music" ...


I also like to pick up on a line of one of your comments:

"But I am physically stronger than he was, although it was probably not obvious, as I'm female."

I wouldn't take any chances there. Personally, I have a background of 30+ years of martial arts and still (or better because of that) I would never engage an obviously hostile individual. That's what authorities are there (and trained) for - "to serve and to protect".

Once injured, what does it help you if you have been in the right?

If there is a rule against playing loud music or not doesn't really matter. You don't have the "Hausrecht" as a passenger.

That out of the way, you can of course in a first step try to appeal to his "common sense" or make the person aware.

But if that doesn't work - don't engage yourself any further. Please always turn to a person with authority. That is in case of a train: A conductor, private security, Bahn-Security, Landespolizei (formerly known as Bundesgrenzschutz).

Escalating it does not have any benefit for you. It only raises the chance of being harmed.

If no conductor (or similar) is available value your health higher than an inconvenience. We don't need another headline like "Woman beaten to hospital over dispute about loud music" ...

If there is a rule against playing loud music or not doesn't really matter. You don't have the "Hausrecht" as a passenger.

That out of the way, you can of course in a first step try to appeal to his "common sense" or make the person aware.

But if that doesn't work - don't engage yourself any further. Please always turn to a person with authority. That is in case of a train: A conductor, private security, Bahn-Security, Landespolizei (formerly known as Bundesgrenzschutz).

Escalating it does not have any benefit for you. It only raises the chance of being harmed.

If no conductor (or similar) is available value your health higher than an inconvenience. We don't need another headline like "Woman beaten to hospital over dispute about loud music" ...


I also like to pick up on a line of one of your comments:

"But I am physically stronger than he was, although it was probably not obvious, as I'm female."

I wouldn't take any chances there. Personally, I have a background of 30+ years of martial arts and still (or better because of that) I would never engage an obviously hostile individual. That's what authorities are there (and trained) for - "to serve and to protect".

Once injured, what does it help you if you have been in the right?

1
source | link

If there is a rule against playing loud music or not doesn't really matter. You don't have the "Hausrecht" as a passenger.

That out of the way, you can of course in a first step try to appeal to his "common sense" or make the person aware.

But if that doesn't work - don't engage yourself any further. Please always turn to a person with authority. That is in case of a train: A conductor, private security, Bahn-Security, Landespolizei (formerly known as Bundesgrenzschutz).

Escalating it does not have any benefit for you. It only raises the chance of being harmed.

If no conductor (or similar) is available value your health higher than an inconvenience. We don't need another headline like "Woman beaten to hospital over dispute about loud music" ...