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I've been using DNA testing to supplement my genealogical research and have made the rather startling discovery that the man thatwhom I knew as my paternal grandfather, was not in fact my father's biological father.

I first tested myself and my father on 23andme, with the expected result that my father was my biological father. II then tested my paternal grandmother, again with the expected result that she was my father's biological mother. HoweverHowever, when I started exploring my father's non-maternal matches, I could not tie any of them into my grandfather's side of my tree. ThisThis was when I started suspecting a non-paternal event of some type.

I recently became confident in my suspicions when my cousin (my father's niece) uploaded her AncestryDNA results to gedmatch. SheShe matched as expected to my father's maternal phasing, but not at all to his paternal phasing. AdditionallyAdditionally, she matched strongly to a third cousin on my (non-biological) grandfather's side of the family, so I think I can rule out another non-paternal event in her ancestry.

By researching the trees of some of the genetic matches to my father and finding crossover, I believe I have a good theory on who his biological father might actually be.

Both non-biological and potential biological grandfathers are deceased.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father, but how do I tell him? Do I tell him privately or with the rest of my family present? Do I prepare a presentation to try to prove it if he is resistant to the idea? Do I tell him my theory on who I believe to be his biological father? Do I contact the biological father's other family? Also, my paternal grandmother is still alive but suffering from dementia - do I bring this up with her, especially assuming it was a secret she may never have wanted to be revealed?

TL;DR:

My father's father was not his biological father. How do I approach bringing this up with my family?

I've been using DNA testing to supplement my genealogical research and have made the rather startling discovery that the man that I knew as my paternal grandfather, was not in fact my father's biological father.

I first tested myself and my father on 23andme, with the expected result that my father was my biological father. I then tested my paternal grandmother, again with the expected result that she was my father's biological mother. However, when I started exploring my father's non-maternal matches, I could not tie any of them into my grandfather's side of my tree. This was when I started suspecting a non-paternal event of some type.

I recently became confident in my suspicions when my cousin (my father's niece) uploaded her AncestryDNA results to gedmatch. She matched as expected to my father's maternal phasing, but not at all to his paternal phasing. Additionally, she matched strongly to a third cousin on my (non-biological) grandfather's side of the family, so I think I can rule out another non-paternal event in her ancestry.

By researching the trees of some of the genetic matches to my father and finding crossover, I believe I have a good theory on who his biological father might actually be.

Both non-biological and potential biological grandfathers are deceased.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father, but how do I tell him? Do I tell him privately or with the rest of my family present? Do I prepare a presentation to try to prove it if he is resistant to the idea? Do I tell him my theory on who I believe to be his biological father? Do I contact the biological father's other family? Also, my paternal grandmother is still alive but suffering from dementia - do I bring this up with her, especially assuming it was a secret she may never have wanted to be revealed?

TL;DR:

My father's father was not his biological father. How do I approach bringing this up with my family?

I've been using DNA testing to supplement my genealogical research and have made the rather startling discovery that the man whom I knew as my paternal grandfather was not in fact my father's biological father.

I first tested myself and my father on 23andme, with the expected result that my father was my biological father. I then tested my paternal grandmother, again with the expected result that she was my father's biological mother. However, when I started exploring my father's non-maternal matches, I could not tie any of them into my grandfather's side of my tree. This was when I started suspecting a non-paternal event of some type.

I recently became confident in my suspicions when my cousin (my father's niece) uploaded her AncestryDNA results to gedmatch. She matched as expected to my father's maternal phasing, but not at all to his paternal phasing. Additionally, she matched strongly to a third cousin on my (non-biological) grandfather's side of the family, so I think I can rule out another non-paternal event in her ancestry.

By researching the trees of some of the genetic matches to my father and finding crossover, I believe I have a good theory on who his biological father might actually be.

Both non-biological and potential biological grandfathers are deceased.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father, but how do I tell him? Do I tell him privately or with the rest of my family present? Do I prepare a presentation to try to prove it if he is resistant to the idea? Do I tell him my theory on who I believe to be his biological father? Do I contact the biological father's other family? Also, my paternal grandmother is still alive but suffering from dementia - do I bring this up with her, especially assuming it was a secret she may never have wanted to be revealed?

TL;DR:

My father's father was not his biological father. How do I approach bringing this up with my family?

    Notice added Authoritative reference needed by The Wraith
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3 Fixed grammatical error in title resulting from previous edit
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How do I reveal to my father that his father is not his biological father?

2 Edited grammar and tags.
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How todo I reveal tomy father that his father is not his biological father?

I've been using DNA testing to supplement my genealogical research and have made athe rather startling discovery that the man that I knew as my paternal grandfather, was not in fact my father's biological father.

I first tested myself and my father on 23andme, with the expected result that my father was my biological father. I then tested my paternal grandmother, again with the expected result that she was my father's biological mother. However, when I started exploring my father's non-maternal matches, I could not tie any of them into my grandfather's side of my tree. This was when I started suspecting a non-paternal event of some type.

I recently became confident in my suspicions when my cousin (my father's niece) uploaded her AncestryDNA results to gedmatch. She matched as expected to my father's maternal phasing, but not at all to his paternal phasing. Additionally, she matched strongly to a third cousin on my (non-biological) grandfather's side of the family, so I think I can rule out another non-paternal event in her ancestry.

By researching the trees of some of the genetic matches to my father and finding crossover, I believe I have a good theory on who his biological father might actually be.

Both non-biological and potential biological grandfathers are deceased.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father, but how do I tell him? Do I tell him privately or with the rest of my family present? Do I prepare a presentation to try to prove it if he is resistant to the idea? Do I tell him my theory on who I believe to be his biological father? Do I contact the biological father's other family? Also, my paternal grandmother is still alive but suffering from dementia - do I bring this up with her, especially assuming it was a secret she may never have wanted to be revealed?

TL;DR:

Father'sMy father's father was not his biological father, how to. How do I approach bringing this up with my family?

How to reveal to father that his father is not his biological father?

I've been using DNA testing to supplement my genealogical research and have made a rather startling discovery that the man that I knew as my paternal grandfather, was not in fact my father's biological father.

I first tested myself and my father on 23andme, with the expected result that my father was my biological father. I then tested my paternal grandmother, again with the expected result that she was my father's biological mother. However, when I started exploring my father's non-maternal matches, I could not tie any of them into my grandfather's side of my tree. This was when I started suspecting a non-paternal event of some type.

I recently became confident in my suspicions when my cousin (my father's niece) uploaded her AncestryDNA results to gedmatch. She matched as expected to my father's maternal phasing, but not at all to his paternal phasing. Additionally, she matched strongly to a third cousin on my (non-biological) grandfather's side of the family, so I think I can rule out another non-paternal event in her ancestry.

By researching the trees of some of the genetic matches to my father and finding crossover, I believe I have a good theory on who his biological father might actually be.

Both non-biological and potential biological grandfathers are deceased.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father, but how do I tell him? Do I tell him privately or with the rest of my family present? Do I prepare a presentation to try to prove it if he is resistant to the idea? Do I tell him my theory on who I believe to be his biological father? Do I contact the biological father's other family? Also, my paternal grandmother is still alive but suffering from dementia - do I bring this up with her, especially assuming it was a secret she may never have wanted to be revealed?

TL;DR:

Father's father was not his biological father, how to I approach bringing this up with family?

How do I reveal my father that his father is not his biological father?

I've been using DNA testing to supplement my genealogical research and have made the rather startling discovery that the man that I knew as my paternal grandfather, was not in fact my father's biological father.

I first tested myself and my father on 23andme, with the expected result that my father was my biological father. I then tested my paternal grandmother, again with the expected result that she was my father's biological mother. However, when I started exploring my father's non-maternal matches, I could not tie any of them into my grandfather's side of my tree. This was when I started suspecting a non-paternal event of some type.

I recently became confident in my suspicions when my cousin (my father's niece) uploaded her AncestryDNA results to gedmatch. She matched as expected to my father's maternal phasing, but not at all to his paternal phasing. Additionally, she matched strongly to a third cousin on my (non-biological) grandfather's side of the family, so I think I can rule out another non-paternal event in her ancestry.

By researching the trees of some of the genetic matches to my father and finding crossover, I believe I have a good theory on who his biological father might actually be.

Both non-biological and potential biological grandfathers are deceased.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father, but how do I tell him? Do I tell him privately or with the rest of my family present? Do I prepare a presentation to try to prove it if he is resistant to the idea? Do I tell him my theory on who I believe to be his biological father? Do I contact the biological father's other family? Also, my paternal grandmother is still alive but suffering from dementia - do I bring this up with her, especially assuming it was a secret she may never have wanted to be revealed?

TL;DR:

My father's father was not his biological father. How do I approach bringing this up with my family?

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