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The earlier answer by @Geoffrey Brent is technically absolutely correct. May I only add from the interpersonal aspect (pardon my being so frank, but the situation calls for it) that it would be highly unethical of you to go ahead on your own initiative and break any such unsolicited life-changing information to your father, and probably very hurtful as well.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father.

That is a unilateral and potentially dangerous assumption, which you can validly make only if your father comes to know of your research and explicitly asks you about his biological parentage.

Otherwise,

How can you be sure your father wants to know?

So don't do it. That is the only honest answer I can give you (and in good conscience could not avoid posting, in case you hadn't thought of this aspect) although you asked "how to do it."

Parentage is a very serious and very sensitive matter, and your father will not thank you for giving him this huge psychological shock which can change his life, affect his whole self-image and make him a very unhappy person.

Maybe you feel the need to unburden yourself of this secret? But that is unfortunately what can happen if you go testing your family's DNA, and possibly without their legally valid consent as noted by @Geoffrey Brent. Please consider the consequences. You cannot tell anybody without risking your father finding out, and it could seriously damage your personal relationship with your father.

If your father asks you point-blank and convinces you that he really wants to know about his biological parentage, thenthen you might consider telling him, andbut strictly in private with nobody else present.

Otherwise keep it to yourself, your father doesn't need to know.

The earlier answer by @Geoffrey Brent is technically absolutely correct. May I only add from the interpersonal aspect (pardon my being so frank, but the situation calls for it) that it would be highly unethical of you to go ahead on your own initiative and break any such unsolicited life-changing information to your father, and probably very hurtful as well.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father.

That is a unilateral and potentially dangerous assumption, which you can validly make only if your father comes to know of your research and explicitly asks you about his biological parentage.

Otherwise,

How can you be sure your father wants to know?

So don't do it. That is the only honest answer I can give you (and in good conscience could not avoid posting, in case you hadn't thought of this aspect) although you asked "how to do it."

Parentage is a very serious and very sensitive matter, and your father will not thank you for giving him this huge psychological shock which can change his life, affect his whole self-image and make him a very unhappy person.

Maybe you feel the need to unburden yourself of this secret? But that is unfortunately what can happen if you go testing your family's DNA, and possibly without their legally valid consent as noted by @Geoffrey Brent. Please consider the consequences. You cannot tell anybody without risking your father finding out, and it could seriously damage your personal relationship with your father.

If your father asks you point-blank and convinces you that he really wants to know about his biological parentage, then you might consider telling him, and strictly in private with nobody else present.

Otherwise keep it to yourself, your father doesn't need to know.

The earlier answer by @Geoffrey Brent is technically absolutely correct. May I only add from the interpersonal aspect (pardon my being so frank, but the situation calls for it) that it would be highly unethical of you to go ahead on your own initiative and break any such unsolicited life-changing information to your father, and probably very hurtful as well.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father.

That is a unilateral and potentially dangerous assumption, which you can validly make only if your father comes to know of your research and explicitly asks you about his biological parentage.

Otherwise,

How can you be sure your father wants to know?

So don't do it. That is the only honest answer I can give you (and in good conscience could not avoid posting, in case you hadn't thought of this aspect) although you asked "how to do it."

Parentage is a very serious and very sensitive matter, and your father will not thank you for giving him this huge psychological shock which can change his life, affect his whole self-image and make him a very unhappy person.

Maybe you feel the need to unburden yourself of this secret? But that is unfortunately what can happen if you go testing your family's DNA, and possibly without their legally valid consent as noted by @Geoffrey Brent. Please consider the consequences. You cannot tell anybody without risking your father finding out, and it could seriously damage your personal relationship with your father.

If your father asks you point-blank and convinces you that he really wants to know about his biological parentage, then you might consider telling him, but strictly in private with nobody else present.

Otherwise keep it to yourself, your father doesn't need to know.

8 added 12 characters in body
source | link

The earlier answer by @Geoffrey Brent is technically absolutely correct. May I only add from the interpersonal aspect that (pardon my being so frank, but the situation calls for it) that it would be highly unethical of you to go ahead on your own initiative and break any such unsolicited life-changing information to your father, and probably very hurtful as well.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father.

That is a unilateral and potentially dangerous assumption, which you can validly make only if your father comes to know of your research and explicitly asks you about his biological parentage.

Otherwise,

How can you be sure your father wants to know?

So don't do it. That is the only honest answer I can give you (and in good conscience could not avoid posting, in case you hadn't thought of this aspect) although you asked "how to do it."

Parentage is a very serious and very sensitive matter, and your father will not thank you for giving him this huge psychological shock which can change his life, affect his whole self-image and make him a very unhappy person.

Maybe you feel the need to unburden yourself of this secret? But that is unfortunately what can happen if you go testing your family's DNA, and possibly without their legally valid consent as noted by @Geoffrey Brent. Please consider the consequences. You cannot tell anybody without risking your father finding out, and it could possiblyseriously damage your personal relationship with your father.

If your father asks you point-blank and convinces you that he really wants to know about his biological parentage, then you might consider telling him, and strictly in private with nobody else present.

Otherwise keep it to yourself, your father doesn't need to know.

The earlier answer by @Geoffrey Brent is technically absolutely correct. May I only add from the interpersonal aspect that (pardon my being so frank, but the situation calls for it) it would be highly unethical of you to go ahead on your own initiative and break any such life-changing information to your father, and probably very hurtful as well.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father.

That is a unilateral and potentially dangerous assumption, which you can validly make only if your father comes to know of your research and explicitly asks you about his biological parentage.

Otherwise,

How can you be sure your father wants to know?

So don't do it. That is the only honest answer I can give you (and in good conscience could not avoid posting, in case you hadn't thought of this aspect) although you asked "how to do it."

Parentage is a very serious and very sensitive matter, and your father will not thank you for giving him this huge psychological shock which can change his life, affect his whole self-image and make him a very unhappy person.

Maybe you feel the need to unburden yourself of this secret? But that is unfortunately what can happen if you go testing your family's DNA, and possibly without their legally valid consent as noted by @Geoffrey Brent. Please consider the consequences. You cannot tell anybody without risking your father finding out, and it could possibly damage your personal relationship with your father.

If your father asks you point-blank and convinces you that he really wants to know about his biological parentage, then you might consider telling him, and strictly in private with nobody else present.

Otherwise keep it to yourself, your father doesn't need to know.

The earlier answer by @Geoffrey Brent is technically absolutely correct. May I only add from the interpersonal aspect (pardon my being so frank, but the situation calls for it) that it would be highly unethical of you to go ahead on your own initiative and break any such unsolicited life-changing information to your father, and probably very hurtful as well.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father.

That is a unilateral and potentially dangerous assumption, which you can validly make only if your father comes to know of your research and explicitly asks you about his biological parentage.

Otherwise,

How can you be sure your father wants to know?

So don't do it. That is the only honest answer I can give you (and in good conscience could not avoid posting, in case you hadn't thought of this aspect) although you asked "how to do it."

Parentage is a very serious and very sensitive matter, and your father will not thank you for giving him this huge psychological shock which can change his life, affect his whole self-image and make him a very unhappy person.

Maybe you feel the need to unburden yourself of this secret? But that is unfortunately what can happen if you go testing your family's DNA, and possibly without their legally valid consent as noted by @Geoffrey Brent. Please consider the consequences. You cannot tell anybody without risking your father finding out, and it could seriously damage your personal relationship with your father.

If your father asks you point-blank and convinces you that he really wants to know about his biological parentage, then you might consider telling him, and strictly in private with nobody else present.

Otherwise keep it to yourself, your father doesn't need to know.

7 added 32 characters in body
source | link

The earlier answer by @Geoffrey Brent is technically absolutely correct. May I only add from the interpersonal aspect that (pardon my being so frank, but the situation calls for it) it would be highly unethical of you to go ahead on your own initiative and break any such life-changing information to your father, and probably very hurtful as well.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father.

That is a unilateral and potentially dangerous assumption, which you can validly make only if your father comes to know of your research and explicitly asks you about his biological parentage.

Otherwise,

How can you be sure your father wants to know?

So don't do it. That is the only honest answer I can give you (and in good conscience could not avoid posting, in case you hadn't thought of this aspect) although you asked "how to do it."

Parentage is a very serious and very sensitive matter, and your father will not thank you for giving him this huge psychological shock which can change his life, affect his whole self-image and make him a very unhappy person. 

Maybe you feel the need to unburden yourself of this secret? But that is unfortunately what can happen if you go testing your family's DNA, and possibly without their legally valid consent as noted by @Geoffrey Brent. Please consider the consequences. You cannot tell anybody without risking your father finding out, and it could possibly damage your personal relationship with your father.

If your father asks you point-blank and convinces you that he really wants to know about his biological parentage, then you might consider telling him, and strictly in private with nobody else present.

Otherwise keep it to yourself, your father doesn't need to know.

The earlier answer by @Geoffrey Brent is technically absolutely correct. May I only add from the interpersonal aspect that (pardon my being so frank, but the situation calls for it) it would be highly unethical of you to go ahead on your own initiative and break any such life-changing information to your father, and probably very hurtful as well.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father.

That is a unilateral and potentially dangerous assumption, which you can validly make only if your father comes to know of your research and explicitly asks you about his biological parentage.

Otherwise,

How can you be sure your father wants to know?

So don't do it. That is the only honest answer I can give you (and in good conscience could not avoid posting, in case you hadn't thought of this aspect) although you asked "how to do it."

Parentage is a very serious and very sensitive matter, and your father will not thank you for giving him this huge psychological shock which can change his life, affect his whole self-image and make him a very unhappy person. Maybe you feel the need to unburden yourself of this secret? But that is unfortunately what can happen if you go testing your family's DNA, and possibly without their legally valid consent as noted by @Geoffrey Brent. Please consider the consequences. You cannot tell anybody without risking your father finding out, and it could possibly damage your personal relationship with your father.

If your father asks you point-blank and convinces you that he really wants to know about his biological parentage, then you might consider telling him, and strictly in private with nobody else present.

Otherwise keep it to yourself, your father doesn't need to know.

The earlier answer by @Geoffrey Brent is technically absolutely correct. May I only add from the interpersonal aspect that (pardon my being so frank, but the situation calls for it) it would be highly unethical of you to go ahead on your own initiative and break any such life-changing information to your father, and probably very hurtful as well.

I believe my father has the right to know that his biological father is not the man he knew as his father.

That is a unilateral and potentially dangerous assumption, which you can validly make only if your father comes to know of your research and explicitly asks you about his biological parentage.

Otherwise,

How can you be sure your father wants to know?

So don't do it. That is the only honest answer I can give you (and in good conscience could not avoid posting, in case you hadn't thought of this aspect) although you asked "how to do it."

Parentage is a very serious and very sensitive matter, and your father will not thank you for giving him this huge psychological shock which can change his life, affect his whole self-image and make him a very unhappy person. 

Maybe you feel the need to unburden yourself of this secret? But that is unfortunately what can happen if you go testing your family's DNA, and possibly without their legally valid consent as noted by @Geoffrey Brent. Please consider the consequences. You cannot tell anybody without risking your father finding out, and it could possibly damage your personal relationship with your father.

If your father asks you point-blank and convinces you that he really wants to know about his biological parentage, then you might consider telling him, and strictly in private with nobody else present.

Otherwise keep it to yourself, your father doesn't need to know.

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