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In India, as you noticed, we "prepone" things, do the "needful", ask "doubts", and ask what's your "good name". But we don't expect westerners to actually use Indianisms.

While it's not offensive per se, I'd consider it unnecessary. Use your own style of English, is what I'd recommend. What would be offensive is if you would "correct" Indians about their words, words that are now well understood or accepted throughout India, although disliked by other speakers of English.

I am, as many here already know, an Indian. I also speak many Indian languages. Cambridge and a few other dictionaries suggest that "do the needful" was originally British but then picked up by Indians.

In India, as you noticed, we "prepone" things, do the "needful", ask "doubts", and ask what's your "good name". But we don't expect westerners to actually use Indianisms.

While it's not offensive per se, I'd consider it unnecessary. Use your own style of English, is what I'd recommend. What would be offensive is if you would "correct" Indians about their words, words that are now well understood or accepted throughout India, although disliked by other speakers of English.

I am, as many here already know, an Indian. I also speak many Indian languages.

In India, as you noticed, we "prepone" things, do the "needful", ask "doubts", and ask what's your "good name". But we don't expect westerners to actually use Indianisms.

While it's not offensive per se, I'd consider it unnecessary. Use your own style of English, is what I'd recommend. What would be offensive is if you would "correct" Indians about their words, words that are now well understood or accepted throughout India, although disliked by other speakers of English.

I am, as many here already know, an Indian. I also speak many Indian languages. Cambridge and a few other dictionaries suggest that "do the needful" was originally British but then picked up by Indians.

2 added 3 characters in body
source | link

In India, as you noticed, we "prepone" things, do the "needful", ask "doubts", and ask what's your "good name". But we don't expect westerners to actually use Indianisms.

While it's not offensive per se, I'd consider it unnecessary. Use your own style of English, is what I'd recommend. What would be offensive is if you would "correct" Indians about their words, words that are now well understood or accepted throughout India, although disliked by other speakers of English.

I am, as many here already know, an Indian. I also speak 5many Indian languages.

In India, as you noticed, we "prepone" things, do the "needful", ask "doubts", and ask what's your "good name". But we don't expect westerners to actually use Indianisms.

While it's not offensive per se, I'd consider it unnecessary. Use your own style of English, is what I'd recommend. What would be offensive is if you would "correct" Indians about their words, words that are now well understood or accepted throughout India, although disliked by other speakers of English.

I am, as many here already know, an Indian. I also speak 5 Indian languages.

In India, as you noticed, we "prepone" things, do the "needful", ask "doubts", and ask what's your "good name". But we don't expect westerners to actually use Indianisms.

While it's not offensive per se, I'd consider it unnecessary. Use your own style of English, is what I'd recommend. What would be offensive is if you would "correct" Indians about their words, words that are now well understood or accepted throughout India, although disliked by other speakers of English.

I am, as many here already know, an Indian. I also speak many Indian languages.

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source | link

In India, as you noticed, we "prepone" things, do the "needful", ask "doubts", and ask what's your "good name". But we don't expect westerners to actually use Indianisms.

While it's not offensive per se, I'd consider it unnecessary. Use your own style of English, is what I'd recommend. What would be offensive is if you would "correct" Indians about their words, words that are now well understood or accepted throughout India, although disliked by other speakers of English.

I am, as many here already know, an Indian. I also speak 5 Indian languages.