2 added 442 characters in body
source | link

Your instincts are absolutely right that you should examine the document carefully. Perhaps everything is above-board, and your step-mother is responding to other stressors when she screams, but there is no way to know this without reading the document carefully, and her behavior has put up several read flags.

Since she is not acting rationally about this, I would not trust her to react calmly to your news. Therefore, I would not tell her. Instead, quietly make an appointment with a lawyer, and simply walk out the door with the document.

If she tries to stop you at the door, then explain to her what you are doing, and that if she wants the documents signed, this will be the fastest way to get it done. Her reaction to this revelation would also be informative. If she is simply stressed about how long everything has taken, or believes that you have been procrastinating, she may begin to usher you out the door. If something more nefarious is going on, she may try to stall you. In either case, take that document to the lawyer and get it looked at.

Of course, this all assumes that you have access to the documents. If you don't have physical access, then you need to secure that first. Tell her that you can have it dealt with within a week (or some other reasonable time-frame; make it fair, but something that you can be held to), but you need a copy of the documents first. There's nothing you can do without a copy. I would emphasize that to her if this becomes a problem.

Your instincts are absolutely right that you should examine the document carefully. Perhaps everything is above-board, and your step-mother is responding to other stressors when she screams, but there is no way to know this without reading the document carefully, and her behavior has put up several read flags.

Since she is not acting rationally about this, I would not trust her to react calmly to your news. Therefore, I would not tell her. Instead, quietly make an appointment with a lawyer, and simply walk out the door with the document.

If she tries to stop you at the door, then explain to her what you are doing, and that if she wants the documents signed, this will be the fastest way to get it done. Her reaction to this revelation would also be informative. If she is simply stressed about how long everything has taken, or believes that you have been procrastinating, she may begin to usher you out the door. If something more nefarious is going on, she may try to stall you. In either case, take that document to the lawyer and get it looked at.

Your instincts are absolutely right that you should examine the document carefully. Perhaps everything is above-board, and your step-mother is responding to other stressors when she screams, but there is no way to know this without reading the document carefully, and her behavior has put up several read flags.

Since she is not acting rationally about this, I would not trust her to react calmly to your news. Therefore, I would not tell her. Instead, quietly make an appointment with a lawyer, and simply walk out the door with the document.

If she tries to stop you at the door, then explain to her what you are doing, and that if she wants the documents signed, this will be the fastest way to get it done. Her reaction to this revelation would also be informative. If she is simply stressed about how long everything has taken, or believes that you have been procrastinating, she may begin to usher you out the door. If something more nefarious is going on, she may try to stall you. In either case, take that document to the lawyer and get it looked at.

Of course, this all assumes that you have access to the documents. If you don't have physical access, then you need to secure that first. Tell her that you can have it dealt with within a week (or some other reasonable time-frame; make it fair, but something that you can be held to), but you need a copy of the documents first. There's nothing you can do without a copy. I would emphasize that to her if this becomes a problem.

1
source | link

Your instincts are absolutely right that you should examine the document carefully. Perhaps everything is above-board, and your step-mother is responding to other stressors when she screams, but there is no way to know this without reading the document carefully, and her behavior has put up several read flags.

Since she is not acting rationally about this, I would not trust her to react calmly to your news. Therefore, I would not tell her. Instead, quietly make an appointment with a lawyer, and simply walk out the door with the document.

If she tries to stop you at the door, then explain to her what you are doing, and that if she wants the documents signed, this will be the fastest way to get it done. Her reaction to this revelation would also be informative. If she is simply stressed about how long everything has taken, or believes that you have been procrastinating, she may begin to usher you out the door. If something more nefarious is going on, she may try to stall you. In either case, take that document to the lawyer and get it looked at.