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So, I've been taught to 'sandwich feedback'. For those that are unfamiliar with the term, it means you start and end with giving compliments, and put the feedback in between those compliments.

For me, this feels very unnatural though and fake though. My gut feeling tells me it's unfairweird to make upgive compliments just so you can say 'this was better done another way'. Also, although the method assumes the compliments given are real, they feel fake to me (both when giving and receiving them). 

A google search for the effectiveness of the feedback sandwich gives me a lot of opinion pieces that share my views, but no links to scientific experiments or research.

Is there any research or scientific proof out there on why and how sandwich feedbacks are more effective than other ways of giving feedback?

So, I've been taught to 'sandwich feedback'. For those that are unfamiliar with the term, it means you start and end with giving compliments, and put the feedback in between those compliments.

For me, this feels very unnatural though and fake though. My gut feeling tells me it's unfair to make up compliments just so you can say 'this was better done another way'. A google search for the effectiveness of the feedback sandwich gives me a lot of opinion pieces that share my views, but no links to scientific experiments or research.

Is there any research or scientific proof out there on why and how sandwich feedbacks are more effective than other ways of giving feedback?

So, I've been taught to 'sandwich feedback'. For those that are unfamiliar with the term, it means you start and end with giving compliments, and put the feedback in between those compliments.

For me, this feels very unnatural though and fake though. My gut feeling tells me it's weird to give compliments just so you can say 'this was better done another way'. Also, although the method assumes the compliments given are real, they feel fake to me (both when giving and receiving them). 

A google search for the effectiveness of the feedback sandwich gives me a lot of opinion pieces that share my views, but no links to scientific experiments or research.

Is there any research or scientific proof out there on why and how sandwich feedbacks are more effective than other ways of giving feedback?

2 added 169 characters in body
source | link

So, I've been taught to 'sandwich feedback'. For those that are unfamiliar with the term, it means you start and end with giving compliments, and put the feedback in between those compliments.

For me, this feels very unnatural though and fake though. My gut feeling tells me it's unfair to make up compliments just so you can say 'this was better done another way'. A google search for the effectiveness of the feedback sandwich gives me a lot of opinion pieces that share my views, but no links to scientific experiments or research.

Is there any research or scientific proof out there on why and how sandwich feedbacks are more effective than other ways of giving feedback?

So, I've been taught to 'sandwich feedback'. For those that are unfamiliar with the term, it means you start and end with giving compliments, and put the feedback in between those compliments.

For me, this feels very unnatural though and fake though. My gut feeling tells me it's unfair to make up compliments just so you can say 'this was better done another way'.

Is there any research or scientific proof out there on why and how sandwich feedbacks are more effective than other ways of giving feedback?

So, I've been taught to 'sandwich feedback'. For those that are unfamiliar with the term, it means you start and end with giving compliments, and put the feedback in between those compliments.

For me, this feels very unnatural though and fake though. My gut feeling tells me it's unfair to make up compliments just so you can say 'this was better done another way'. A google search for the effectiveness of the feedback sandwich gives me a lot of opinion pieces that share my views, but no links to scientific experiments or research.

Is there any research or scientific proof out there on why and how sandwich feedbacks are more effective than other ways of giving feedback?

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Is there any research showing whether sandwich feedbacks are more effective than other forms of feedback?

So, I've been taught to 'sandwich feedback'. For those that are unfamiliar with the term, it means you start and end with giving compliments, and put the feedback in between those compliments.

For me, this feels very unnatural though and fake though. My gut feeling tells me it's unfair to make up compliments just so you can say 'this was better done another way'.

Is there any research or scientific proof out there on why and how sandwich feedbacks are more effective than other ways of giving feedback?