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I am in a biweekly evening class of adults (who are mostly strangers to one another) learning German at beginner level (A1). Our first lesson contrasted with the next four, which were given by a different teacher and were felt to be much more helpful and enjoyable. She was covering for the first teacher, who was sick. After lesson two with our new teacher, one student collected email addresses (though I didn't give mine) and emailed the course director asking the new teacher to take over permanently.

Our old teacher has now returned, is aware that this email was written, and made a pointed comment to the instigator. Naturally things are awkward, and our German lessons are less enjoyable. Given that a change in teacher was never likely, how can I or we help put things back on track?

closed as unclear what you're asking by Tinkeringbell, Alina Cretu, NVZ, Anne Daunted, sphennings Feb 8 '18 at 14:26

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  • This could use some more details: Do you want to talk to the teacher(to apologize?) or your classmates (to organize talking to the teacher)? Are your classmates also willing to do something about this, do they also feel awkward about the whole situation? Since you're not the instigator, how do they feel about it, do they want to do something to fix it? Are you willing to be caught in the middle if you step in between the class and the teacher? – Tinkeringbell Feb 8 '18 at 9:24
  • Who is the organizer and who do you pay and who pays the teacher? I guess in a private school which wants to make money you can try to get your money back because the teacher is not good and the school might put pressure on the teacher. But if this a subsidized school maybe with volunteers this will be a lot more difficult. – user8838 Feb 8 '18 at 10:01
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Unless you decide to drop out of the course entirely it only makes sense to try and improve the atmosphere now. You're trying to improve the class atmosphere and the first step towards that is to start building a personal rapport.

The whole idea is that you should be treating any hard feelings or awkwardness as water under the bridge. Tell the teacher that you're glad he is back in as positive a manner as you can. You're trying to improve the class atmosphere and the first step towards that is to start building a personal rapport.

Tell the teacher that you're glad he is back in as positive a manner as you can. Talk to the teacher alone before or after class, you're friendly and non-threatening. Actually there is a real opportunity here to get the very best out of your teacher, perhaps make the course better than it would have been without incident. You've built a little trust /rapport between the two of you. You shouldn't reference the substitute teacher at all.

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If you are stuck with the teacher maybe you can tell him that the second teacher did this and that (describe what she did differently) and ask him if he can do something similar.

If you are lucky then the original teacher is open to new ideas and he tries to improve his teaching.

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