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About a year ago, I did an informational interview with a friend of a friend. We connected on LinkedIn shortly after, and I did a basic follow-up "thanks for meeting with me" email, but we haven't had any contact since then.

I'm now planning to apply to a position in the same department she worked in when I met her (she has already moved to a different organization), and I'd like to email her to ask if she has any tips for my application or if I can mention to interviewers that I spoke with her to show that I have a bit of knowledge about the position. I'm concerned that she won't recognize my name or remember speaking with me, so I'm considering including a brief reintroduction in the beginning of the email

Hello Dr. Smith, You may remember meeting with me for an informational interview last year as part of one of my doctoral classes at X State University. I'm reaching out today because I noticed an open position at Organization Y and am planning to apply. I was wondering if you had any recommendations..."

But if she does remember meeting with me, will this reintroduction be insulting or awkward?

How can I reintroduce myself in a way that would minimize insulting her?

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    The goals look clear to me. I've edited to make the question in line with site policy – Catija Apr 18 '18 at 17:28
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    What makes you feel that reaching out would be insulting? How would your e-mail be any different from other similar e-mails that this person receives? – baldPrussian Apr 18 '18 at 17:51
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I don't think that your phrasing comes across as insulting. In fact I think your phrasing is pretty good, by saying

"You may remember meeting me..."

you've allowed for each case of they do remember you or they don't. Then you followed up with context to perhaps jog their memory or give context to your past contact, even if you aren't remembered.

I don't think that being more direct and stating the fact

"My name is EmKayDee, we met last year at X for Y..."

would be rude either, this is plainly stating a fact.

I think the only way you could clearly come across as rude in the context of another person's memory of you would be to make an assumption, implied or directly stated, about them, either assuming they remember you:

I'm sure you remember me from X...

or assuming they forgot you:

To jog your memory, we met for X...

Your approach does not assume, nor imply assumption about the other person's memory, so I do not read it as rude. In fact, I read it as polite in that without making such an assumption, it allows for either case.

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How about this:

Hello Dr. Smith,

My name is EmKayDee, we did an informational interview last year as part of one of my doctoral classes at X State University. I'm reaching out today because I noticed an open position at Organization Y and am planning to apply. I was wondering if you had any recommendations..."

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    Hi, welcome to IPS! We generally ask answerers to back up their answers. If you can provide some context in your answer as to why it will solve the problem it would make it a much stronger answer. – Rainbacon Apr 18 '18 at 18:00

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