1

While staying with a group of friends, colleagues or with a single individual, is it okay to have smiling face always during normal conversations or while wishing others such as good morning etc.,

Most of the people who interact won't say anything for and against it. But some frank people ask that why are you feeling shy?.

Actually, I don't feel shy while talking, but it's my habit to keep smiling face when people are around me and while normal conversation.

Is there need to smile less during talk or wish or its okay to continue with a smile?

I am a young male from India.

closed as primarily opinion-based by sphennings, Alina Cretu, OldPadawan, Violet Flare, Imus May 22 '18 at 14:22

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    I think the answer(s) to this question, if there are any that are not purely opinion-based, will benefit from a location tag. Where do you live? Acceptance of smiles varies with countries and cultures, among other factors. – LinuxBlanket May 22 '18 at 13:26
  • I edited accordingly – anon May 22 '18 at 13:29
  • 5
    You're asking about smiling in general, but the response you get from others (asking why you're shy) suggests that you're smiling in lieu of (expected) verbal interaction. This is considerably different than just asking whether it's okay to smile. – Flater May 22 '18 at 13:45
  • 2
    Did you try asking people why do they make this remark? – LinuxBlanket May 22 '18 at 14:18
  • 1
    Like with all things, Smiling just to have a smile can come off unnatural... seem odd... It's better to go with the dynamics of the conversation rather than forcing a smile on your face just to be polite. There is nothing wrong with smiling, but smiling all day can make you seem like an air-head. At least in western/american culture. – ggiaquin16 May 22 '18 at 16:08
3

Smiling naturally and smiling on purpose has some distinct differences. It´s very hard to fake a honest natural smile. Most people will detect the difference, at least subconsciously and to them you will probably feel a bit artificial and unsecure.

So unless you work in customer-service, I´d suggest to forget about smiling and just let your body do what it does naturally.


Disclaimer: I am not proficient in Indian culture, so this may be different locally. My viewpoint comes from western culture as well as general human psychology

  • 1
    Although this might be completely true, an alternative could be that the "shy" remark was made because the other person expected a response and all they got was a (possibly genuine) smile. – Imus May 22 '18 at 14:21
  • @Imus: What makes you think that? OP states nothing that indicates that sort of behavior. I try to keep my answers in the premises of what OP gives as information. – user6109 May 22 '18 at 14:41
  • My comment was meant to show how little we know about the actual situation. Someone told OP that he gives the impression of being shy. We don't know what situation OP was in or what made that person tell that observation. We only know that OP assumed it was because he was putting on a smile all the time. It's impossible to tell if that assumption was right. I did mean it when I said that your answer might be completely true though. All I'm saying is that we can't tell anything meaningful about it with the little information OP gave us about the situation. – Imus May 22 '18 at 14:52
  • @Imus: I can. Always smiling will look strange anyways. OP asked specifically about that. This is very answerable .... – user6109 May 22 '18 at 15:10
  • Note that he did not ask why people though he was shy, he just gave that as tangential information. He asked if always smiling is ok! – user6109 May 22 '18 at 15:11