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Outside of work it seems like some adults have no social life. Can someone tell me where and how adults make friends outside of their work place?

  • Hey there! Welcome to the IPS family. This is quite a broad question, we need to know more about the situation in order to answer it completely, otherwise this is likely to get closed. Could you add some details, maybe explain why one would have troubles socializing outside of work? Do you have an example of struggles to make friends in an environment that is not related to work? Feel free to ask if you need help, and have a great time around! – avazula Jan 24 '19 at 8:14
  • Hi SomeBloke, and welcome to IPS. As interesting as this question can be, it doesn't really fit the requirements of this stack. It seems very broad, and can be opinion-based, because it depends on so many factors, including the personality. That's why I'm voting to close this question, and if this happens, it'll give you more time to edit/improve it. Please take the tour (again?) and read some meta posts about good questions. Thanks. – OldPadawan Jan 24 '19 at 8:16
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    I asked the same question here interpersonal.stackexchange.com/questions/16906/… – pullover123 Jan 24 '19 at 8:30
  • @OldPadawan when I read the question, rather than asking "how do people make friends?", it sounded to me like the OP is not yet an adult, and wants to know how making friends is different for adults compared to children. Would an answer that suggests that making friends as adults is not all that different to making friends as children, be ok? – Aaron F Jan 27 '19 at 13:12
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    @aaron-f : to me, it could be. Or not. As I said, it's very very broad, and neither you nor me would make friends the same way or in the same kind of places. And you may not like my friends too :)) even if you're right/wrong, my original comment stands, I guess. OP really needs to narrow down to something we can answer. – OldPadawan Jan 27 '19 at 15:01
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There's lots of different ways. Johanna has mentioned a few already.

I would suggest additionally that when looking for activities, try and pick something that is reflective of:

  • Your personal interests
  • The kinds of people you want to meet

In regards to the first: Say you enjoy literature and reading. Join a book club. Do you enjoy the great outdoors? Join a bushwalking club (this is a thing in Australia maybe not elsewhere.) Some activities will lend better for this than others. For example you might join a gym. Some gyms have a particular focus on both fitness and fostering a social environment for it's members.

Regarding the second: Different places will lead you to meeting different kinds of people. Have a think about particular acitivities, the general age group that will be taking part, and decide with that in mind.

Extra Note: I would urge you to try a few different things outside your normal habitual hobbies and hobbies not common in your workplace. It will increase the chances of meeting people different to yourself and from outside any of your standard work circles.

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    Answering broad questions is discouraged on IPS, as it leads to broad answers as well. May I ask you to review your answer after OP edits their question to make it less broad? – avazula Jan 24 '19 at 8:42
  • It wasn't flagged as broad when I answered it. But your point still stands so yes I will. – Stringers Jan 24 '19 at 22:18

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