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I am a professional Magento Developer, and I have completed my one year and continue my next one year bond.

When someone offers you a better opportunity with a better salary but you have to continue with your older company than how can I say

"No, I am comfortable with my company and in future when I want to change then I will inform you"

in a better way.

So, How can I politely decline a new job offers?

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    Was this an unsolicited offer, or the result of your application and interviewing? That will make a huge difference in this. Also, What is the one year bond? That may be useful to know for others not of your culture. – baldPrussian Nov 21 '19 at 14:33
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    Why isn't your quoted statement sufficient? To me that's polite enough. Or perhaps replace the "in the future" part with "if anything changes I'll let you know" to soften it further. – Lux Claridge Nov 21 '19 at 14:34
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    @baldPrussian,'one year bond' is kind of an written agreement between employer and employees (in india). As per the agreement either the employee has to work for the agreed tenure OR he has to pay the amount in the agreement. It was there in the companies I worked with. But based on your relationship with management you can leave the company even before the agreed time. I never heard of legal actions (this may not be valid legally as well). But the employer may not support /badmouth about employee when they are answering referral questions from new employer. – NiceGuy Nov 21 '19 at 20:18
  • OP: What is the outcome you're looking for here? What comes after "How can I decline a job offer, such that..."? – Dancrumb Dec 1 '19 at 17:04
  • I understand you have some kind of a bounding contract so why not mention this? I mean you're not exactly "comfortable" with your current company (or maybe you are but that's not what you express in your question), you're bound to it. – Laurent S. Dec 5 '19 at 9:50
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It's not 100% clear what your desired outcome is, but I can hazard some guesses.

1) If you're hoping that the specific position you were offered will be available in the future, then you need to lose that hope. Companies strive to fill positions as quickly as possible.

2) If you're hoping to work at the company in the future, then you're very close. The main difference is to avoid putting the onus on yourself to make contact in the future.

Thank you so much for your offer. I'm not looking to leave my current role right now, but would love to hear about future opportunities as they arise.

You show gratitude; you show that your "no" is about your current situation and not about their offer; you leave the door open for future opportunities; you leave it with them to re-initiate contact.

I believe this probably addresses your desired outcome of saying "No" without burning bridges.

I've been a hiring manager for the past 5 years and have been the recipient of communication from 100s of candidates. Good hiring managers understand the realities of the workplace and don't take polite rejections personally. On the contrary, a little courtesy will have at worst no impact on them and, more likely, a slightly positive impact that may pay off down the line.

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