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I recently moved to a new section, and my new boss (actually, my boss's boss) has repeatedly mispronounced my last name. It isn't a tricky name, and the mispronunciation is obvious (soft 'o' instead of an 'a'. The mispronunciation is a more common name though. Think like, 'Brock' v 'Brack' or something. So I get some misunderstanding). But I have a name plate by my cubicle so I feel it shouldn't be that hard. But I don't often interact with him individually and I don't want to bring it up when he's introducing me or in front of others (I guess since I already didn't say anything it's made it worse). The relationship is fairly formal in our office.

How can I do this in a way that works well for everyone?

Edit: I should add that this isn't a cultural/language issue, we're both native English-speakers with European-sounding names.

  • how long you worked in the new section for? (this could help determine the appropriate approach you might want to take) – Bradley Wilson Sep 14 '17 at 1:30
  • Your boss's personality would seem to matter. A lot of folks wouldn't take any offense at all, and maybe even laugh at their mistake; but if they're the really sensitive type, then that could warrant special consideration (as would most interactions with them). Are you concerned that they might be on the sensitive side? – Nat Sep 14 '17 at 14:06
  • @Bradley Wilson officially just a week but I was introduced a about a month or so ago. – Wolfgang Sep 14 '17 at 19:18
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Standing up for yourself is rarely a bad idea. The only mistake you've made is not doing it sooner.

People seem to forget that the boss is still a person. Being a person they're fallible. They make mistakes. It's only truly terrible people that can't handle being corrected over something as minor as a mispronunciation.

Good bosses on the other hand tend to respect people who aren't too afraid of them.

If you're worried about embarrassing the boss, say something in private. But, a good boss wouldn't mind being corrected in front of others. Respect is a two way street after all. Ask yourself if you really want to work for someone who can't be asked to say your name correctly...

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    This seems like the best answer, but I would add that only in a perfect world would we all have good bosses, and generally we can only choose the organizations we work for, and not the individuals. – Wolfgang Sep 18 '17 at 21:39
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It isnt a tricky name, and the mispronunciation is obvious (soft 'o' instead of an 'a'.

What's obvious for one person isn't necessarily obvious to another. Martin Bashir consistently referred to the previous president of the United States as Bearack Obamer. Many Asian people can't tell the difference between "ride" and "lied". There may be dialect issues here. If "rock" is pronounced like "rack" in someone's native dialect, they may find it difficult to not pronounce "Brock" as "Brack".

But I don't often interact with him individually and I don't want to bring it up when he's introducing me

See whether you can arrange it so you're introducing yourself.

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