I'm 17 years old and live in Austria. I currently attend the 4th grade at my "Highschool". Since I was 4 years old, I have problems with depression and other mental illness-stuff. In my second year I talked to a guidance counselor/teacher of my school and I was hospitalised in a psychiatric care, where I had to stay for 4 months (which is above average, I think).

Another student of my class, also spent a few weeks in a psychiatric care. After my discharge, the problems got worse, new problems came and until now, no therapist could help me. I tried to talk to my teacher again but he always says that he thinks I'm fine now and much more stable than the other student (who has to go to the psychiatric care very often).

How do I "convince" my teacher, that I'm absolutely not fine and not feeling any better and think I would be better back in treatment. He says I'm feeling better because I think about going to university now, which I didn't do two years ago. Back then, I was only in 2nd grade with 3 more years to come, so in my opinion too early to think about university or work after school.

closed as off-topic by anongoodnurse, Monica Cellio, apaul, Notts90, Anne Daunted Dec 8 '17 at 6:11

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about interpersonal skills, within the scope defined in the help center." – anongoodnurse, Notts90, Anne Daunted
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    Why do you need a teacher's assistance with getting mental health care? Are they your legal guardian? – apaul Dec 7 '17 at 23:12
  • 4
    I removed the part about getting sent back to involuntary confinement because that's not really something we can help you with. If you need mental health care, we can not assist you in finding that or in convincing your teacher that you need it. If that is your primary goal, then we will have to close this question and recommend that you reach out to the mental health services in Austria for assistance. Other than getting your teacher to have you sent to involuntary commitment, is there another - for example, school-related - reason that you need to convince him? – Catija Dec 7 '17 at 23:21
  • I think you need to focus on getting help with your mental health from a therapist rather than your teacher so I think this question should be closed as off topic. That said, I hope you succeed as mental health issues are not pleasant and I wish you all the best. – Notts90 Dec 8 '17 at 4:40

In most countries, the diagnosis of health-issues is performed by health professionals like general physicians, psychiatrists and psychologists. They are also in charge of providing proper treatment or give directions on how to get proper treatment.

I am sure that this is the case in Austria, too.

It is simply not within the scope of a teacher’s skills to assess a health condition, or if you are “over it” or not. The teacher’s assessment of being “over it” is to be seen as a personal opinion of that person, even if it is expressed as an emanation of eternal truth.

I would also advise to not compare your situation to another pupil’s situation, as people, their health issues and healing processes tend to be highly individual. Being in hospital for 4 months compared to 6 months has no real meaning beyond a mathematical difference of 2 months.

Take into consideration that information about health issues is a vital part of privacy and therefore protected by strong legislation in the EU. Sharing confidential information without consent is probably illegal, but certainly unethical.

If it is necessary to prove that your mental health condition is preventing you from attending classes, perform exams etc., you might want to see an expert and get 1. a proper certificate for your school and 2. proper treatment.

Keep in mind that unless they're fairly new to teaching, the teacher probably has a fair amount of experience dealing with melodramatic teenagers, and they're almost certainly comparing whatever symptoms you're displaying to those that have been displayed by other students that they've dealt with before to make that analysis.

Also, keep in mind that as a teenager, your brain has not yet finished fully developing, and you're lacking in the life experience possessed by most adults; it's entirely possible that the things you're going through now are things that most people go through as they grow up.

If you're really concerned, though, go see a licensed psychiatrist about your mental issues to get them checked out to see whether or not you actually do have issues that you need to be concerned about.

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