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30

Just be proud of the fact you're putting in the effort to try and improve your accent. If anything it'll be a great way for you to know when you've successfully gotten rid of your accent. Having been in the same situation as you in a country where no one spoke my mother-tongue. When anyone thought to laugh I let them. I sometimes do the same when I hear ...


21

I just want to raise a perspective that wasn't necessarily brought up by Edlothiad. For many of these kids, hearing someone with an accent in their language is very different. They may be looking at the pronunciation of your words, your grammar and so on. They're not doing it to be mean, it's because they genuinely think that it's funny. Behaviours like ...


12

Kids laugh at almost anything they find unusual. Your accent is just that. Unusual. Perhaps like the others said, it'll be an indication for you that you've improved your accent when they stop laughing. Take it as a positive thing. It's not like they're bullying you for this. I've seen people laugh at Indians' accents when they speak English. But it's not ...


8

There is nothing wrong with being interested in various local dialects & accents. It can be fun to learn them & use it for impersonation, etc, but I do not think most people take to it kindly outside of acting or just learning it in good fun. My grandfather & grandmother had strong accents, to the point of speaking broken English. When people ...


6

In Switzerland,we have the same thing with different dialects of swiss german. Everyone laughs about everyone (especially about the guys from zurich and st. gallen). As I moved to a different region, I had to hear a lot of silly comments about my dialect too. On the other hand, I myself laugh and crack jokes about other swiss dialects. It's just something ...


5

I have the exact same issue, My hearing is actually good, I can hear a phone ringing over a loud television etc. and will often be telling my GF her phone is ringing when she can not here it. However, I am constantly saying 'What?!?' to my GF, and then before she repeats what she is saying it will click, and I can respond. My solution to this in my work ...


4

I was mocked for having an English accent when I first moved to Canada. I was younger than you are, and it was really upsetting. I can't control how I speak! In my case I lost the accent very quickly as a form of self preservation. I don't recommend mocking them back. If nothing else, it shows you thinking mocking how people talk is a fine thing to do. What'...


4

Background: I live in the northeast U.S., I assume I am about the same age range, and I am deaf, with cochlear implants. I often speak for myself, but struggle to understand what others say. I've been in many similar situations where I ask them to repeat what they say, repeatedly (This sometimes embarrasses me and annoys others). I believe I also have an ...


2

Laughter isn't [necessarily] bad. This varies by culture, by context and by individual, and it's very easy to assume that non-verbal communication (as well as paralanguage) mean the same for others as it does for you. Ideally you can train yourself to first assume the best and maybe even laugh with them, or back at them. Another option is to engage a few "...


2

Work on your speech but realize that you will always have an accent. Since you're young, the better chances you will speak more like those around you the more you talk to them. So don't respond by speaking to them less or your accent won't improve as much. Every region has a different accent, especially here in the U.S. and in the Southern U.S. where I'm ...


2

Your case might be somewhat uncommon, but I think a more common case to be considered is when people specifically try to hide their original accent/dialect in order to 'fit in' more with the people they're speaking to. In a lot of cases, this is seen as duplicitous; if you're trying to hide how you really talk, then what else are you hiding about yourself? ...


2

Unless you develop an accent automatically, I don't think it's appropriate. People will assume you are just "having fun with accents" or something. I grew up in the Middle East mostly, moving from city to city, and visited my home country India often for vacation. And therefore, I've been to several different schools and colleges, and exposed to ...


1

Make a joke, so instead of them laughing at you, they're laughing with you. You can say something satirical to make light of the situation, such as: Contrary to what you might believe, people in the UK actually speak pretty good English. As of course you (and hopefully they) know, England is where English comes from, so the British naturally assume theirs ...


1

I'm a little torn here... On the one hand you are free to speak however you damn well please. On the other hand, you will annoy a number of people by affecting an accent that you didn't come by the "usual way". Hardly fair, but true. Tangentially relevant story... I've lived in different parts of the US and Spain, so my English and Spanish, while usually ...


1

Why do you need to do this? People who do have this accent will just think you are making fun of them. What's wrong with the accent you grew up with? It's perfectly fine and nothing to be ashamed of. If you really want to adopt the accent then move there and it will come on its own. If you are interested in your ancestors you can do the family tree stuff, ...


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