116

I suggest you "own" it and if need be, tell a mild joke about it first. I know someone whose initials are STL and who worked on the C++ Standard Library (which for historical reasons we all call STL) team at Microsoft. Nobody was confused by that, and many people called him STL deliberately to draw attention to the name thing. So you can say "Hi, I'm ...


10

I met a man once here in Hungary, whose family name was similar to the PM's (the prime minister wrote his slightly differently, also a rare name). He introduced himself like this: -Hi, I'm X.Y., and the PM is my uncle. (short pause) Ok, just kidding. My name is written like this and that. And he went on with whatever he wanted to say. He obviously ...


6

One conflict-avoidant option is to shift the focus away from yourself: Yeah, my customers have mentioned it - they can hear it when I'm trying to talk to them on the phone, it makes conversations difficult. This might get your co-worker to turn the music down, but it also risks an outcome where they only address the stated issues and not the ones that ...


5

Not exactly the same, but I have a really common first name in my country, so at most workplaces I've been, there's been several other with the same first name. We usually solved it by going by our last names instead, thus easily distinguishing between us. Some chose to go by initials. So that would be my recommendation: Go by your surname or initials, at ...


2

I agree completely with Geoffrey's answer, but I would just like to emphasise that most likely for your office, complaining to HR was a far worse violation of common curtesy than loud music playing. Quite ironic :) I work in a very small office with no HR at all, but I have worked in other mid sized offices and it was the same there too. Basically, when you ...


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