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39

Maybe it's just me, but in the UK I would not understand any of that. It's completely alien to me. If you work in an international setting, it might be better to use full words and sentences to express your thoughts.


24

I recognized the gesture immediately from the title: Some call it “finger twiddling”; it's a self-touching fidgeting behavior and I've seen variations of it IRL (eg joining the palms and tapping the tips of the indexes). It's meant to convey apprehension. Still, I'm not sure I'd recognize 👉👈 in a chat. I think the 😬 alone does that, and I've used it ...


22

The reason such answers come off as "offensive" is that they're confrontational - you're challenging the other person's interest in the topic, which implies that you don't think they should be interested in it. So try not to do that. Instead, accept it as a given that the other person is interested in the topic they've brought up and ask questions which ...


14

I'm a socially awkward person who often doesn't care to participate in the small talk of those people around me. On the other hand, if it's someone with whom I'm comfortable with, then I'll be the one spurting these random facts. (I read a lot, and surf the internet, so I'll often just spout the latest thing I was looking into.) If someone has just told me ...


13

Disclaimer: I never used or saw such usage of that emoji, therefore my answer focuses on its IRL understanding and offers an emoji alternative that may be better understood in an international context. I do use this gesture when I want to express my discomfort asking for help or because I did something wrong. I don't know if it's a gesture that'd be ...


9

TL;DR: Reach out to them and explain that you need to work things out with them beforehand. Note: I'm assuming a Modern Orthodox level of Judaism. This is based on my own experience, as a Modern Orthodox Jew. How do I communicate to my jewish friends that we are already aware of some rules regarding their religious obligations, have made some ...


9

I've lived in China for years. TL;DR: This is not necessarily a date. It's good to attempt to pay for the bill (if given a chance), but I expect it's unlikely you'll succeed. First of all, in Chinese/Taiwanese culture, would this be considered a date? I'm not familiar with Taiwanese culture, but I expect it is very similar to China. In Chinese ...


8

Ok, so what it looks like is that your challenge is managing expectations from both yourself and the girl regarding dating and relationship progressing. Cultural-wise, the western society is much less "strict" on relationships and more often than not there is no expectation on the step-by-step of a budding romance. And some of the terms and definitions are ...


7

I want to tell her that, since I am a PostDoc researcher I perfectly unterstand the need to sometimes vanish from all other personal connections and just focus on research. I want to tell her that I want to try to support her with this decision and are really happy for her. But at the same time I want her to give us a chance to at least try and see if we can ...


6

In the case of a non-native English speaker using an incorrect word that is not particularly close to the intended word (whether I understood the intended meaning or not), I typically ask something like: Did you mean [x] when you wrote [y]? or, if I'm a bit closer with the person to whom I'm speaking, something like: That word seems a bit odd to me ...


6

Hmm, in the US, the usual form of a non-verbal "Sorry, that was my fault" signal is a kind of tapping your chest with either the index finger or palm. This is more or less a generic "me" gesture though, and would depend on context to get the "my fault" part across. The circumstances that I've seen a "pointing two index fingers" together gesture are usually ...


5

On top of the very nice answer arielCo provided, general recommendation (from first-hand experience working with 6 different nationalities on a daily basis) is that you always use full sentences to convey what you want and be careful with gestures. Lots of gestures can have very different meanings depending on the country and you can do a lot of damage ...


5

Learning a culture is like learning a language. At first, you know nothing about it. Every attempt sounds weird (to you and to them). At this point, consider what their options are: to correct you, to treat it as something fun, or to admonish you, or even to treat you with derision. It sounds like they are treating your learning journey as something fun. If ...


5

When I'm with someone, I love to give "random facts" to keep the conversation going/steer the conversation toward a topic I like. When I do that, what I like is when the other person responds by another fact they know about this specific topic (and the more close to the original topic, the better). So, in your case, the answer could be about actor X, ...


4

The chances are extremely high that your date knows more about Western culture than you know about hers. Western culture is omnipresent - the whole world watches Hollywood movies. She will know that you, as a European, have asked her out on a date. In any culture, consulting a "guide" to etiquette will give you only generalisations which may be true for a ...


3

In the US, I would understand the idea - and I don't want to be rude - but it would strike me as comically awkward. It reminds me of someone writing a stutter into their words to show how awkward they feel. Perhaps it's a cultural difference, or just comes across poorly in translation, but I would find even your first message overly deferential. Combining ...


3

I'm not sure if this problem is actually this simple Well, you described it in just a few words, therefore the problem is simple. However, the solution will require you to make some mental effort, and have some patience. I was in a very similar situation (I described it in some other answer) and I tell you exactly what I did. The most important thing is ...


3

Often, when people choose topics for small talk, it's because they're interested in at least some aspect of that thing. Combine that with the fact that people generally like to talk about things they're interested in, especially with those they care about, and I've found a useful way to respond to these situations is to ask a question back that allows the ...


2

Like you, I also have difficulty with these things. It is sometimes quite agonizing to write these endorsements. I have some thought that may help you in finding the answer. I am in the Western United States and our culture is probably different. You can decide if these are adequate, or need some adjustments for the 2 cultures (Europe vs. India). Recognize ...


2

Chinese instant messenger apps WeChat and QQ (both made by the company Tencent) have their own standard emoji set which feature a few emojis which I have never seen elsewhere. One of them is this one, which I think resembles the gesture you describe: Since virtually everyone in China uses one of these apps (or both), I would expect most people in China to ...


1

I have gamed/worked with people from all over the world. I don't remember ever coming across that emoji. Although I probably have seen it, I can tell you is not common and not everyone will understand it. If you want an answer from a global comunity point of view, the answer is: No, is not common across many countries/cultures. Very few emojis are ...


1

This is a Japanese gesture, and has infiltrated other countries due to globalization. arielCo identified this gesture as a "finger twiddle". A quick google image search of the term reveals an overwhelming abundance of anime images (ignoring the Simpsons images and references that incorrectly associate Mr. Burns' finger steeple with twiddling). Anyone who ...


1

You say that she's stopped responding to requests to talk about this. Have you actually talked about it, or just made requests to talk about it? I've found at multiple times in my life it's necessary to just send your message, as best as you can, and let it be. If she's already heard your message, and you just want to talk more about it because she hasn't ...


1

If someone repeatedly spells a word incorrectly in a short span of time, that's usually a pretty good clue to saying that they're misspelling it because of a lack of knowledge rather than a typo or mistake. I'm a fairly blunt person, so my method is rather simple and upfront. I've had exclusively neutral or positive responses from people, unless they have ...


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