17

Should you be? It seems pretty obvious that, if you can avoid anger or offense, it's better for everyone. Typically, though, we don't get a choice about whether to be offended. Now, if you get offended, you can borrow this move. I would love to say that I did this, but unfortunately, I was the one who had badly mimicked an accent here. The other fellow ...


8

There is nothing wrong with being interested in various local dialects & accents. It can be fun to learn them & use it for impersonation, etc, but I do not think most people take to it kindly outside of acting or just learning it in good fun. My grandfather & grandmother had strong accents, to the point of speaking broken English. When people ...


6

As Imus has answered earlier, the (modern) expected dresscode for anyone is usually a yukata for summer festivals. This isn't always the case, especially for females, where yukatas can be considered stuffy or a trouble to put on. As an example that this is the general view, here's a small comparison on preferences that was trending a few years back, on the ...


5

I get a lot of this. I have different ways of dealing with it - depends who's talking: Colleagues - ha, ha, we can speak English instead if you like. Strangers - yupp, been here 30 years and still can't talk properly. Then they say, but you speak really well! Mates - vot are you sinking about? Teenage children of mates - I have to warn you, I have this ...


5

Congratulations on learning English. My sister in law is Korean so maybe I can help you. You can say things like that, BUT if your English is not good, it can sound stiff and awkward. In addition to that, unless you know the person well enough it can seem intrusive. You also need to pay attention to your tone of voice and facial expression. Do you appear ...


4

In India, as you noticed, we "prepone" things, do the "needful", ask "doubts", and ask what's your "good name". But we don't expect westerners to actually use Indianisms. While it's not offensive per se, I'd consider it unnecessary. Use your own style of English, is what I'd recommend. What would be offensive is if you would "correct" Indians about their ...


2

Starting from the culturally expected dresscode at these kind of events wearing a yukata is the most "normal" thing to do. Just like wearing a black (or really dark) suit to a funeral or a tuxedo to a wedding would be the expected dress code. If a foreigner shows up with the "culturally correct" clothes it's most likely percieved as appreciation for the ...


2

Your case might be somewhat uncommon, but I think a more common case to be considered is when people specifically try to hide their original accent/dialect in order to 'fit in' more with the people they're speaking to. In a lot of cases, this is seen as duplicitous; if you're trying to hide how you really talk, then what else are you hiding about yourself? ...


2

Unless you develop an accent automatically, I don't think it's appropriate. People will assume you are just "having fun with accents" or something. I grew up in the Middle East mostly, moving from city to city, and visited my home country India often for vacation. And therefore, I've been to several different schools and colleges, and exposed to ...


1

Why do you need to do this? People who do have this accent will just think you are making fun of them. What's wrong with the accent you grew up with? It's perfectly fine and nothing to be ashamed of. If you really want to adopt the accent then move there and it will come on its own. If you are interested in your ancestors you can do the family tree stuff, ...


1

I'm a little torn here... On the one hand you are free to speak however you damn well please. On the other hand, you will annoy a number of people by affecting an accent that you didn't come by the "usual way". Hardly fair, but true. Tangentially relevant story... I've lived in different parts of the US and Spain, so my English and Spanish, while usually ...


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