121

Finding out if you are in a bar where this is the norm or exception can go a long way in making sure you are not needlessly putting yourself in this kind of situation. Per the comments, you can ask the bartender "is it always this loud in here?" and this will give you a hint whether to expect this rowdy behavior frequently. It's very possible that the ...


30

I will answer your question the same way I would answer a girl asking "What is a good/polite way to separate nice guys who want to seriously date me from enthusiastic drunks hitting on me when I go to the bar by myself?" My answer is: "If you want to find a nice guy who wants to seriously date you, then don't go to a bar by yourself." When people go to ...


20

I know it may seem a herculean task, but you need to swallow the irritation. If you confront them while you're thinking the way you've written this post, it will show through. I can tell you from dealing with a younger brother that you need to master yourself before you can master the situation around you. If they're being truly loud and obnoxious, some ...


19

If you get into an altercation with someone who's drunk, simply running away is always a possibility. Drunk people can't run fast, so they won't be able to catch you. Discretion is the better part of valour.


15

Physical violence is never a good solution. If it's justifiable, it will be because you needed to defend yourself and nothing more. With a drunk, that may be as simple as grabbing him by his shoulders and making him sit down -- on a chair or on the ground without injuring him. Then simply leave right away, or put yourself in a position where others can ...


14

In a bar, when you're on your own, you might sometimes attract lonely people who want to socialize, and spend time having fun one way or another. They may spot you as one of them. You actually found an efficient and easy way out: "I'm just practicing". If you really want to take a chance and find someone to play with, at roughly the same skill level, you'll ...


14

It's a gamble to ask anyone in a bar to quiet down if they're already being loud and rowdy. Before you approach anyone, consider if they are being enough of a distraction that you would leave the bar if they don't quiet down. I say this because there's always a chance (with any IPS problem involving someone who is drinking) that your communication will ...


14

You don't. Bars are noisy places by definition. Alcohol makes people talk louder. (and make them think they're witty, handsome, brilliant, and other fallacies) That's why people go to bars, to unwind a bit and get away from structure. Part of playing darts in a bar is blocking out the loud noises, and even balancing when you get jostled by the occasional ...


9

Unless you are the bouncer or bartender or some other employee, you don't. You either talk to an employee, asking them to do something about it or you let it be, leaving if it disturbs you sufficiently. This isn't limited to dealing with loud drunks. You don't tell other adults what to do. You complain to someone that has the authority to tell them what ...


8

To identify experienced dart players, inform anyone who wants to play that you're in the middle of a game of 301. Ask them if they'd mind keeping score until you finish. You can instantly rule out anyone who doesn't know what you're talking about and anyone who doesn't know how the game is scored. You might be able to make distinctions among those who offer ...


7

Bumping into someone who is drunk should probably be handled the same way as bumping into anyone. A simple apology and move on. If the person gets hostile, or belligerent, a joke can often defuse things. Drunk people, like most people, like to laugh. Something like: "Oh, sorry man. Just trying to get to the bar/pub before they run dry." This sort of ...


4

Is there a way to get guys in this sort of situation to chill out, without being aggressively confrontational? A friendly statement can go a long way in solving this issue. "Hey, could you guys keep it down a bit? It's a bit distracting." From my experience on the "party floor" of my residence in university, sometimes the people get so caught up in ...


4

Get the person all the way to the hospital (or into EMT's hand) and give as much information as possible to the professionals trying to save their life. Since this isn't about how to do that, but about the people involved, my answer will focus on that. Ignoring them may not be the strategy that gets the person in trouble the medical attention they need as ...


3

First of all, you both collide because you both have willing diminished your ability to perceive the reality. He because of alcohol abuse* and you because of phone abuse. Facit, you both have the same** right to complaint. You should apologize how stupid of you it was and run away. Blaming the other party leads to escalation even if both are sober. ...


3

In a friendly and we're-all-buddies tone, immediately after they yell, yell back (slightly less loud) "Gentlemen. How can anyone think around here with you guys making such a loud ruckus." Laugh a little. Smile. Spread your hands out wide, open palms facing up slightly like a mild question, body facing them, unafraid, unstressed. Make sure your tone falls at ...


2

Is drunkeness really the issue? As with one of the other answers, my main experience is with pool (with an occasional game of darts). In my experience, pool and darts go hand in hand with a few drinks, with some even saying it makes them play better. If it is more about skill level (and your first tactic hasn't worked), perhaps hand over the darts and let ...


2

Like others mentioned, running away is an option considering that the drunk person won't run so well. It just so happens that the onlooking Indians are very good at chasing people, to deliver to them mob justice, assuming the person is robbing the drunk or something. So I'd not recommend running away just like that. Maybe a quick "sorry" will ease things. ...


2

I'd just say, "I'm sorry. I'm sorry. I'm really, really sorry, but I have to go" Hopefully repeating sorry enough times will get through to them. My experience with drunk people has been that sometimes they don't process what you say the first time. Telling them that you have to go is generally considered more polite than leaving without saying anything as ...


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