36

Maybe it's just me, but in the UK I would not understand any of that. It's completely alien to me. If you work in an international setting, it might be better to use full words and sentences to express your thoughts.


24

I recognized the gesture immediately from the title: Some call it “finger twiddling”; it's a self-touching fidgeting behavior and I've seen variations of it IRL (eg joining the palms and tapping the tips of the indexes). It's meant to convey apprehension. Still, I'm not sure I'd recognize 👉👈 in a chat. I think the 😬 alone does that, and I've used it ...


13

Disclaimer: I never used or saw such usage of that emoji, therefore my answer focuses on its IRL understanding and offers an emoji alternative that may be better understood in an international context. I do use this gesture when I want to express my discomfort asking for help or because I did something wrong. I don't know if it's a gesture that'd be ...


8

Honesty is the best policy here. He's only going to feel like you're "blowing him off" if your refusals are without reason. If you think more offers are forthcoming, your next response should be something like: Yes! Or, if you can't, then: I'm sorry I keep turning down your invites, I really want to hang out but weekends are usually difficult for me. ...


7

I feel I've had quite extensive experience of going to concerts and festivals. My first was 1992, my most recent was 2018, and that includes large festivals, medium-sized venues that hold a few thousand, and smaller, more intimate venues of perhaps 200 capacity. In my experience, I've observed that people go to concerts with different goals and expectations....


6

I too have struggled with this, so I'll share a few things that I do to help ease the awkwardness. Oftentimes when two people approach a door at the same time, one will open it for the other. Body Language If one person is holding the door for the other, the body language is very simple to read. When I am holding a door open (and I've noticed the same of ...


5

Hmm, in the US, the usual form of a non-verbal "Sorry, that was my fault" signal is a kind of tapping your chest with either the index finger or palm. This is more or less a generic "me" gesture though, and would depend on context to get the "my fault" part across. The circumstances that I've seen a "pointing two index fingers" together gesture are usually ...


3

In the US, I would understand the idea - and I don't want to be rude - but it would strike me as comically awkward. It reminds me of someone writing a stutter into their words to show how awkward they feel. Perhaps it's a cultural difference, or just comes across poorly in translation, but I would find even your first message overly deferential. Combining ...


3

On top of the very nice answer arielCo provided, general recommendation (from first-hand experience working with 6 different nationalities on a daily basis) is that you always use full sentences to convey what you want and be careful with gestures. Lots of gestures can have very different meanings depending on the country and you can do a lot of damage ...


2

Chinese instant messenger apps WeChat and QQ (both made by the company Tencent) have their own standard emoji set which feature a few emojis which I have never seen elsewhere. One of them is this one, which I think resembles the gesture you describe: Since virtually everyone in China uses one of these apps (or both), I would expect most people in China to ...


2

I am an Indian female and I have encountered such situations from my other Indian colleagues as well. Most of them assume that it is bad manners to shoot a question directly and hence get into such greetings. I have even had colleagues initiating the conversations by asking me how my weekend was or how I am these days or the kind of tasks that I am working ...


2

I have some experience with concerts (mostly heavy-metal ones, but pretty sure it's the same for any genre). Well, you are quite wrong in your statement. Please consider the following types of concerts, and their (basic) characteristics: heavy-metal concerts rules of etiquette kept at a minimum; people unleash their (full?) internal potential and energies;...


1

OP, please clarify your location. However, if you are talking about the USA or Germany, unfortunately it is. I would say it is common behavior when seating is not assigned. I’ve experienced this at various events, and so have my friends. This has happened at concerts and New Years festivities, both indoor and outdoor. It is also generally frowned upon, but ...


1

This is a Japanese gesture, and has infiltrated other countries due to globalization. arielCo identified this gesture as a "finger twiddle". A quick google image search of the term reveals an overwhelming abundance of anime images (ignoring the Simpsons images and references that incorrectly associate Mr. Burns' finger steeple with twiddling). Anyone who ...


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