68

I have had a similar problem in the past. Your landlord is disregarding your privacy as well as your rights as a tenant. They know that what they are doing is illegal, and still, they do it. They may own the building, but when they lease it, they forego rights to occupy the space without your consent (barring extreme cases). That being said, I feel ...


41

It is a dilemma. You're worried that if you speak against your existing landlord, any potential new landlord might think you are the problem; perhaps that your standards are impossible, and that you might cause them grief. If you don't tell the truth though, there is something potentially worse than your new landlord suspecting you are lying. If you act ...


26

You mention that this guy isn't actually the sole landlord. In this situation I recommend that you "talk to the organ grinder, not the monkey"; that is speak to the person that is really in charge, not just their representative. So if he just works for them then you need to find somebody higher. Speak to, or write to someone senior in the company and state: ...


18

Time for a small frame challenge. The problem as I understand it is that the boy doesn't realise that the 2 doorbells means you're just neighbours sharing the same front door. From my experience with my nieces, nephews and neighbours kids I can tell you the best time to teach a new concept is in the moment they're stuck on it. In this case, when nobody ...


13

A while back I wanted air conditioning in a townhouse I rented. I got a price on it of 2,200.00USD for central air conditioning, which was low at the time. I talked it over with the landlord, and he agreed to have it installed. But he said I would have to sign a new one-year lease with a 25.00USD/month rent increase, which was small in comparison to the ...


12

In the situation you describe, you can't. You want your landlord to do A (stop the dog from barking), and she refuses to do A. You have options-- if you don't like where you are living, you can leave (even if that involves breaking a lease). But instead of that you have decided to stay where you are and also unilaterally lower your own rent (that's the ...


12

I'll leave aside the landlord-tenant relationship and landlord's obligation and focus on the question itself. I'd gather information. What are the rest of the flats in the area like? How would it benefit the landlord to install AC? It goes without saying that AC would benefit you and that you want it, but (quite frankly) that's not the landlord's concern....


9

As she is obviously not doing this to embarrass you or nag you in any way, I think she's probably doing this as a "friendly reminder", and as such, sees it as a favor she does you. The best course of action would be to let it slip. However if it really bothers you, I recommand being extremely careful on how you word this. She'd be surprised by an out-of-the-...


7

In my written agreement with the leaseholder, it only mentions my room's rent That answers your question. You don't pay the extra rent for the extra room. When asked why you respond with: My agreement only pertains to the room I'm renting. I think it's unfortunate that the room is empty and I'm trying to help by showing it. When the primary lease holder ...


6

I know you said to leave the legal aspect aside, but if you are approaching someone to speak about a matter that may have a legal angle you really should know the facts first. Even if you aren't going to "get legal" in your approach, knowing your position will give you confidence in what you say. Also you never know where the other party will steer the ...


6

Every month she keeps reminding me that tomorrow is the rent day, which really bothers me as I always paid on time for the last four month. Old people tend to repeat things and follow established patterns. If she's been reminding every tenant for the last 20 years, she isn't going to stop now... You can try this though: "I setup a reminder in my phone ...


6

I'm pretty sure that if you had issues with your landlord, that means there were underlying issues beyond their cooperation. If everything goes well, you really don't need to talk much to your landlord, so if you find them uncooperative, that means you needed something fixed which didn't. So if they ask, talk about those rather than the landlord. There were ...


5

Be sincere but remorseful. Hand it in person. Say something like "I know this isn't favorable but I really, really need your dog to stop barking. I'd hate to be a butt but I need you to do something about it, and I'm this serious about it (hence the legal notice)." Really emphasize that it's between her dog barking and you being functional at your job, and ...


5

I don't think your suggested statement will address your concerns. Your landlord could be justified in knocking on your day late at night in some cases, such as if you're being very noisy. Even if your lease doesn't prohibit noise, there's probably a local ordinance which does. So telling your landlord "don't knock on my door after 8" will have to ...


4

I would like to be sincere and [...] express that I really need the landlord to be reasonable and for us to have a nice cooperation. So, be sincere :) Tell them. But not in a negative way, talking about the past. Be positive when you address them with your concerns. Talk about the future and what you expect. When visiting, talking to them, about the rent ...


4

You have two goals, which can be pursued at the same time: getting the landlord to fulfill a legal obligation, and getting the landlord to suit your personal preferences. On both items I think you will be well-served by presenting these as reasonable requests, which it would only be reasonable for your landlord to satisfy. The key to the former is going to ...


4

I've dealt with many types of landlords in my time. In addition, I am going through a divorce which requires much back and forth over legal issues. In legal matters, it's always best to be direct and polite. Limit your requests to that which you want, rather than tactical or strategic requests that you don't want. A contract represents a meeting of minds ...


4

Having had several landlords in my life, and you already saying yours is pretty "reasonable" aside from the issue at hand, it is definitely ok to say: Landlord, I am going to be moving out on Wednesday. I appreciate you giving me notice that you'll be showing the place, I just want you to be aware it may not be show-ready those days since my move ...


3

Approach it directly, and help yourself avoid experiencing the issues you have had with the previous landlady with one in the future. ... but on the other hand I think that would seem like accusing your last employer for leaving a job. Renting is very different from employment. A prospective landlord wouldn't take issue with telling you what a past ...


3

Approach it indirectly: Ask the new landlord about the overall state of things in the residency and mention things of concern like hot water, cleanliness, lack of pests, etc... > Be sure to cover what's currently irking you and gauge their response. Then if you still have doubts, ask them to theoretically resolve a sample situation (ex. "Say my residence ...


3

I think the best approach is to clearly demonstrate to them the problem you are having. If it is a website that you believe it is blocked, take your laptop to them or ask them to come over to your place and attempt to connect to the website and show them that the website is blocked. Obviously, whatever message that appears has to unambiguously be a result ...


3

TL;DR: Take it slow, do just the stairs for now, and be gentle, honest and confident, and do your best work, and tell them every detail you can about what you can and will do (as long as they say yes). You seem the kind of guy that covers all his bases, and makes sure that your integrity carries through, as best as you can. I would approach them when they ...


3

Background: kind of "old fashion" / "old school" education / "old" man :D with more than 25 years of living in France. What you call "gift" isn't, stricto sensu, such a thing. I'd rather call that a "kind gesture". In your case, it's a non-verbal communication, and very friendly, because it's not intrusive. It's intended to show appreciation. It's not ...


3

Your first step in building a solid argument is realizing that your landlord does not owe you air conditioning. A/C is an amenity, and so is anything in your apartment that is not due to you by right as a renter. Now, with very few exceptions, you will only be able to convince your landlord to give your unit an additional amenity by explaining why its ...


3

Have you considered paying her early? If you pay the rent two days early, then she won't be able to remind you that she needs paid one day prior. You'll have already paid by then. If she does remind you, you can remind her that you already paid. I don't know that it would make much difference to me if my landlord had the money early (I usually pay a ...


3

Firstly, I am in Australia so I cannot answer specifically for laws in the UK. However, I am pretty confident in saying that your friend's landlords are definitely breaking the law. Nationwide, generally you can't point a security camera in a location that a reasonable person would expect to be afforded privacy. In other words, it's okay to record the ...


3

I've never had to kick out a tenant, but I have had to end relationships, both personal and professional. I feel the situation calls for a similar approach. Assuming you have the right to terminate the lease with notice, I would just do that. If he's avoiding going into his room when you're around, then he already knows the state of his room is a problem, so ...


2

I get why the camera would be indoors as it is more secure indoors and not exposed to the weather. The landlord clearly has little regard for privacy. Sound is not required for security. Comment on who someone is with has nothing to do with security. Talk to the other people to find out if they have a problem. If they do have a problem agree on a ...


2

Two general points of advice: Do not make it about what you want. The landlord kicked you out, you already established as a fact that they don't care what you want. Make it about what they want. Do not tell someone flat out "No". Always sell them a better alternative. For practical reasons everywhere, and in some cultures for them to save face ...


1

This can be a really tough situation. I can empathize with both sides of this dispute, as I have much more sensitive than normal hearing and I've had some friends who are hard of hearing. For somebody who has never heard well, people with above average hearing are really difficult to adjust for. There's a huge difference between knowing something ...


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