18

Don't say "outstanding leader". Outline the traits and practices that make you an outstanding leader. Outline your leadership experience and accomplishments. If you are an "outstanding leader" then you should have good communication and influence skills.


13

I'm in the opposite situation as you. I have worked at two different places (with two different managers) and the first one would often blame me for my lack of initiative. Here are some of the reasons I didn't take more initiative but the most important one is that: I felt like I wasn't allowed to. The thing is, my manager seemed to have a very precise idea ...


11

In my opinion "forcing" someone to participate is not the right thing to do. Someone who isn't "contributing" may be taking it all in, mentally summing up, and just waiting for the right time to launch their bolt into the blue. Or they may not have anything to say, in which case you're just embarrassing them. Or they may have been invited to a meeting ...


11

I used to run some work meetings and attended many others that were run by other departments as well. We had many types, but all fell into the 2 categories you described, some were what we called "round table" which meant more of a brainstorming or discussion session, others had formal agendas. You could be more sensitive in wording. Instead of pointing ...


10

I can often be shy in social situations. One thing that helps when I lead meetings is to ask myself, "What would I wish the organizer would do in this situation?" You're not putting yourself out there in this case; you're serving the group by helping everyone stay on task. A set agenda is always helpful in a meeting and will ensure that important business ...


9

Break things down. An IT professional applying for an IT job will not get the job if their CV truthfully says I'm good with computers. As a born leader with strong leadership qualities you will know the specific qualities, so list them.


6

I think this is somewhat of a Workplace SE question, and this will be somewhat of a Workplace SE answer, but here it is for what it's worth. Aelis answered well from the employee's perspective. I'll add a teacher's perspective when dealing with uncreative students. The problem is similar. It's important, if you want them to try different things and ...


6

You could "solve" this on an interpersonal level, but it seems you have been set up to clash with this person because your organization has not decided on it's processes yet. Your job is Team Lead. His job is Scrum Master. You have a project manager and no mention of a product owner. Now your company needs to decide if this is supposed to be Scrum, or ...


6

In a group of introverts, a good solution is to offer online/paper feedback options to everyone. Freeform, or multiple choice, as appropriate. Also, ask people if they would feel more comfortable if they have an option to offer feedback anonymously.


6

I've often found myself not speaking up in many meetings because 1) the active participants don't leave enough room between expressions and 2) I don't believe the thoughts I'm having are very different or very important compared to what is already being expressed. I do speak up when I feel there's something important left unsaid. When called upon I'm more ...


5

Normally, it's a good idea to be "inclusive." But there are times when people don't want to be included. They may be shy about expressing themselves, or whatever. There are times (critical ones) when everyone must "stand up and be counted." These informal meetings that you are running don't appear to be among them. While it's good of you to give everyone a ...


5

One thing that I've noticed is that if two or more "shy" people get together, the least shy person tends to step forward and take the lead. You appear to be the "least" shy person in the group. So step forward and go for it. Realize that your shyness is actually an advantage in this group of shy people because you will have a better sense of what will and ...


4

You can lead a group without deciding for them. If a question is at hand, you can be a moderator of sorts. You can ask each one what they think in a tactful way that is inviting. Make sure that all comments are appreciated. Praise can be given every time someone speaks up. The key is to be invited to speak without consequence or ill feelings. Minutes can ...


4

Without any context about company culture and Franks motivation, a rather defensive but hopefully bloodless strategy would be to disengage. Working with the product manager and through Frank himself, draw your line in the sand: Itemize responsibilities. His and yours. Make sure everything has a paper trail so you can fall back on this delineation when the ...


3

I agree with Euchris this is more of a Workplace SE question, and this is something of a Workplace SE answer. I've attempted to keep it within IPS SE guidelines and have it still be something of an IPS SE answer as well. My position is similar to yours. I don't manage or supervise any employees, but I have a 'mentoring' task on my job description that's ...


3

Generally I would not at all include a favorable assessment of myself. The reason is that Such a statement is factually worthless to the reader because it is necessarily biased. It also shows that you are not aware of the bias, which is a negative information about your judgement. It shows that you are full of yourself, which is a negative information ...


3

Leadership is not a single trait, particularly in a business setting. Off the top of my head, some different types of leadership are: General leadership involves building consensus and keeping large groups involved without wasting people's time Project leadership involves juggling the different tasks and delegating properly Personal leadership involves ...


3

Agreed the show don’t tell advice is perfect. But you can give examples, a few stories about how your leadership made a difference or how you took over when a leader had failed or similar situations. Also, what about what other people have said about you? Perhaps you have an award, maybe you can refer to somebody who had claimed you were good leader or ...


2

I am a young working professional who has been in this kind of situation before. I think there are a few things that stand out here. Based on your description, it appears Frank is fighting you for real leadership position. You have 2 choices, let him win or fight him for it. For example if you think he is a decent, capable guy and you care more about ...


1

Word of Warning There may actually be no way you can have you cake and eat it, the pay and conditions are subject to the requirements of the job. you may be able to ask for a lower position but with that position will be lower pay (it may still be on more than your old job but less than this TL job). Its also worth noting that doing a job badly can have ...


1

A lot of this depends on the relationship you have with your juniors. I'll approach this from the US perspective. If your relationship is based solely on power, then there may not be a lot of respect there. That makes it harder to make the scolding be effective. I assume you can't assign discipline to the juniors (back in grade school, it was clapping ...


1

A general look on such a situation. Scolding tells them you are not happy with them. If they don't care what others think, this will have no effect. Worse - it will have a negative effect as it decreases their respect for you. What you need is something to make them not happy with themselves. How? This depends on your role in this school. I don't ...


1

Instead of scolding them try to appreciate the people who behave polite/clean/score good marks. You can offer chocolates/cookies to them.This will make the other children to behave good. If you are studying in a school, then I am sure your juniors will be fond of chocolates/cookies. You can also ask their teaching staff to give bonus points to them for their ...


1

Hmm ... how about "Hey X, would you like to weigh in on this?" That is, ask them if they want to give their thoughts. If they don't, then let it be; it's too bad for the shy or apathetic one, because he'll be less likely to get what he wants.


1

I think it depends on why they are quiet. The key here might be to talk to regular shy participants and ask them what would make them more comfortable participating. I've had this discussion with people before and here's a few of the reasons I got: I find it hard to think on the spot during a meeting: After I heard this I started trying to give as much ...


1

I do not know how this would work in Indonesia but I would say something like: Hey Sam! I'd like to make sure that you're happy with what we're deciding. In a moment I'll check in with you to find out if there's anything you would like to be considered. Carry on the conversation with the group before returning to Sam with... Hi Sam, what are your ...


1

The more you fight against Frank, the more defensive he will become, which will manifest as things like additional obstinacy and power grabs - precisely the sort of damaging behavior you are trying to avoid. Although you may not be the root cause of the problem here, be careful that your actions do not inadvertently escalate it. You need to give Frank some ...


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