41

Depending on how comfortable you feel saying it, you could simply say: "Thank you, don't worry about it" And then smile politely. You're not saying something untrue as it was an accident and I doubt you want the person to worry about what he did for the rest of the day, so I feel as though that is a very good alternative for "it's okay" and often I say "...


13

I am delighted to see the question and the interactions. I am (or try to be) a student of life, and I feel I've learned something today. I suggest: "I'm fine; thank you." If he seems unsteady himself, you might then ask, "Are you OK?" "I'll be (or I am) fine. Don't worry about it." [After any manner of chuckle]: "You have a good day, Sir." It's ...


12

"It's ok" doesn't mean "I don't care if people smash into me on the street." It means "I accept your apology and will not continue to hold this against you." Since you are going to walk away and never think of this person again, it's pretty accurate and appropriate. If it's someone you will see again, and you think they were careless and should know you're ...


11

I'm on the autistic spectrum too, sometimes understanding why neurotypical people do the things they do helps me to deal with them... It may be an oversimplification, but to my understanding saying "it's ok" or "no problem" upon receiving an apology isn't the same as saying that there was no reason to apologize. In English at least, saying "no problem" ...


7

There are a lot of "good" reasons this may have happened. He may be really distracted by bad news (or good news). There are a lot of reasons that people may not be paying enough attention to their walking. My advice: unless you are sure it was malicious, assume he had a reason to not be paying enough attention. So politeness is definitely called for. ...


5

Even on a purely literal level, "No problem" doesn't mean that no problem has occurred. Unless there's good reason to assume otherwise, people will assume you're referring to the present situation (as opposed to one second ago, or whenever it was that the other person did what they're apologising for). What you're saying when you say "No problem", then, is ...


5

In those situations where I don't want express something with words, I just stay quiet (sometimes, with my eyes closed) and move my head in a affirmative way (Nod) = like say "yes" with your head1 1 Not so fast "as is shown in the link", but I hope you understand.


4

There's no reason not to be polite, and you don't lose anything by saying "it's OK". This isn't some kind of enemy who might attack you if you show signs of weakness; it's just a guy on the street, so why not just accept his apology and make him feel better? In fact, if you're in Britain, go even further and apologise right back to him, even if it wasn't ...


3

If the apology was enough to resolve the man's social obligation for bumping into you, then "No worries" is the best choice. It simply says that there is no need for further discussion or interaction about it. The man should not worry that there is something else that needs to be done. You could also show concern for him. "I'm ok. Are you ok?" -- Is it ...


2

First of all, the "it" in "It's OK" does not refer to the problem. It refers to the resulting distress. So the statement "it's OK" is 100% true—you are okay with the distress, or you wouldn't forgive. That said, my go-to line is No worries! since it tells them neither of you need to worry about the issue (which you both understand).


1

The response that I give when I've wanted, and feel I deserve, the apology: "Thank you, I appreciate that." I like this because it states that our relationship remains intact, but implies that I'm not ok with what they did: They should not just forget about it, rather, it was a problem, and I don't want them to do it again. Oddly, this implication only ...


1

It can be done in both ways but according to the situation. IF it is a small issue and also it was an old man, he may did it unknowingly. So, if you, instead of just "it's ok", express something, he will be happy because some old people will keep things in mind for days and sometimes for months. If you simply say "It's ok" it may make them feel sad(...


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