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2

If you come on your own, bring a bit more than is needed to feed one average person (may be 50 percent more). If everyone does that than the party has a bit more food than the whole group eats, which is Ok because not everyone likes the same food and some things will be left over. If the host warns you that some people tend to bring rubbish food (either very ...


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The basic principle is that total food brought equals (or slightly exceeds, to be safe) total food consumed. Thus, each person who will be eating a meal should bring at least one whole meal's "worth" of food, in terms of quantity, notwithstanding that the specific food by itself may not make a healthy or appetizing meal. You can think about this in ...


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Growing up in the Midwest, potluck dinners were a mainstay of my existence. They occurred after Lenten worship, Advent worship, and many Sunday festivals. You aren't expected to feed everyone. That's just silly. Basically the expectation, at least where I grew up, was that you brought enough to feed your party and one or two more people. Some dishes go ...


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It depends, so you should ask the host (or even the group at large). There are several factors which could determine the answer: How perishable is the food? If there's leftover food, can/will the host keep it? If there's leftover food, can/will you bring it back with you? If there's leftover food from someone else, can/will you bring it back with you? How ...


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In general, if everyone brought a dish large enough to serve everyone, there would be far too much food. Suppose you expect 20 people and there are 4 "slots" to make a meal, consisting of an appetizer, an entrée, a side, and a dessert. If each person brings a dish for 20 people, everyone could be served with only 4 people bringing a dish. If all 20 ...


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