52

Edit 2: Thorsten S. Has mentioned that German culture is different. I will note that my response may be more applicable to most Canadian (in my experience) business/services/companies. If the company has a certain image to maintain then it's up to management to handle this. If the expectation was not conveyed at the time of hiring then it should be ...


50

There are two points here. First, if you are concerned because of impact on the company, for example because clients react badly to him, then this is a workplace issue. Your boss should take care of it, and the question should be on our workplace site.. If your boss isn't handling it you should go to the boss and explain why you think Bob's image is hurting ...


34

I hope that I am still in time because as a German I can tell that several answers here are inacceptable for German culture. The social contract here is that once a person is accepted and he does not disturb others by dirt/hygiene/smell etc. etc., his clothing and style are off-limits, including the company. There is no "company image" to defend and the ...


22

As a track and field college athlete, I know that practices can make scheduling tough. Sometimes it's hard to squeeze in something like dinner, for instance, because practice goes right up until some other event I have to go to. It's tempting to skip something like a shower and just do that later, so I can have more time. For me, the situation typically ...


17

Bring it up with the owner/landlord. You are trying to communicate with the wrong party. Sometimes, the best solution is not to pick a fight yourself, especially because this is not your fight. Walk away, let the person who is responsible for the building handle it. You do not have the authority to install security cameras yourself, not in shared spaces at ...


15

First things first, start by expressing some concern for his health. I've been sick for a week now, and when I'm sick, I'm usually a bit grumpy. That means that I have a tendency to be on edge. I think that holds for people in general; a two-week cold means that your coworker is probably pretty miserable. It also means that the cold could be more serious ...


13

This isn't so much an interpersonal skills answer as a common sense one, but maybe there's enough overlap. How can I get her to use the bathroom? You can't, unless there's something you have that she wants, and it would be so valuable to her that she'd be willing to navigate the stairs for it. This route necessitates negotiation and compromise. Do you ...


13

I would try the low tech route first. Place a poster with eyes on it at the spot, and see what happens. A group of scientists at Newcastle University, headed by Melissa Bateson and Daniel Nettle of the Center for Behavior and Evolution, conducted a field experiment demonstrating that merely hanging up posters of staring human eyes is enough to ...


12

I'm a clean(-ish) person and my partner a messy and hoarder(-ish) person. We've been living together for a year and a half. Things aren't perfect yet, but we're getting there; it's a process. I was also a messy person until I was 25 years old, so I have an idea of what's it like on the other side. Here are a few things I learned : You can't change someone ...


11

Insights of the problem I am Indian and I can confirm such behaviour. The problem is, in most parts of India, we use bidet as opposed to the tissue papers. Also, even today, many homes have a hole-style toilets and not really the toilet with a seat. The person is habituated to squat instead of sitting on the toilet seat. If the guy is from urban area, don'...


9

Asking your landlord about hydrophobic paint may be an option, depending on the shape/angle of things. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/nov/27/walls-that-pee-back-people-urinate-in-public As mentioned in the article linked above, hydrophobic paint is a bit of an expensive option, but it can be effective in certain situations. Regarding notes or ...


8

What I did during my trip to Japan (I spent a week there) was to go to the bathroom whenever I had to blow my nose. Ideally, I tried to wait for a time when there were no other people in there. When that didn't seem likely, I used flushing to mask the sound. When going to the bathroom was not an option (such as on a street), I would at least try to find a ...


8

When someone has bad breathe I take gum out of my pocket and take a piece for myself, and then offer them a piece. It appears as not rude since they can pretend that I was being polite since I took one for myself, but it solves the problem (at least temporarily). If you continue to do this with the same person they will probably figure it out, so that is ...


8

In general, see first if you can just wipe it with a tissue paper since this is a silent way. However, if you really need to blow it and you think it can be done quickly and silently, turn your head in other side and do that using a tissue paper. If it's going to be really loud, it's better to leave the room by saying, "Excuse me! I'll be back in a ...


8

On the days that your friend comes from track & field, you can give him the opportunity to shower in your bathroom using your toiletries - if he has not done so at home. If he takes the offer, all the better - but if he does not, you could mention that hygiene is rather important. Try to avoid saying "hey man, you smell bad" - as this might give him the ...


8

Oh, I know the feeling! I had a very similar situation with someone I worked with for several years. It was a fairly close work setting, so there wasn't really any way to just avoid him. The way to address this is actually fairly simple: just come out and say it! I don't mean be rude or harsh: something along the lines of, Say, would you mind covering ...


7

The best I can offer is agree with her. Generally agreeing with the person first helps them be more accommodating to your request. So you could say something like I know I shouldn't be so squeamish. I can't seem to get past it though. Then if she really wants the convenience with minimal change I could offer a suggestion that you probably won't ...


7

The rule I always follow, is that if it can't be fixed in 5 seconds, don't bring it up. If somebody has something stuck in their teeth, or something that can be easily fixed on the spot, let them know so they can fix it. But if it is something major that would mean the person would have to head home, or take considerable time to fix, to not mention it to ...


7

What a sticky situation! In a one on one setting, I would be direct and apologetic. Usually the person will feel a little embarrassed, and I would be as warm and reassuring as I could be, and we could reorient where my food was situated to make sure that everyone is comfortable. One-on-one, it is often a great kindness to tell people about a problem they ...


7

To close friends Move closer, and hint that their breath smells without drawing others' attention to it. To not-so-close friends Probably stand a little further away, and hope they sense why I did that. To coworkers Depends on how friendly we are. Refer the abovementioned. To siblings No limit on what I'd say; but not in public though. No formalities. To ...


7

Speaking directly to Bob is the best way. Other options just seem like they will backfire and make you look sneaky. Let's be frank - Bob isn't going to be happy when he finds out that 'Alice' hasn't really got any girlfriends that want to meet him and it was all a trick to get him to get a haircut and shave. You should have called her 'Delilah'. If you have ...


7

I think your best shot is to wait for a "special occasion" when the risk of getting a disease because people don't wash their hands are at the highest (like when there is the flu running around). First, choose a sign you would like to be put in the toilet. Signs are good, they are impersonal and a constant reminder. People won't get defensive over a sign ...


7

I have practiced several martial arts. In one of them I got close to get a black belt. However I was never interested in really violent martial arts, so I didn't have to deal with blood like you describe, because once I noticed the level of violence, if I wasn't comfortable I changed class. But I had to deal with other kind of issues. I practiced Aikido, for ...


7

A friend of mine which had a similar aversion had himself diagnosed and treated for minor OCD and I believe he handles the situation better now. Without saying you have OCD or that you should follow therapy, you should consider that, in the situation you describe: It's very tempting for someone to touch your phone if you are showing something on it. People ...


6

As reflected in AJ's response, it needs to be discreet, and where possible to politely absent yourself to carry out the function. Most people will not be offended by this approach. If you are in a situation where excusing yourself (on a bus, etc.) and the blowing of you nose is a less offensive/threatening action than a runny nose, etc.; then in as quiet ...


6

I've worked in companies that had strict appearance policies from dress code, to hair style, to even shoe style. Such policies are standard in client facing or customer service businesses. I've handled these types of situations often from the position of a front-line employee ranging to senior management. The best course of action in a professional setting, ...


6

I would begin with approaching at least a few more people in the office, and gauging how much they care. Something like this would probably suffice: Hey there I was wondering if you knew anything about how often the cleaning service comes? It seems a bit messy in [room/space] sometimes. This method will draw blame away from the people in question, and ...


6

Before reading my answer consider that I am not a native English speaker. As someone who moved together with a messy partner: Please make sure you are willing and able to live with the mess. I actually thought that there must be a way to sort this topic out. But everything I tried failed. What I learned from this experience is that you can't MAKE people ...


5

Tell them as soon as you can see that they can remove it without anyone else knowing. Or they can decamp to a private place to remove it. You say: You have something stuck in your teeth.


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